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Re: Cognac Grapes...

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  • jamesonbeam1
    Hey Baker, While the Sultanas grapes might not be good for making wine by themselves, I ve used Thompson s seeedless raisins in many of my wine recipes,
    Message 1 of 20 , Aug 1, 2009
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      Hey Baker,

      While the Sultanas grapes might not be good for making wine by themselves, I've used Thompson's seeedless raisins in many of my wine recipes, including apple, blackberry and peach.  Has something to do with the added nutrients, flavor and sweetness.

      Jack Keller in his "The Winemaking Home Page" also recommends them in many of his recipes as well.

      Vino es Veritas,

      Jim aka Waldo.


      --- In new_distillers@yahoogroups.com, "gff_stwrt" <gff_stwrt@...> wrote:
      >
      > Hi, Wal and hi, folks,
      >
      > I lived for many years around Mildura where the Sultanas were the grape most grown for dried fruit.
      > It is also known, especially in the USA, as Thompson's Seedless (Raisin, especially when dried).
      > These days it is often blown up to over twice its natural size with the application of gibberelic acid, which I think might be a hormone, and sold as fresh fruit.
      > One can still get beautiful dried sultanas but only from a couple of very small independent packers; the bigger companies mix it with inferior imported fruit, and it is not nearly as nice.
      >
      > Regards,
      >
      > The Baker

    • gff_stwrt
      Hi,Jim and hello folks, Just to be sure there is no misunderstanding; the sultana and the Thompson s seedless are exactly the same fruit. But it might or might
      Message 2 of 20 , Aug 1, 2009
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        Hi,Jim and hello folks,
        Just to be sure there is no misunderstanding; the sultana and the Thompson's seedless are exactly the same fruit.
        But it might or might not be more correct to call the Thompson's seedless a RAISIN after it has been dried.
        Anyway they taste great but I was astonished at the size the first time I saw the treated ones for sale as fresh fruit.

        Regards,

        The Baker



        --- In new_distillers@yahoogroups.com, "jamesonbeam1" <jamesonbeam1@...> wrote:
        >
        >
        > Hey Baker,
        >
        > While the Sultanas grapes might not be good for making wine by
        > themselves, I've used Thompson's seeedless raisins in many of my wine
        > recipes, including apple, blackberry and peach. Has something to do
        > with the added nutrients, flavor and sweetness.
        >
        > Jack Keller in his "The Winemaking Home Page" also recommends them in
        > many of his recipes as well.
        >
        > Vino es Veritas,
        >
        > Jim aka Waldo.
        >
        >
        > --- In new_distillers@yahoogroups.com, "gff_stwrt" <gff_stwrt@>
        > wrote:
        > >
        > > Hi, Wal and hi, folks,
        > >
        > > I lived for many years around Mildura where the Sultanas were the
        > grape most grown for dried fruit.
        > > It is also known, especially in the USA, as Thompson's Seedless
        > (Raisin, especially when dried).
        > > These days it is often blown up to over twice its natural size with
        > the application of gibberelic acid, which I think might be a hormone,
        > and sold as fresh fruit.
        > > One can still get beautiful dried sultanas but only from a couple of
        > very small independent packers; the bigger companies mix it with
        > inferior imported fruit, and it is not nearly as nice.
        > >
        > > Regards,
        > >
        > > The Baker
        >
      • jamesonbeam1
        Yuppers Baker, Well aware that the Sultanas and the Thompson s seedless rasins are one in the same - when the Sultanas are dried, they are indeed called
        Message 3 of 20 , Aug 2, 2009
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          Yuppers Baker,

          Well aware that the Sultanas and the Thompson's seedless rasins are one in the same - when the Sultanas are dried, they are indeed called "raisins.;)

          "The sultana grape is cultivated in the United States under the name Thompson Seedless, named after William Thompson, a viticulturist who was an early grower in California and is sometimes credited with the variety's introduction.[4][5] According to the U.S. Code of Federal Regulations, the two names are synonymous.[6] Virtually all of California raisin production (approximately 97% in 2000) and roughly one-third of California's total grape area is of this variety, making it the single most widely-planted variety.[7][5] 

          http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sultana_(grape)

          But again, Thompson's seedless raisins are widely used in many fruit wine (not grape wines lol) recipes that I have seen.

          Vino es Veritas,

          Jim aka Waldo.


