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Buying Yeast

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  • canadianguy236
    Hi Group I have been using bread yeast thus far in the wheat germ recipe and would like to step it up to a higher producing yeast. I have been to Mile High s
    Message 1 of 7 , Jul 21, 2009
      Hi Group
      I have been using bread yeast thus far in the wheat germ recipe and would like to step it up to a higher producing yeast. I have been to Mile High's wed site and they have yeast in 55lbs bags, with a nice price to it as well. Can anyone recommend anything? I want to get into doing rye's and brandy's for the most part for now.

      If I step up the yeast, will the wheat germ recipe need anything more added to it? What a rookie eh!...lol

      Thanks Again,

      Snowman
    • castillo.alex2008
      Hi Snow Something very affordable and a very good product is EC-1118, very popular around, I think the sachet of 5 grams is less than 1 buck! But you must know
      Message 2 of 7 , Jul 22, 2009
        Hi Snow

        Something very affordable and a very good product is EC-1118, very popular around, I think the sachet of 5 grams is less than 1 buck! But you must know that is a low ester producing yeast so don´t expect fancy flavors. In the other hand EDV 493 is excellent giving flavor, but maybe a little expensive according to some people.

        Alex
      • jamesonbeam1
        Ok Snow, Wow, Ho Ho boy..... Me thinks your trying to gallop before learning how to trot. Im all for ya upgrading from baker s yeast, but not starting off
        Message 3 of 7 , Jul 22, 2009

          Ok Snow,

          Wow, Ho Ho boy.....  Me thinks your trying to gallop before learning how to trot.

          Im all for ya upgrading from baker's yeast, but not starting off with 25 kg. bags of turbo yeast...  Now unless your planning on making 5000 / 10,000 or more liters of mash over the next year to 18 months (which is the average shelf life of dryed yeast) and going commercial, me thinks your getting way over ya head looking at those. :-s

          Ok, first off,  those turbo yeasts are ment to ferment 14% to 20% ABV, so they are a species of S. Bayanus, like EC-1118 and K1V-1116 Lalvin yeasts.  The first yeast -  Bulk Turbo Yeast 25kg (55lb) 48-Hour Turbo  is specifically developed for an all sugar wash.

          The second bulk yeast -

          Bulk Liquor Quik™ 25kg (55lb) 48-Hour Turbo with AG is ment for grain mashes, which would be more inline with what your planning on making.  If your heading towards all-grain brewing, then I would consider try this brand out - but again, NOT 25 kg. worth.  I would first try their 1 kg bag of it for 16.99.  It only requires 3/4th of a teaspoon per liter, so im sure theres enough for several hundered liters.  However, for all-grain mashing, your going to need either malted barley, or their BA / GA-100 enzymes for the alpha and beta amylase enzymes.  As the instructions state:

           DIRECTIONS: Use at a maximum ratio of 3.65 (.75 tsp) per liter of fermentation grain mash (corn, barley, rye, oats etc. Makes up to 18% ABV.
          NOTE: Amylase Enzyme (not included) is required to convert grain starch to fermentable sugars first.  Keep fermentation temperature constant between 21-25° (70-77°) until fermentation ceases.
          INGREDIENTS: High Alcohol Distiller's Yeast, Yeast Nutrients, Amyloglucosidase.

          Some food for thought though:  By going to all-grain mashing, your only going to get around a 7% to 8% ABV without adding more sugars..  If you start making your mashes over 7% to 10% ABV you will start loosing the grain flavors to a higher ABV distillation.  This will defeat the whole purpose of all grain mashes, so really there is no reason for getting a turbo yeast that distills from 14% to 20%....

          Might want to shop around some more.  But you can try it.  Also check out Gert Strand's Whiskey yeast with AG - hear thats pretty good to.

          HTH.

          Vino es Veritas,

          Jim aka Waldo.


          --- In new_distillers@yahoogroups.com, "canadianguy236" <hawklinemfg@...> wrote:
          >
          > Hi Group
          > I have been using bread yeast thus far in the wheat germ recipe and would like to step it up to a higher producing yeast. I have been to Mile High's wed site and they have yeast in 55lbs bags, with a nice price to it as well. Can anyone recommend anything? I want to get into doing rye's and brandy's for the most part for now.
          >
          > If I step up the yeast, will the wheat germ recipe need anything more added to it? What a rookie eh!...lol
          >
          > Thanks Again,
          >
          > Snowman
          >

        • canadianguy236
          Hi ya Waldo Yes your quite correct in saying 55lbs is way to much yeast, that s the problem. I only want around a pound or so. I m not ever going to use that
          Message 4 of 7 , Jul 22, 2009
            Hi ya Waldo
            Yes your quite correct in saying 55lbs is way to much yeast, that's the problem. I only want around a pound or so. I'm not ever going to use that much yeast. I just wanted to get off the bakers yeast and get more flavors and a little more percentage then what I'm currently getting from the bakers yeast. I'm just looking for a good overall yeast. I didn't realize they sold smaller amounts. Good to know! I didn't see the EC-1118 and K1V-1116 Lalvin yeast on the site. I will look more closely. I have a family member that's into Vodka, so using turbo yeast would work quite well for Vodka as I'm striping it anyway right?

