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Re: Newbie

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  • poserboy6
    ... I didnt say anything about malting or using enzymes because I didnt think I needed to.. if I do can I just use my original plan but add beano and let sit
    Message 1 of 45 , Apr 29, 2002
      > I didnt see you mention anything about malting the grain or using
      > enzymes to convert the starches to sugars.

      I didnt say anything about malting or using enzymes because I didnt
      think I needed to.. if I do can I just use my original plan but add
      beano and let sit for an extra 3-4 days? how much beano should I add?
      If I have to use enzyme or go through the process of malting can I
      just take 15 lbs of sugar, add yeast, let ferment, and distill that??
      It wouldnt have the corn flavor.. what if I just put some corn in it
      while it ferments would that add a little flavor? one last
      question.. what is striking the grain? ok.. I think thats all the
      question I can ask for now.. any and all help is appreciated..
      peace


      --- In new_distillers@y..., "cornfed62" <cornfed15@h...> wrote:
      > but here is what i'm going to try next:
      > > add 10lbs cracked corn and 5lbs sugar to a 5 gallon bucket next
      add
      > > 2.5 gallons room teperature water and stir... Then bring another
      > 2.5
      > > gallons to a boil and add to the bucket, stir.. wait a day and
      add
      > a
      > > packet of yeast.. then leave to ferment for 4-5 days... after it
      > has
      > > settled strain it and distill..>
      > > PS~ if anyone sees any flaws or potential problems with my plan
      > > please speak up.. peace
      >
      >
      > I didnt see you mention anything about malting the grain or using
      > enzymes to convert the starches to sugars.
      >
      > the procedure that is lited in the making corn whisky book calls
      for
      > the use of a 10 to 20 percent addition of malted grains. They
      > recommend barley.
      >
      > the procedure Mr Smiley says to use calls for you to bring a pot
      with
      > the required amount of water up to 163 (f) 73 (c) then to shut the
      > heat off and strike the grain and about 1/3 of the malted grain
      in.
      > Cover the pot and wait 30 minutes.
      >
      > Then bring the pot to a boil. Hold the boil for 20 to 30 miuntes.
      >
      > Shut off the heat and allow the pot to cool to 152 (f) or 66.5 (c)
      > degrees then stir in the remainder of the malted grain and a
      measured
      > portion of Amylase enzymes. Cover the pot for 90 minutes and allow
      > the conversion to happen.
      >
      > You may need to allow the conversion to continue overnight to make
      > sure that all of the starches have been processed. The enyme
      levels
      > in your malt malt and the type or quality of the added enzymes will
      > determine the speed and effectiveness of the conversion. I have
      > used the food digestive enzyme "Beano" before. It works, but at a
      > slower pace. Usually it completes after about 3 or 4 days. (the
      same
      > amount of time it takes for grain kernals to sprout naturally) For
      > that reason, I ferment on the grain.
      >
      > From that point, you can decide to ferment on the grain or off the
      > grain. Test the solution for sugar content and either run with the
      > result or fortify the solution with sugar to bring the potential up
      > to a higher level. I shoot for a 20 percent sugar content
      solution.
      > Your target may be different depending on if you want a traditional
      > whisky mash or not. You can also add other grains to the mixture
      for
      > a variety of flavor. I have been able to get about 7 percent sugar
      > content off a straight grain starch conversion. The originating
      > content in the corn also effects that number. Some corn hybrids
      have
      > higher sugars than others. Some have higher oils. Depends on what
      > the target market of the hybrid is.
      >
      > Cheers
    • RLB
      Yeah go figure, we can own a still, and we can make beer, wort, and wash legally.  Once you put the two together, then we can end up in jail.  We can make
      Message 45 of 45 , Jan 11, 2014
        Yeah go figure, we can own a still, and we can make beer, wort, and wash legally.  Once you put the two together, then we can end up in jail.  We can make all of the ethanol bio-fuel we want legally with a TTB permit, but you have to make it undrinkable by adding chemicals such as gasoline.  In two US states, its now legal to grow your own pot, and you can now buy pot over the counter in those states.  Almost every state in the US allows medical pot.

        With this in mind, it might be time for us to change state regulations rather then focusing on changing TTB Regulations through the US Senate to allow hobby distilling.  Alli's and other's efforts are commendable, but it will not be easy to change Fed Regulations as a whole.

        I for one will focus my efforts on trying to change New York State House and Senate minds on hobby distilling.  What can the TTB really do if New York State legalizes hobby distilling?  I will stress hobby distilling as a stepping stone and training tool for future legal Pico, Nano, and Micro distilleries here in New York State.  Pico, Nano, and Micro distilleries would provide new jobs and add extra taxes to NYS's coffers.  All of that extra grain required to produce spirits will help agriculture in NYS.  New taxes and jobs should be enough to sell legal hobby distilling in NYS.

        Robert


        From: "wzuccarello@..." <wzuccarello@...>
        To: new_distillers@yahoogroups.com
        Sent: Saturday, January 11, 2014 11:12 AM
        Subject: [new_distillers] RE: Newbie

         
        Not sure about the laws in Au, but in the U.S. It it is not illegal to buy a still, just illegal to use it for producing alcohol.


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