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Re: Cognac Grapes...

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  • tgfoitwoods
    Hmmmm. In the upper-left USA, raisins are dark, and when we want light-colored raisins, we ask for golden raisins , or (drumroll) sultanas! Zymurgy Bob, a
    Message 1 of 20 , Aug 3, 2009
      Hmmmm. In the upper-left USA, raisins are dark, and when we want light-colored raisins, we ask for "golden raisins", or (drumroll) sultanas!

      Zymurgy Bob, a simple potstiller

      --- In new_distillers@yahoogroups.com, "jamesonbeam1" <jamesonbeam1@...> wrote:
      >
      >
      > Welp heck Baker,
      >
      > As usual ya'll Aussies always have to go your own way LOL....
      >
      > To me a dried grape is a friggin raisin - as it is to most of the world:
      >
      >----snip----
      > >
      > > That's the difference, you see. In Australia the dried fruit of the
      > sultana is not called a raisin but -- wait for it -- a SULTANA!
      > > The dried fruit we call a raisin is generally from a larger grape,
      > quite often a Waltham Cross or perhaps (memory a bit uncerain) Gordo
      > Blanco or others the names of which I don't know.
      > >
      > > Regards,
      > >
      > > The Baker
      ----snip----
    • jamesonbeam1
      ROTF ZB, Welppers, guess ya ll Maniacs must a have a huge Aussie population up there too.... [:D] [:D] [:D] Yes raisins are dark - especially the
      Message 2 of 20 , Aug 3, 2009

        ROTF ZB,

        Welppers, guess ya'll Maniacs must a have a huge Aussie population up there too....  :D:D:D

        Yes raisins are dark - especially the Thompson's seedless raisins, about which Baker and I were having a somewhat sophmoric, but really funny discussion on....

        But guess you didnt read my earlier post #36458 where, according to U.S. Code of Federal Regulations - you ready - BUTA BING BUTA BANG BUTA BOOM:

        "The sultana grape is cultivated in the United States under the name Thompson Seedless, named after William Thompson, a viticulturist who was an early grower in California and is sometimes credited with the variety's introduction.[4][5] According to the U.S. Code of Federal Regulations, the two names are synonymous.[6] Virtually all of California raisin production (approximately 97% in 2000) and roughly one-third of California's total grape area is of this variety, making it the single most widely-planted variety.[7][5]  http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sultana_(grape)

        Now since the Sultana and Thompson's seedless dark raisins are one in the same, then golden raisins should be some other type right???

        But guess what... (nother drum roll):

        "Raisin varieties depend on the type of grape used. Seedless varieties include the Sultana (also known as "Thompson Seedless" in the USA) and Flame. Raisins are typically sun-dried, but may also be "water-dipped," or dehydrated. "Golden raisins" are made from Sultanas, treated with Sulfur Dioxide (SO2) , and flame dried to give them their characteristic color." http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Golden_raisin

        So you see ZB, Thompson's seedless raisins, "Golden Raisins, and Sultanas Grapes are all one in the same animal.....

        So as some famous poet wrote once upon a time:

        "A Raisin is a Raisin, Is a Raisin... "  Or something along them thar lines. LOL :x.

        Vino es Veritas,

        Jim aka Waldo. 


        --- In new_distillers@yahoogroups.com, "tgfoitwoods" <zymurgybob@...> wrote:
        >
        > Hmmmm. In the upper-left USA, raisins are dark, and when we want light-colored raisins, we ask for "golden raisins", or (drumroll) sultanas!
        >
        > Zymurgy Bob, a simple potstiller
        >
        > --- In new_distillers@yahoogroups.com, "jamesonbeam1" jamesonbeam1@ wrote:
        > >
        > >
        > > Welp heck Baker,
        > >
        > > As usual ya'll Aussies always have to go your own way LOL....
        > >
        > > To me a dried grape is a friggin raisin - as it is to most of the world:
        > >
        > >----snip----
        > > >
        > > > That's the difference, you see. In Australia the dried fruit of the
        > > sultana is not called a raisin but -- wait for it -- a SULTANA!
        > > > The dried fruit we call a raisin is generally from a larger grape,
        > > quite often a Waltham Cross or perhaps (memory a bit uncerain) Gordo
        > > Blanco or others the names of which I don't know.
        > > >
        > > > Regards,
        > > >
        > > > The Baker
        > ----snip----
        >

      • jamesonbeam1
        BTW Z Bob, Thinks it was Gertrude Stein that said something like that - but she was talking bout some type of flower.... [;)] JB....
        Message 3 of 20 , Aug 3, 2009

          BTW Z Bob,

          Thinks it was Gertrude Stein that said something like that - but she was talking bout some type of flower.... ;)

          JB....

        • tgfoitwoods
          Aw, Jim, Now you got me *all* confused, but if Gertrude Stein said it, there s a good chance my delicate sensibilities might be offended. She was big on
          Message 4 of 20 , Aug 3, 2009
            Aw, Jim,

            Now you got me *all* confused, but if Gertrude Stein said it, there's a good chance my delicate sensibilities might be offended.