            I did pick up some BA 100 enzyme's, as I do want to get into the grain aspect of the hobby as well. I live in the grain belt here in Canada so grains are easy to attain. Will this work for say an Apricot Brandy as well though?

            Thanks,

            Snowman

            --- In new_distillers@yahoogroups.com, "jamesonbeam1" <jamesonbeam1@...> wrote:
            >
            >
            > Ok Snow,
            >
            > Wow, Ho Ho boy..... Me thinks your trying to gallop before learning how
            > to trot.
            >
            > Im all for ya upgrading from baker's yeast, but not starting off with 25
            > kg. bags of turbo yeast... Now unless your planning on making 5000 /
            > 10,000 or more liters of mash over the next year to 18 months (which is
            > the average shelf life of dryed yeast) and going commercial, me thinks
            > your getting way over ya head looking at those. [:-s]
            >
            > Ok, first off, those turbo yeasts are ment to ferment 14% to 20% ABV,
            > so they are a species of S. Bayanus, like EC-1118 and K1V-1116 Lalvin
            > yeasts. The first yeast - Bulk Turbo Yeast 25kg (55lb) 48-Hour Turbo
            > <http://www.milehidistilling.com/Bulk_Liquor_25kg_55lb_48_Hour_Turbo_p/b\
            > 83320.htm> is specifically developed for an all sugar wash.
            >
            > The second bulk yeast -
            > Bulk Liquor Quik™ 25kg (55lb) 48-Hour Turbo with AG
            > <http://www.milehidistilling.com/Bulk_Liquor_Quik_trade_25kg_55lb_48_Hou\Turbo_p/b83329.
            > r_htm> is ment for grain mashes, which would be more
            > inline with what your planning on making. If your heading towards
            > all-grain brewing, then I would consider try this brand out - but again,
            > NOT 25 kg. worth. I would first try their 1 kg bag of it for 16.99. It
            > only requires 3/4th of a teaspoon per liter, so im sure theres enough
            > for several hundered liters. However, for all-grain mashing, your going
            > to need either malted barley, or their BA / GA-100 enzymes for the alpha
            > and beta amylase enzymes. As the instructions state:
            >
            > DIRECTIONS: Use at a maximum ratio of 3.65 (.75 tsp) per liter of
            > fermentation grain mash (corn, barley, rye, oats etc. Makes up to 18%
            > ABV.
            > NOTE: Amylase Enzyme (not included) is required to convert grain starch
            > to fermentable sugars first. Keep fermentation temperature constant
            > between 21-25° (70-77°) until fermentation ceases.
            > INGREDIENTS: High Alcohol Distiller's Yeast, Yeast Nutrients,
            > Amyloglucosidase.
            >
            >
            > Some food for thought though: By going to all-grain mashing, your only
            > going to get around a 7% to 8% ABV without adding more sugars.. If you
            > start making your mashes over 7% to 10% ABV you will start loosing the
            > grain flavors to a higher ABV distillation. This will defeat the whole
            > purpose of all grain mashes, so really there is no reason for getting a
            > turbo yeast that distills from 14% to 20%....
            >
            > Might want to shop around some more. But you can try it. Also check
            > out Gert Strand's Whiskey yeast with AG - hear thats pretty good to.
            >
            > HTH.
            >
            > Vino es Veritas,
            >
            > Jim aka Waldo.
            >
            >
          • rye_junkie1
            ... You also need the GA100 enzymes. The BA breaks down the starches and liquefies them. The GA does the final conversion and also converts the non
            Message 5 of 7 , Jul 22, 2009
              --- In new_distillers@yahoogroups.com, "canadianguy236" <hawklinemfg@...> wrote:
              >
              >
              > Hi ya Waldo
              > Yes your quite correct in saying 55lbs is way to much yeast, that's the problem. I only want around a pound or so. I'm not ever going to use that much yeast. I just wanted to get off the bakers yeast and get more flavors and a little more percentage then what I'm currently getting from the bakers yeast. I'm just looking for a good overall yeast. I didn't realize they sold smaller amounts. Good to know! I didn't see the EC-1118 and K1V-1116 Lalvin yeast on the site. I will look more closely. I have a family member that's into Vodka, so using turbo yeast would work quite well for Vodka as I'm striping it anyway right?
              >
              > I did pick up some BA 100 enzyme's, as I do want to get into the grain aspect of the hobby as well. I live in the grain belt here in Canada so grains are easy to attain. Will this work for say an Apricot Brandy as well though?
              >
              > Thanks,
              >
              > Snowman


              You also need the GA100 enzymes. The BA breaks down the starches and liquefies them. The GA does the final conversion and also converts the non fermentable sugars in the mash. A top shelf yeast is the brewhaus prestige whiskey yeast with AG(as Jim pointed out). I have used it a few times. I am also very partial to Fermentis brand Safale05. The stuff with AG should/could take the place of the GA100 if you go that route. Another yeast I have grown fond of is Coopers brewers yeast. If I am playing with grains I stay away from bread yeast but for Sugar washes its bread yeast or EC1118.
              Safale05 will go to 15% if you dont hit it with it all at once.
              Never pushed the Brewhaus stuff to its limit. If you are making whiskey 1.060 is as high as you want to go anyway.