          --- In new_distillers@yahoogroups.com, "gff_stwrt" <gff_stwrt@...> wrote:
          >
          > Hi,Jim and hello folks,
          > Just to be sure there is no misunderstanding; the sultana and the Thompson's seedless are exactly the same fruit.
          > But it might or might not be more correct to call the Thompson's seedless a RAISIN after it has been dried.
          > Anyway they taste great but I was astonished at the size the first time I saw the treated ones for sale as fresh fruit.
          >
          > Regards,
          >
          > The Baker
          >
          >
          >
          > --- In new_distillers@yahoogroups.com, "jamesonbeam1" jamesonbeam1@ wrote:
          > >
          > >
          > > Hey Baker,
          > >
          > > While the Sultanas grapes might not be good for making wine by
          > > themselves, I've used Thompson's seeedless raisins in many of my wine
          > > recipes, including apple, blackberry and peach. Has something to do
          > > with the added nutrients, flavor and sweetness.
          > >
          > > Jack Keller in his "The Winemaking Home Page" also recommends them in
          > > many of his recipes as well.
          > >
          > > Vino es Veritas,
          > >
          > > Jim aka Waldo.

        • gff_stwrt
          Hi, Jim and folks, That s the difference, you see. In Australia the dried fruit of the sultana is not called a raisin but -- wait for it -- a SULTANA! The
          Message 4 of 20 , Aug 3, 2009
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            Hi, Jim and folks,

            That's the difference, you see. In Australia the dried fruit of the sultana is not called a raisin but -- wait for it -- a SULTANA!
            The dried fruit we call a raisin is generally from a larger grape, quite often a Waltham Cross or perhaps (memory a bit uncerain) Gordo Blanco or others the names of which I don't know.

            Regards,

            The Baker
            --- In new_distillers@yahoogroups.com, "jamesonbeam1" <jamesonbeam1@...> wrote:
            >
            >
            > Yuppers Baker,
            >
            > Well aware that the Sultanas and the Thompson's seedless rasins are one
            > in the same - when the Sultanas are dried, they are indeed called
            > "raisins. [;)]
            >
            > "The sultana grape is cultivated in the United States
            > <http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/United_States> under the name Thompson
            > Seedless, named after William Thompson
            > <http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/William_Thompson_(viticulturist)> , a
            > viticulturist <http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Viticulturist> who was an
            > early grower in California <http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/California>
            > and is sometimes credited with the variety's introduction.[4]
            > <http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sultana_(grape)#cite_note-ahr-3> [5]
            > <http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sultana_(grape)#cite_note-appellationameri\
            > ca-4> According to the U.S. Code of Federal Regulations
            > <http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Code_of_Federal_Regulations> , the two
            > names are synonymous.[6]
            > <http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sultana_(grape)#cite_note-7cfr999.300-5>
            > Virtually all of California raisin production (approximately 97% in
            > 2000) and roughly one-third of California's total grape area is of this
            > variety, making it the single most widely-planted variety.[7]
            > <http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sultana_(grape)#cite_note-usda-6> [5]
            > <http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sultana_(grape)#cite_note-appellationameri\
            > ca-4>
            >
            > http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sultana_(grape
            > <http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sultana_(grape> )
            >
            > But again, Thompson's seedless raisins are widely used in many fruit
            > wine (not grape wines lol) recipes that I have seen.
            >
            > Vino es Veritas,
            >
            > Jim aka Waldo.
            >
            >
            > --- In new_distillers@yahoogroups.com, "gff_stwrt" <gff_stwrt@>
            > wrote:
            > >
            > > Hi,Jim and hello folks,
            > > Just to be sure there is no misunderstanding; the sultana and the
            > Thompson's seedless are exactly the same fruit.
            > > But it might or might not be more correct to call the Thompson's
            > seedless a RAISIN after it has been dried.
            > > Anyway they taste great but I was astonished at the size the first
            > time I saw the treated ones for sale as fresh fruit.
            > >
            > > Regards,
            > >
            > > The Baker
          • jamesonbeam1
            Welp heck Baker, As usual ya ll Aussies always have to go your own way LOL.... To me a dried grape is a friggin raisin - as it is to most of the world: Raisins
            Message 5 of 20 , Aug 3, 2009
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              Welp heck Baker,

              As usual ya'll Aussies always have to go your own way LOL....

