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Whiskey from liquid malt.

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  • mattdistiller
    Hi again everyone, About a month ago, I was trying to get some info on making whiskey from liquid malt. I ve got Jack s reecipe from Tony s site (which is
    Message 1 of 5 , Mar 31 5:45 PM
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      Hi again everyone,

      About a month ago, I was trying to get some info on making whiskey
      from liquid malt. I've got Jack's reecipe from Tony's site (which is
      pasted at the end of this message). I recall that a few of you were
      having a go at this - How did it go? Any problems? What were the
      results like?

      Now to my real questions:
      1. Did anyone add sugar/nutrients to the wash? And/or does anyone
      have a breakdown of the malt's content (sugar/nutrient levels)?
      2. For the Scotch, Jack says to use "peated malt (grains)" - anyone
      know where to get these in Australia? What are they? Can I make my
      own?
      3. Did people use a pot still or a nixon-stone? I've got a n/s as
      you will probably recall, and have done a great rum through it. I
      was going to do this the same way, using the instructions from the
      corn whiskey book as Jack suggests. But, I'd be interested in what
      any pot stillers had to say about their results.
      4. From the recipe as stated, what volume yield did you get?
      5. What type of yeasts have people been using? And what is the best
      for whiskey's? I've used EC 1118 for the mollasses and citrus
      washes, with great results - would this be suitable?

      Thanks in advance, and happy easter!

      Matt (Bris)

      --- Jack's liquid malt whiskey recipe ---
      --- From homedistiller.org ---

      Bring about five gallons of water to a good boil, then add 12 pounds
      of (unhopped!!!) pale malt syrup and dissolve it, then boil it for a
      good 15 minutes, then cool (I use a wort chiller, it takes me 20
      minutes to get this much water down to a pitching temp)- pitch with
      either 60 grams of dry bread yeast, or any ale or lager yeast that
      (This is important) has a reputation for producing low to no amounts
      of esters (these are nasty in whiskey). after about 3 to 4 days
      distill it and make the cut according to the corn whiskey book. I put
      mine in a bottle with some toasted American oak chips, diluted down
      to 50%abv - The best malt whiskey I have had in a long time! YOU HAVE
      GOT TO TRY THIS !!! (yeah, I know, three exlamation points- the sign
      of a true madman-trust me anyway). The next experiment is to steep 50
      to 100 grams of peated malt (grains) in the 5 gals of water (at 155F
      for 45minutes) before bringing to a boil and adding the malt syrup-
      You guessed it- SCOTCH!!! and IRISH WHISKY from a store bought still
      (a eurostill) and maybe an hour or two of stove work- no mashing
      temps, no worrying about water hardness or Ph or iron content-
      simple, easy- you gotta love it.

      Update ! ... Just tried out something new- if you add 3 tablets
      (dissolved in a little water) of Beano- (it's found in the pharmacy-
      it's an enzyme that breaks down long chain starches into short chain
      sugars to help with gas problems) to the malt whisky mash recipe -
      it'll increase alcohol yields a little (like 2-3%) as well as make
      the stuff less likely to foam in the still- also, if you have a twin
      element still, let it heat up on the lower setting to slow down the
      heat up time and prevent foaming even more ( I even add a half
      teaspoon of mineral oil to break up the foaming - it's a lot of
      work to keep malt syrup mashes from foaming in a still) A variable
      power setting would also be helpfull.
    • ups474@aol.com
      If you look around that section of homedistiller.org a little more you will find that I posted instructions on how to peat your own malt if you can t get it
      Message 2 of 5 , Apr 1, 2002
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        If you look around that section of homedistiller.org a little more you will
        find that I posted instructions on how to peat your own malt if you can't get
        it where you are.
      • mattdistiller
        ... you will ... can t get ... Thanks - I don t know how I missed it - Its right at the top! Thanks, I ve now printed out the whole thing, and your vast info
        Message 3 of 5 , Apr 2, 2002
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          --- In new_distillers@y..., ups474@a... wrote:
          > If you look around that section of homedistiller.org a little more
          you will
          > find that I posted instructions on how to peat your own malt if you
          can't get
          > it where you are.

          Thanks - I don't know how I missed it - Its right at the top!
          Thanks, I've now printed out the whole thing, and your vast info that
          Tony has put up there will be great! This years two major projects
          are a scotch and a bourbon, and all your info will give me a good
          head start!

          Thanks again,

          Matt
        • John Vandermeulen
          mattdistiller wrote: Hi again everyone, ... peated malt is barley that has been malted (i.e. allow to germinate and sprout), and then heated to kill/stop the
          Message 4 of 5 , Apr 3, 2002
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            mattdistiller wrote:
            Hi again everyone,
            Now to my real questions:
            1.  Did anyone add sugar/nutrients to the wash?  And/or does anyone
            have a breakdown of the malt's content (sugar/nutrient levels)?
            2.  For the Scotch, Jack says to use "peated malt (grains)" - anyone
            know where to get these in Australia?  What are they?  Can I make my
            own?
            peated malt is barley that has been malted (i.e. allow to germinate and sprout), and then heated to kill/stop the sprouting.  During this sprouting process the barley germinal tissue releases an enzyme that converts the storage starch to maltose, the sugar we then convert into alcohol.  The heating stage is done with a lot of peat smoke (primarily phenolic compounds), which adheres to the malted barley, and imparts the 'smokey' pungency to the final product - scotch whisky.In scotch whisky recipes, whether all-grain or partly malt syrup, typically 1/10 (approx.) is peated barley malt.  The rest is non-peated.
            Peated barley malt should be available at the larger brew-supply places.  I can buy it here even out here, in Nova Scotia.
            Can you make your own? Yes - ups posted a recipe a few weeks or months ago - check the archives.

            Good luck, John V

          • Brad McMahon
            ... Unfortunately not available in Australia. We have only had access to imported malts within the last year and boy are they expensive. We can get Weyermann
            Message 5 of 5 , Apr 3, 2002
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              At 11:17 PM 3/04/02, you wrote:
              >mattdistiller wrote:
              >>2. For the Scotch, Jack says to use "peated malt (grains)" - anyone
              >>know where to get these in Australia? What are they? Can I make my
              >>own?
              >
              >Peated barley malt should be available at the larger brew-supply
              >places. I can buy it here even out here, in Nova Scotia.

              Unfortunately not available in Australia. We have only had access to imported
              malts within the last year and boy are they expensive. We can get
              Weyermann Rauchmalz; that is beechwood smoked.
              Here, you will have to make your own, using peat moss from
              your local garden centre. Use regular pale malt and smoke it
              on the Weber BBQ using the peat moss.
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