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Proper Handling of 316L

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  • Jay
    Hey Everybody, I recently made a modification to one of the parts on my still. It s a tri-clamp end cap made out of 316L that s about 3 1/2 in diameter and
    Message 1 of 2 , Oct 12, 2009
      Hey Everybody,

      I recently made a modification to one of the parts on my still. It's a tri-clamp end cap made out of 316L that's about 3 1/2" in diameter and 1/4" thick. All I had to do was simply drill 3 small holes through it. I drilled the holes and brushed the burrs off with a stainless wire wheel. The surface was left with a dull finish but I didn't worry about rusting because I thought that I'd done the right thing using a stainless wire wheel. After just a few days, I noticed some rust forming on the area that I had wire wheeled. I suspect that I should've polished the surface to a mirror finish or that I may have used the wheel on carbon steel previously and collected carbon steel particles onto it, later depositing those particles onto my cap.

      I seem to recall recently reading (although I can't quite remember if it was here) the proper techniques for finishing 316L after machining it to prevent rust from forming on it.

      Would anyone like to share some do's and don'ts and the proper methods of metalworking and finishing 316L (and any other applicable stainless steels) so as to prevent rusting?

      Thanks,
      Jay
    • Paul Smith
      You need to pasivate the surface, for 300 series stainless steels you need a specialty pickle which you can get at most good welding supply houses. (IIRC these
      Message 2 of 2 , Oct 12, 2009
        You need to pasivate the surface, for 300 series stainless steels you need a specialty pickle which you can get at most good welding supply houses. (IIRC these pickles contain either hydrofluric acid or the salts there off, so not nice things to work with...)
         
        To get rid of the rust staining use some stainless steel polish that you can get in the home cleaning products section of your local supermarket.
         
        P.

        --- On Mon, 12/10/09, Jay <ak_jay.1976@...> wrote:

        From: Jay <ak_jay.1976@...>
        Subject: [new_distillers] Proper Handling of 316L
        To: new_distillers@yahoogroups.com
        Received: Monday, 12 October, 2009, 8:22 AM

         
        Hey Everybody,

        I recently made a modification to one of the parts on my still. It's a tri-clamp end cap made out of 316L that's about 3 1/2" in diameter and 1/4" thick. All I had to do was simply drill 3 small holes through it. I drilled the holes and brushed the burrs off with a stainless wire wheel. The surface was left with a dull finish but I didn't worry about rusting because I thought that I'd done the right thing using a stainless wire wheel. After just a few days, I noticed some rust forming on the area that I had wire wheeled. I suspect that I should've polished the surface to a mirror finish or that I may have used the wheel on carbon steel previously and collected carbon steel particles onto it, later depositing those particles onto my cap.

        I seem to recall recently reading (although I can't quite remember if it was here) the proper techniques for finishing 316L after machining it to prevent rust from forming on it.

        Would anyone like to share some do's and don'ts and the proper methods of metalworking and finishing 316L (and any other applicable stainless steels) so as to prevent rusting?

        Thanks,
        Jay



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