              To me a dried grape is a friggin raisin - as it is to most of the world:

              Raisins are dried grapes. They are produced in many regions of the world, such as Armenia, the United States, Australia, Chile, Argentina, Macedonia, Mexico, Greece, Syria, Turkey, India, Iran, Pakistan, Iraq, China, Afghanistan, Togo, and Jamaica, as well as South Africa and Southern and Eastern Europe. Raisins may be eaten raw or used in cooking and bakinghttp://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Raisin

              Although, Im sure someone like Wal will have a different scope on this subject... ;)

              Vino es Veritas,

              Jim aska Waldo.

              --- In new_distillers@yahoogroups.com, "gff_stwrt" <gff_stwrt@...> wrote:
              >
              > Hi, Jim and folks,
              >
              > That's the difference, you see. In Australia the dried fruit of the sultana is not called a raisin but -- wait for it -- a SULTANA!
              > The dried fruit we call a raisin is generally from a larger grape, quite often a Waltham Cross or perhaps (memory a bit uncerain) Gordo Blanco or others the names of which I don't know.
              >
              > Regards,
              >
              > The Baker

              > --- In new_distillers@yahoogroups.com, "jamesonbeam1" jamesonbeam1@ wrote:
              > >
              > >
              > > Yuppers Baker,
              > >
              > > Well aware that the Sultanas and the Thompson's seedless rasins are one
              > > in the same - when the Sultanas are dried, they are indeed called
              > > "raisins. [;)]
              _____snip

            • tgfoitwoods
              Hmmmm. In the upper-left USA, raisins are dark, and when we want light-colored raisins, we ask for golden raisins , or (drumroll) sultanas! Zymurgy Bob, a
              Message 6 of 20 , Aug 3, 2009
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                Hmmmm. In the upper-left USA, raisins are dark, and when we want light-colored raisins, we ask for "golden raisins", or (drumroll) sultanas!

                Zymurgy Bob, a simple potstiller

                --- In new_distillers@yahoogroups.com, "jamesonbeam1" <jamesonbeam1@...> wrote:
                >
                >
                > Welp heck Baker,
                >
                > As usual ya'll Aussies always have to go your own way LOL....
                >
                > To me a dried grape is a friggin raisin - as it is to most of the world:
                >
                >----snip----
                > >
                > > That's the difference, you see. In Australia the dried fruit of the
                > sultana is not called a raisin but -- wait for it -- a SULTANA!
                > > The dried fruit we call a raisin is generally from a larger grape,
                > quite often a Waltham Cross or perhaps (memory a bit uncerain) Gordo
                > Blanco or others the names of which I don't know.
                > >
                > > Regards,
                > >
                > > The Baker
                ----snip----
              • jamesonbeam1
                ROTF ZB, Welppers, guess ya ll Maniacs must a have a huge Aussie population up there too.... [:D] [:D] [:D] Yes raisins are dark - especially the
                Message 7 of 20 , Aug 3, 2009
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                  ROTF ZB,

                  Welppers, guess ya'll Maniacs must a have a huge Aussie population up there too....  :D:D:D

                  Yes raisins are dark - especially the Thompson's seedless raisins, about which Baker and I were having a somewhat sophmoric, but really funny discussion on....

                  But guess you didnt read my earlier post #36458 where, according to U.S. Code of Federal Regulations - you ready - BUTA BING BUTA BANG BUTA BOOM:

                  "The sultana grape is cultivated in the United States under the name Thompson Seedless, named after William Thompson, a viticulturist who was an early grower in California and is sometimes credited with the variety's introduction.[4][5] According to the U.S. Code of Federal Regulations, the two names are synonymous.[6] Virtually all of California raisin production (approximately 97% in 2000) and roughly one-third of California's total grape area is of this variety, making it the single most widely-planted variety.[7][5]  http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sultana_(grape)

                  Now since the Sultana and Thompson's seedless dark raisins are one in the same, then golden raisins should be some other type right???

                  But guess what... (nother drum roll):

                  "Raisin varieties depend on the type of grape used. Seedless varieties include the Sultana (also known as "Thompson Seedless" in the USA) and Flame. Raisins are typically sun-dried, but may also be "water-dipped," or dehydrated. "Golden raisins" are made from Sultanas, treated with Sulfur Dioxide (SO2) , and flame dried to give them their characteristic color." http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Golden_raisin

                  So you see ZB, Thompson's seedless raisins, "Golden Raisins, and Sultanas Grapes are all one in the same animal.....

