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ageing scotch

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  • Tom Smith
    I was going through some of my product and I found a jug of scotch that I had made about 3 years ago. it was a all grain mash and as at the time I was new the
    Message 1 of 9 , May 29, 2009
      I was going through some of my product and I found a jug of scotch that I had made about 3 years ago. it was a all grain mash and as at the time I was new the cuts were not very precise. however I aged it for about 2 months and I felt it was very sharp tasting. so I put it in a jug with about 1/2 cup of pearled barley and let it set for about 3 weeks then I strained it and put it back on oak and I forgot about it. till now. I just tasted it and I think it's great. so I compared it to a bottle of Glenmorangie that I have and I have to say that I think that it's better. It has just as much flavor without the iodine sharp taste of the commercial stuff. Has anybody else tried smoothing out whisky with pearled barley? I have tried many things and it seems if you have a sharp tasting distilate just about any thing that you add to it improves it. comments anybody

      YoungBlood
    • Nathan Stanley
      No comments on scotch as I don t really like it but I have made what I am calling rum since its just a sugar wash and aged in a French Oak barrel for a year
      Message 2 of 9 , May 30, 2009
        No comments on scotch as I don't really like it but I have made what I am calling "rum" since its just a sugar wash and aged in a French Oak barrel for a year and I find the oak has a very sharp/bitter taste as you immediate taste it, after a few seconds it mellows a little and you get other flavours.

        What's the best remedy to remove that sharpness? I guessed sugar for a rum, and it kind of works...

        I would like to know how to make a rum in the style of Mount Gay Eclipse.  (Light, and rather fruity)

        Tom Smith wrote:

        I have tried many things and it seems if you have a sharp tasting distilate just about any thing that you add to it improves it. comments anybody


      • Harry
        Nathan Stanley said... Re: [new_distillers] ageing scotch No comments on scotch as I don t really like it but I have made what I am calling rum since its
        Message 3 of 9 , May 30, 2009
          Nathan Stanley said...

          Re: [new_distillers] ageing scotch


          No comments on scotch as I don't really like it but I have made what I am calling "rum" since its just a sugar wash and aged in a French Oak barrel for a year and I find the oak has a very sharp/bitter taste as you immediate taste it, after a few seconds it mellows a little and you get other flavours.

          What's the best remedy to remove that sharpness? I guessed sugar for a rum, and it kind of works...

          I would like to know how to make a rum in the style of Mount Gay Eclipse. (Light, and rather fruity)



          10ml/litre of Glycerine will work (a higher alcohol; it's naturally produced during long aging). So will airing out a bit before reducing & bottling.

          Re Mount Gay...you're talking an entire process from start to finish, not just a distilling style. See my post on Sherman's AD site...
          http://tinyurl.com/kpn22c

          You'll quickly see what I mean.


          Slainte!
          regards Harry
        • tgfoitwoods
          Nathan, That sounds like un-oxidized wood chemicals you re tasting. Try bubbling filtered air of oxygen for a few minutes through that liquor and let it stand
          Message 4 of 9 , May 30, 2009
            Nathan,

            That sounds like un-oxidized wood chemicals you're tasting. Try bubbling filtered air of oxygen for a few minutes through that liquor and let it stand a day or so. That should oxidize those acerbic wood chemicals, like tannins, to vanillins, for a much softer, nicer flavor.

            Zymurgy Bob, a simple potstiller

            --- In new_distillers@yahoogroups.com, "Harry" <gnikomson2000@...> wrote:
            >
            > Nathan Stanley said...
            >
            > Re: [new_distillers] ageing scotch
            >
            >
            > No comments on scotch as I don't really like it but I have made what I am calling "rum" since its just a sugar wash and aged in a French Oak barrel for a year and I find the oak has a very sharp/bitter taste as you immediate taste it, after a few seconds it mellows a little and you get other flavours.
            >
            > What's the best remedy to remove that sharpness? I guessed sugar for a rum, and it kind of works...
            >
            > I would like to know how to make a rum in the style of Mount Gay Eclipse. (Light, and rather fruity)
            >
            >
            >
            > 10ml/litre of Glycerine will work (a higher alcohol; it's naturally produced during long aging). So will airing out a bit before reducing & bottling.
            >
            > Re Mount Gay...you're talking an entire process from start to finish, not just a distilling style. See my post on Sherman's AD site...
            > http://tinyurl.com/kpn22c
            >
            > You'll quickly see what I mean.
            >
            >
            > Slainte!
            > regards Harry
            >
          • Nathan Stanley
            Bob, I have been reading this a few times about aerating the alcohol. Sounds like a simple thing to do so I ll try it. My brother in law wants to do a scotch
            Message 5 of 9 , May 30, 2009
              Bob,

              I have been reading this a few times about aerating the alcohol. Sounds like a simple thing to do so I'll try it.
              My brother in law wants to do a scotch whisky in a barrel the same as mine. What would we have to alter from how I am doing my rum? We don't want a "rum" and a "scotch" that nearly taste exactly the same, but I guess being aged in the same oak it might be hard to change it.

