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Re: Rye Wiskey

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  • morayman
    ... i always keep a bottle of Jim Beam Rye on the shelf. Thats probably what you have and not JD. I like my Rye whiskeys and have not seen a JD branded rye.
    Message 1 of 5 , Dec 2, 2009
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      --- In new_distillers@yahoogroups.com, "rye_junkie1" <rye_junkie@...> wrote:
      i always keep a bottle of Jim Beam Rye on the shelf. Thats probably what you have and not JD. I like my Rye whiskeys and have not seen a JD branded rye.
      >
      > Mason

      I stand corrected Mason,it was Jim Beam not JD.There is no liquor store around here that carries anything but the Jim Beam,I know there are others,but not where I live,I feel deprived!Anyhow I'm still contemplating making some,just need a good recipe and a nudge to get me going.morayman..........
    • gnikomson2000
      ... In my 30+ years in bakeries, we used 25kg paper bags of Kibbled Rye to enhance our Ryebreads. I can t see any reason why you have to buy expensive
      Message 2 of 5 , Dec 2, 2009
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        --- In new_distillers@yahoogroups.com, "rye_junkie1" <rye_junkie@...> wrote:

        > Rye in my humble opinion is Americas Scotch. It is slowly making a comeback and there are some decent brands out there. Sazerac Rye is a nice one at around 30 bucks a bottle and i always keep a bottle of Jim Beam Rye on the shelf. Thats probably what you have and not JD. I like my Rye whiskeys and have not seen a JD branded rye. All that said, making whiskey isnt easy. I have tried Flaked rye from the brew shop, Rye flour from the grocery store, and Bought Rye berries from the Health food store and ground them myself. 8 lbs rye to 2 lbs barley malt for the last to and i bought rye malt to go with the flaked rye. My skills at the pot still were lacking at the time but i will say that the flaked rye and rye malt came out the best. Flaked grains are by far the easiest to work with but are also more expensive. The rye flour I used was Hodgdon mills. Flour is just a PITA to work with and straining it off is near impossible.
        > There is a 100 acre field about a mile from my house that they plant every year in rye and harvest with a combine. I will probably try to catch the guy this year and give him 20 bucks for a couple of bucket fulls for my next rye making.
        >
        > Mason
        >


        In my 30+ years in bakeries, we used 25kg paper bags of Kibbled Rye to enhance our Ryebreads. I can't see any reason why you have to buy expensive packaged stuff from Grocers or health shops. Try asking your local baker to order some for you when next he orders from the flourmill. You may be surprised how cheap it is. Of course you'll still need powdered enzymes or barley sprout to convert it.

        FYI: "Kibbled Rye and Kibbled Wheat come from the milling process used to reach the state of cracking the grain. It is almost the same as "cracking wheat". Kibbling rollers are used to "split" the grain in half, thus the name. As used in baking bread, cracked wheat is very popular, as it adds a "rustic" taste and appearance to the loaf. Kibbling cracks the grain, thus splitting it and in this process, small granules of the grain and husks are produced, as a byproduct. These are sifted off, as what is desired, in the process, is the "flake" itself."


        Slainte!
        regards Harry
      • abbababbaccc
        That cracked stuff should also work well for sour mash, much easier to do than lautered stuff. For flour you could try my wheat flour mash recipe using rye
        Message 3 of 5 , Dec 2, 2009
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          That cracked stuff should also work well for sour mash, much easier to do than lautered stuff. For flour you could try my wheat flour mash recipe using rye flour instead http://groups.yahoo.com/group/Distillers/message/41703

          Slainte, Riku


          --- In new_distillers@yahoogroups.com, "gnikomson2000" <gnikomson2000@...> wrote:
          >
          > In my 30+ years in bakeries, we used 25kg paper bags of Kibbled Rye to enhance our Ryebreads. I can't see any reason why you have to buy expensive packaged stuff from Grocers or health shops. Try asking your local baker to order some for you when next he orders from the flourmill. You may be surprised how cheap it is. Of course you'll still need powdered enzymes or barley sprout to convert it.
          >
          > FYI: "Kibbled Rye and Kibbled Wheat come from the milling process used to reach the state of cracking the grain. It is almost the same as "cracking wheat". Kibbling rollers are used to "split" the grain in half, thus the name. As used in baking bread, cracked wheat is very popular, as it adds a "rustic" taste and appearance to the loaf. Kibbling cracks the grain, thus splitting it and in this process, small granules of the grain and husks are produced, as a byproduct. These are sifted off, as what is desired, in the process, is the "flake" itself."
          >
          >
          > Slainte!
          > regards Harry
          >
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