                  So as some famous poet wrote once upon a time:

                  "A Raisin is a Raisin, Is a Raisin... "  Or something along them thar lines. LOL :x.

                  Vino es Veritas,

                  Jim aka Waldo. 


                  --- In new_distillers@yahoogroups.com, "tgfoitwoods" <zymurgybob@...> wrote:
                  >
                  > Hmmmm. In the upper-left USA, raisins are dark, and when we want light-colored raisins, we ask for "golden raisins", or (drumroll) sultanas!
                  >
                  > Zymurgy Bob, a simple potstiller
                  >
                  > --- In new_distillers@yahoogroups.com, "jamesonbeam1" jamesonbeam1@ wrote:
                  > >
                  > >
                  > > Welp heck Baker,
                  > >
                  > > As usual ya'll Aussies always have to go your own way LOL....
                  > >
                  > > To me a dried grape is a friggin raisin - as it is to most of the world:
                  > >
                  > >----snip----
                  > > >
                  > > > That's the difference, you see. In Australia the dried fruit of the
                  > > sultana is not called a raisin but -- wait for it -- a SULTANA!
                  > > > The dried fruit we call a raisin is generally from a larger grape,
                  > > quite often a Waltham Cross or perhaps (memory a bit uncerain) Gordo
                  > > Blanco or others the names of which I don't know.
                  > > >
                  > > > Regards,
                  > > >
                  > > > The Baker
                  > ----snip----
                  >

                • jamesonbeam1
                  BTW Z Bob, Thinks it was Gertrude Stein that said something like that - but she was talking bout some type of flower.... [;)] JB....
                  Message 8 of 20 , Aug 3, 2009
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                    BTW Z Bob,

                    Thinks it was Gertrude Stein that said something like that - but she was talking bout some type of flower.... ;)

                    JB....

                  • tgfoitwoods
                    Aw, Jim, Now you got me *all* confused, but if Gertrude Stein said it, there s a good chance my delicate sensibilities might be offended. She was big on
                    Message 9 of 20 , Aug 3, 2009
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                      Aw, Jim,

                      Now you got me *all* confused, but if Gertrude Stein said it, there's a good chance my delicate sensibilities might be offended.

                      She was big on raisins, wasn't she? (LOL)