              Mason
            • tgfoitwoods
              Snowman, You won t need those enzymes for apricot brandy, because there is no starch to convert to sugar. I ve done some apricot brandies, and I love them.
              Message 6 of 7 , Jul 22, 2009
                Snowman,

                You won't need those enzymes for apricot brandy, because there is no starch to convert to sugar.

                I've done some apricot brandies, and I love them. Just make an apricot wine, with no sugar added, and be sure to have a strainer bag (like a 5-gallon paint strainer bag) to get all that snotty apricot gunk out of your wash before you distill it. Otherwise you'll scorch for sure.

                Because I never have much fruit for such brandies, and because I want maximum flavor, I usually don't beer strip, and just single distill.

                Hope this helps.

                Zymurgy Bob, a simple potstiller
                >
                > I did pick up some BA 100 enzyme's, as I do want to get into the grain aspect of the hobby as well. I live in the grain belt here in Canada so grains are easy to attain. Will this work for say an Apricot Brandy as well though?
                >
                > Thanks,
                >
                > Snowman
                >
                ----snip----
              • gff_stwrt
                Hi, hawk and hello folks, I made apricot brandy recently and just let it ferment with the natural yeast on the fruit. I used the high-tech recipe of adding
                Message 7 of 7 , Jul 23, 2009
                  Hi, hawk and hello folks,
                  I made apricot brandy recently and just let it ferment with the natural yeast on the fruit. I used the high-tech recipe of adding enough mildly- sweetened water to make the fruit 'easy to handle'.

                  Fermentation went like the clappers. Every time I had a new container full I added a bit of the wildly fermenting stuff from the previous lot, to give it a good start. Don't know how much I did altogether but I have around eighteen litres of STONES left that I am going to crack,soon,to make amaretto from the kernels!

                  If I am lucky enough to get the (free) fruit from the same trees again this year (it's midwinter now in Australia) I might try fermenting the whole fruit (it was a lot of work removing all those stones). Just mash the fruit a bit in the fermenter with a small wooden post or something. Still add some water and sugar as before, after mashing.

                  And push it through a 'strainer' with holes so big they just stop the stones from going through, when it is partly fermented.

                  Anyway, hawk, good luck,

                  The Baker

                  --- In new_distillers@yahoogroups.com, "rye_junkie1" <rye_junkie@...> wrote:
                  >
                  > --- In new_distillers@yahoogroups.com, "canadianguy236" <hawklinemfg@> wrote:
                  > >
                  > >
                  > > Hi ya Waldo
                  > > Yes your quite correct in saying 55lbs is way to much yeast, that's the problem. I only want around a pound or so. I'm not ever going to use that much yeast. I just wanted to get off the bakers yeast and get more flavors and a little more percentage then what I'm currently getting from the bakers yeast. I'm just looking for a good overall yeast. I didn't realize they sold smaller amounts. Good to know! I didn't see the EC-1118 and K1V-1116 Lalvin yeast on the site. I will look more closely. I have a family member that's into Vodka, so using turbo yeast would work quite well for Vodka as I'm striping it anyway right?
                  > >
                  > > I did pick up some BA 100 enzyme's, as I do want to get into the grain aspect of the hobby as well. I live in the grain belt here in Canada so grains are easy to attain. Will this work for say an Apricot Brandy as well though?
                  > >
                  > > Thanks,
                  > >
                  > > Snowman
                  >
                  >
                  > You also need the GA100 enzymes. The BA breaks down the starches and liquefies them. The GA does the final conversion and also converts the non fermentable sugars in the mash. A top shelf yeast is the brewhaus prestige whiskey yeast with AG(as Jim pointed out). I have used it a few times. I am also very partial to Fermentis brand Safale05. The stuff with AG should/could take the place of the GA100 if you go that route. Another yeast I have grown fond of is Coopers brewers yeast. If I am playing with grains I stay away from bread yeast but for Sugar washes its bread yeast or EC1118.
                  > Safale05 will go to 15% if you dont hit it with it all at once.
                  > Never pushed the Brewhaus stuff to its limit. If you are making whiskey 1.060 is as high as you want to go anyway.
                  >
                  > Mason
                  >
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