            She was big on raisins, wasn't she? (LOL)

            Zymurgy Bob, a simple potstiller

            --- In new_distillers@yahoogroups.com, "jamesonbeam1" <jamesonbeam1@...> wrote:
            >
            >
            >
            > BTW Z Bob,
            >
            > Thinks it was Gertrude Stein that said something like that - but she was
            > talking bout some type of flower.... [;)]
            >
            > JB....
            >
          • waljaco
            In OZ raisins usually have seeds, dried sultanas are labelled as a separate category. Quirky? wal
            Message 5 of 20 , Aug 4, 2009
              In OZ raisins usually have seeds, dried sultanas are labelled as a separate category. Quirky?
              wal
              --- In new_distillers@yahoogroups.com, "jamesonbeam1" <jamesonbeam1@...> wrote:
              >
              >
              > ROTF ZB,
              >
              > Welppers, guess ya'll Maniacs must a have a huge Aussie population up
              > there too.... [:D] [:D] [:D]
              >
              > Yes raisins are dark - especially the Thompson's seedless raisins, about
              > which Baker and I were having a somewhat sophmoric, but really funny
              > discussion on....
              >
              > But guess you didnt read my earlier post #36458 where, according to U.S.
              > Code of Federal Regulations
              > <http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Code_of_Federal_Regulations> - you ready
              > - BUTA BING BUTA BANG BUTA BOOM:
              >
              > "The sultana grape is cultivated in the United States
              > <http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/United_States> under the name Thompson
              > Seedless, named after William Thompson
              > <http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/William_Thompson_(viticulturist)> , a
              > viticulturist <http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Viticulturist> who was an
              > early grower in California <http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/California>
              > and is sometimes credited with the variety's introduction.[4]
              > <http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sultana_(grape)#cite_note-ahr-3> [5]
              > <http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sultana_(grape)#cite_note-appellationameri\
              > ca-4> According to the U.S. Code of Federal Regulations
              > <http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Code_of_Federal_Regulations> , the two
              > names are synonymous.[6]
              > <http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sultana_(grape)#cite_note-7cfr999.300-5>
              > Virtually all of California raisin production (approximately 97% in
              > 2000) and roughly one-third of California's total grape area is of this
              > variety, making it the single most widely-planted variety.[7]
              > <http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sultana_(grape)#cite_note-usda-6> [5]
              > <http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sultana_(grape)#cite_note-appellationameri\
              > ca-4> http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sultana_(grape
              > <http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sultana_(grape> )
              >
              > Now since the Sultana and Thompson's seedless dark raisins are one in
              > the same, then golden raisins should be some other type right???
              >
              > But guess what... (nother drum roll):
              >
              > "Raisin varieties depend on the type of grape used. Seedless varieties
              > include the Sultana <http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sultana_(grape)>
              > (also known as "Thompson Seedless" in the USA) and Flame. Raisins are
              > typically sun-dried, but may also be "water-dipped," or dehydrated.
              > "Golden raisins" are made from Sultanas, treated with Sulfur Dioxide
              > (SO2) <http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sulfur_Dioxide> , and flame dried
              > to give them their characteristic color."
              > http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Golden_raisin
              > <http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Golden_raisin>
              >
              > So you see ZB, Thompson's seedless raisins, "Golden Raisins, and
              > Sultanas Grapes are all one in the same animal.....
              >
              > So as some famous poet wrote once upon a time:
              >
              > "A Raisin is a Raisin, Is a Raisin... " Or something along them thar
              > lines. LOL [:x] .
              >
              > Vino es Veritas,
              >
              > Jim aka Waldo.
              >
              >
              > --- In new_distillers@yahoogroups.com, "tgfoitwoods" <zymurgybob@>
              > wrote:
              > >
              > > Hmmmm. In the upper-left USA, raisins are dark, and when we want
              > light-colored raisins, we ask for "golden raisins", or (drumroll)
              > sultanas!
              > >
              > > Zymurgy Bob, a simple potstiller
              > >
              > > --- In new_distillers@yahoogroups.com, "jamesonbeam1" jamesonbeam1@
              > wrote:
              > > >
              > > >
              > > > Welp heck Baker,
              > > >
              > > > As usual ya'll Aussies always have to go your own way LOL....
              > > >
              > > > To me a dried grape is a friggin raisin - as it is to most of the
              > world:
              > > >
              > > >----snip----
              > > > >
              > > > > That's the difference, you see. In Australia the dried fruit of
              > the
              > > > sultana is not called a raisin but -- wait for it -- a SULTANA!
              > > > > The dried fruit we call a raisin is generally from a larger grape,
              > > > quite often a Waltham Cross or perhaps (memory a bit uncerain) Gordo
              > > > Blanco or others the names of which I don't know.
              > > > >
              > > > > Regards,
              > > > >
              > > > > The Baker
              > > ----snip----
              > >
              >
            • jamesonbeam1
              I mean really Wal. Those Aussies even have the gaul to sell some of our Bourbons at a lower ABV then is legally allowed to call it Bourbon here in the US
              Message 6 of 20 , Aug 4, 2009

                I mean really Wal.  Those Aussies even have the gaul to sell some of our Bourbons at a lower ABV then is legally allowed to call it Bourbon here in the US  which is 40%.

                Have half a mind to e-mail our fearless leader - Pres. Obama and have him fly down to Oz in Air Force 1 to straighten their heads out down there .... ;)

                Vino es Veritas,

                Jim aka Waldo.


                --- In new_distillers@yahoogroups.com, "waljaco" <waljaco@...> wrote:
                >
                > In OZ raisins usually have seeds, dried sultanas are labelled as a separate category. Quirky?
                > wal

                > --- In new_distillers@yahoogroups.com, "jamesonbeam1" jamesonbeam1@ wrote:
                > >
                > >
                > > ROTF ZB,
                > >
                > > Welppers, guess ya'll Maniacs must a have a huge Aussie population up
                > > there too.... [:D] [:D] [:D]
                > >

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