              Will changing the mash ingredients make a most pronounced change in the flavour of the drink?

              tgfoitwoods wrote:

              Nathan,

              That sounds like un-oxidized wood chemicals you're tasting. Try bubbling filtered air of oxygen for a few minutes through that liquor and let it stand a day or so. That should oxidize those acerbic wood chemicals, like tannins, to vanillins, for a much softer, nicer flavor.

              Zymurgy Bob, a simple potstiller



            • mavnkaf
              My brother in law wants to do a scotch whisky in a barrel the same as mine. What would we have to alter from how I am doing my rum? We don t want a rum and a
              Message 6 of 9 , May 31, 2009
                My brother in law wants to do a scotch whisky in a barrel the same as mine. What would we have to alter from how I am doing my rum? We don't want a "rum" and a "scotch" that nearly taste exactly the same, but I guess being aged in the same oak it might be hard to change it.

                Will changing the mash ingredients make a most pronounced change in the flavour of the drink?

                >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>

                I would say, reseach the differentence between, Mashing for Whisky and Making a wash for Rum. Both can be made with a simular still, but you can't share the same barrel unless you cut up the barrel to make Oak chips and use in the glass bottles as smaller fake barrels, look it up.

                Your brother in law would have his own bottles for Whisky and you would have your own bottles for your Rum, Right?

                Use the search tool in the Yahoo new_distillers web site, just type in key words that relate to what you want to know.

                Cheers
                Marc

                Ps. if this reply is totaly off the mark, then just delete it.
              • mavnkaf
                ... Thanks Harry for the Link to Sherman s site, and about your post! Thank you. Double Retorts are in my sights. Do you think 5 liter pressure cooker pots
                Message 7 of 9 , May 31, 2009
                  --- In new_distillers@yahoogroups.com, "Harry" <gnikomson2000@...> wrote

                  > Re Mount Gay...you're talking an entire process from start to finish, not just a distilling style. See my post on Sherman's AD site...
                  > http://tinyurl.com/kpn22c
                  >
                  > You'll quickly see what I mean.
                  >
                  >
                  > Slainte!
                  > regards Harry
                  >


                  Thanks Harry for the Link to Sherman's site, and about your post! Thank you.

                  Double Retorts are in my sights. Do you think 5 liter pressure cooker pots be Ok for the retorts, being alloy? (easy), Or go for real and fab some thing up from the scrap yard? I think I've already answered my own question? But what do you think about 5 liters per retort say with a fifty liter boiler?

                  Also what do think about 25 mm tubes from boiler to retort to retort to condenser? Now that I think of it can you make it for me:) Not, I think I've got some home work to do.

                  Cheers
                  Marc
                • Nathan Stanley
                  mavnkaf wrote: Yes we have two separate barrels that are both French oak. Maybe I didn t explain that clear enough. I will will make him do the work for the
                  Message 8 of 9 , May 31, 2009
                    mavnkaf wrote:

                    Yes we have two separate barrels that are both French oak. Maybe I didn't explain that clear enough. I will will make him do the work for the scotch as I probably won't drink it.

                    The hardest part I find with the recipes on the homedistiller website is that I don't know what the local names are for the ingredients used. I will have to ask on here when it comes to buying time.
                  • tgfoitwoods
                    Catfish, It s true that all oak-aged liquors have *some* flavors in common, and it s also true that the flavors that come over from the wash are very delicate,
                    Message 9 of 9 , May 31, 2009
                      Catfish,

                      It's true that all oak-aged liquors have *some* flavors in common, and it's also true that the flavors that come over from the wash are very delicate, but you can still taste the difference between a Scotch and a rum.

                      One of the aspects of my distilling that I'm working on improving, is bringing over more and stronger flavors from a potstill wash.

                      I hope this helps.

                      Zymurgy Bob, a simple potstiller
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