                      Zymurgy Bob, a simple potstiller

                      --- In new_distillers@yahoogroups.com, "jamesonbeam1" <jamesonbeam1@...> wrote:
                      >
                      >
                      >
                      > BTW Z Bob,
                      >
                      > Thinks it was Gertrude Stein that said something like that - but she was
                      > talking bout some type of flower.... [;)]
                      >
                      > JB....
                      >
                    • waljaco
                      In OZ raisins usually have seeds, dried sultanas are labelled as a separate category. Quirky? wal
                      Message 10 of 20 , Aug 4, 2009
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                        In OZ raisins usually have seeds, dried sultanas are labelled as a separate category. Quirky?
                        wal
                        --- In new_distillers@yahoogroups.com, "jamesonbeam1" <jamesonbeam1@...> wrote:
                        >
                        >
                        > ROTF ZB,
                        >
                        > Welppers, guess ya'll Maniacs must a have a huge Aussie population up
                        > there too.... [:D] [:D] [:D]
                        >
                        > Yes raisins are dark - especially the Thompson's seedless raisins, about
                        > which Baker and I were having a somewhat sophmoric, but really funny
                        > discussion on....
                        >
                        > But guess you didnt read my earlier post #36458 where, according to U.S.
                        > Code of Federal Regulations
                        > <http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Code_of_Federal_Regulations> - you ready
                        > - BUTA BING BUTA BANG BUTA BOOM:
                        >
                        > "The sultana grape is cultivated in the United States
                        > <http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/United_States> under the name Thompson
                        > Seedless, named after William Thompson
                        > <http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/William_Thompson_(viticulturist)> , a
                        > viticulturist <http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Viticulturist> who was an
                        > early grower in California <http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/California>
                        > and is sometimes credited with the variety's introduction.[4]
                        > <http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sultana_(grape)#cite_note-ahr-3> [5]
                        > <http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sultana_(grape)#cite_note-appellationameri\
                        > ca-4> According to the U.S. Code of Federal Regulations
                        > <http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Code_of_Federal_Regulations> , the two
                        > names are synonymous.[6]
                        > <http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sultana_(grape)#cite_note-7cfr999.300-5>
                        > Virtually all of California raisin production (approximately 97% in
                        > 2000) and roughly one-third of California's total grape area is of this
                        > variety, making it the single most widely-planted variety.[7]
                        > <http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sultana_(grape)#cite_note-usda-6> [5]
                        > <http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sultana_(grape)#cite_note-appellationameri\
                        > ca-4> http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sultana_(grape
                        > <http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sultana_(grape> )
                        >
                        > Now since the Sultana and Thompson's seedless dark raisins are one in
                        > the same, then golden raisins should be some other type right???
                        >
                        > But guess what... (nother drum roll):
                        >
                        > "Raisin varieties depend on the type of grape used. Seedless varieties
                        > include the Sultana <http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sultana_(grape)>
                        > (also known as "Thompson Seedless" in the USA) and Flame. Raisins are
                        > typically sun-dried, but may also be "water-dipped," or dehydrated.
                        > "Golden raisins" are made from Sultanas, treated with Sulfur Dioxide
                        > (SO2) <http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sulfur_Dioxide> , and flame dried
                        > to give them their characteristic color."
                        > http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Golden_raisin
                        > <http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Golden_raisin>
                        >
                        > So you see ZB, Thompson's seedless raisins, "Golden Raisins, and
                        > Sultanas Grapes are all one in the same animal.....
                        >
                        > So as some famous poet wrote once upon a time:
                        >
                        > "A Raisin is a Raisin, Is a Raisin... " Or something along them thar
                        > lines. LOL [:x] .
                        >
                        > Vino es Veritas,
                        >
                        > Jim aka Waldo.
                        >
                        >
                        > --- In new_distillers@yahoogroups.com, "tgfoitwoods" <zymurgybob@>
                        > wrote:
                        > >
                        > > Hmmmm. In the upper-left USA, raisins are dark, and when we want
                        > light-colored raisins, we ask for "golden raisins", or (drumroll)
                        > sultanas!
                        > >
                        > > Zymurgy Bob, a simple potstiller
                        > >
                        > > --- In new_distillers@yahoogroups.com, "jamesonbeam1" jamesonbeam1@
                        > wrote:
                        > > >
                        > > >
                        > > > Welp heck Baker,
                        > > >
                        > > > As usual ya'll Aussies always have to go your own way LOL....
                        > > >
                        > > > To me a dried grape is a friggin raisin - as it is to most of the
                        > world:
                        > > >
                        > > >----snip----
                        > > > >
                        > > > > That's the difference, you see. In Australia the dried fruit of
                        > the
                        > > > sultana is not called a raisin but -- wait for it -- a SULTANA!
                        > > > > The dried fruit we call a raisin is generally from a larger grape,
                        > > > quite often a Waltham Cross or perhaps (memory a bit uncerain) Gordo
                        > > > Blanco or others the names of which I don't know.
                        > > > >
                        > > > > Regards,
                        > > > >
                        > > > > The Baker
                        > > ----snip----
                        > >
                        >
                      • jamesonbeam1
                        I mean really Wal. Those Aussies even have the gaul to sell some of our Bourbons at a lower ABV then is legally allowed to call it Bourbon here in the US
                        Message 11 of 20 , Aug 4, 2009
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                          I mean really Wal.  Those Aussies even have the gaul to sell some of our Bourbons at a lower ABV then is legally allowed to call it Bourbon here in the US  which is 40%.

                          Have half a mind to e-mail our fearless leader - Pres. Obama and have him fly down to Oz in Air Force 1 to straighten their heads out down there .... ;)

                          Vino es Veritas,

                          Jim aka Waldo.


                          --- In new_distillers@yahoogroups.com, "waljaco" <waljaco@...> wrote:
                          >
                          > In OZ raisins usually have seeds, dried sultanas are labelled as a separate category. Quirky?
                          > wal

                          > --- In new_distillers@yahoogroups.com, "jamesonbeam1" jamesonbeam1@ wrote:
                          > >
                          > >
                          > > ROTF ZB,
                          > >
                          > > Welppers, guess ya'll Maniacs must a have a huge Aussie population up
                          > > there too.... [:D] [:D] [:D]
                          > >

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