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Corn Starch

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  • nonamedistiller
    Hello Group.. Back for one more question, Hope this one doesn t get me the Dram award or what ever its called, Ok Does anyone know how much 1 lb of corn starch
    Message 1 of 10 , Jan 2, 2009
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      Hello Group..
      Back for one more question, Hope this one doesn't get me the Dram
      award or what ever its called,

      Ok Does anyone know how much 1 lb of corn starch is equal to.
      What amount of corn is this equal too,, Doesn't have to match the
      pound figure, If anyone knows a round about, I think I can do the math
      to figure out my poundage.. Right now I have a two pound box my wife
      brought home, And I was considering making a small batch to test with<
      BUt I am not so sure how much this would equal too, ANd then maybe
      even scale it up a little, I have heard though that its too fine to
      use, And again was wondering if anyone else uses corn starch,
      Thanks for any tips. NoName
    • Trid
      ... While I don t have the answer to this question, I really like it. I ve actually considered the potential, but never put it to the test. So, here s what I
      Message 2 of 10 , Jan 2, 2009
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        --- In new_distillers@yahoogroups.com, "nonamedistiller"
        <nonamedistiller@...> wrote:
        >
        > Hello Group..
        > Back for one more question, Hope this one doesn't get me the Dram
        > award or what ever its called,
        >
        > Ok Does anyone know how much 1 lb of corn starch is equal to.
        > What amount of corn is this equal too,, Doesn't have to match the
        > pound figure, If anyone knows a round about, I think I can do the math
        > to figure out my poundage.. Right now I have a two pound box my wife
        > brought home, And I was considering making a small batch to test with<
        > BUt I am not so sure how much this would equal too, ANd then maybe
        > even scale it up a little, I have heard though that its too fine to
        > use, And again was wondering if anyone else uses corn starch,
        > Thanks for any tips. NoName

        While I don't have the answer to this question, I really like it.
        I've actually considered the potential, but never put it to the test.

        So, here's what I suggest (and I think I'm going to give it a whirl
        soon, too): Make a combination mash of barley malt (6 row if you can
        get it, but 2 row will do the trick) and your starch. Now this is
        just an off-the-top-of-my-head starting point. Dissolve one pound of
        starch in cold water (cold is important)-maybe 2 gallons- and then
        heat up your starch water like you're heating water for mashing your
        barley. When you reach your desired strike temp (say 165-ish) add two
        pounds of malt. Mash it like you do all-grain (sparging isn't
        necessary if you're wanting to ferment on the grain) and ultimately,
        test the gravity of some clarified wort to see what you've got. You
        can also follow up with the iodine test to see if you have full
        conversion.

        No, it's not too fine to work, it's just a matter of being able to get
        it completely dissolved in the water...that's why adding it to cold
        water first is important. Starch by itself doesn't dissolve in hot
        water, it just lumps up. If you get a nearly full conversion of the
        powdered starch, it simply becomes sugar and is dissolved in the water
        and you could feasibly sparge it clear from your grain husks.
        However, the possibility of some going unconverted and coming through
        into your wort is one reason it's not practical for beer brewing.
        Another handy bit - if you're fermenting on the grain, you just let it
        cool naturally and the enzymes from the malt keep on working.

        Give it a shot, and when I get a chance to do the same, I'll toss my
        results out there for feedback as well.

        Happy starching :)

        Trid
      • rye_junkie1
        ... I have been scull scratchin on this subject as well for a month or so. Enough so that even my wife asks me if I m ready to try it yet when we pass by the
        Message 3 of 10 , Jan 2, 2009
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          --- In new_distillers@yahoogroups.com, "Trid" <triddlywinks@...> wrote:
          >
          > --- In new_distillers@yahoogroups.com, "nonamedistiller"
          > <nonamedistiller@> wrote:
          > >
          > > Hello Group..
          > > Back for one more question, Hope this one doesn't get me the Dram
          > > award or what ever its called,
          > >
          > > Ok Does anyone know how much 1 lb of corn starch is equal to.



          > While I don't have the answer to this question, I really like it.
          > I've actually considered the potential, but never put it to the test.
          >
          > So, here's what I suggest (and I think I'm going to give it a whirl
          > soon, too): Make a combination mash of barley malt (6 row if you can
          > get it, but 2 row will do the trick) and your starch. Now this is
          > just an off-the-top-of-my-head starting point. Dissolve one pound of
          > starch in cold water (cold is important)-maybe 2 gallons- and then
          > heat up your starch water like you're heating water for mashing your
          > barley. When you reach your desired strike temp (say 165-ish) add two
          > pounds of malt. Mash it like you do all-grain (sparging isn't
          > necessary if you're wanting to ferment on the grain) and ultimately,
          > test the gravity of some clarified wort to see what you've got. You
          > can also follow up with the iodine test to see if you have full
          > conversion.
          >
          > No, it's not too fine to work, it's just a matter of being able to get
          > it completely dissolved in the water...that's why adding it to cold
          > water first is important. Starch by itself doesn't dissolve in hot
          > water, it just lumps up. If you get a nearly full conversion of the
          > powdered starch, it simply becomes sugar and is dissolved in the water
          > and you could feasibly sparge it clear from your grain husks.
          > However, the possibility of some going unconverted and coming through
          > into your wort is one reason it's not practical for beer brewing.
          > Another handy bit - if you're fermenting on the grain, you just let it
          > cool naturally and the enzymes from the malt keep on working.
          >
          > Give it a shot, and when I get a chance to do the same, I'll toss my
          > results out there for feedback as well.
          >
          > Happy starching :)
          >
          > Trid
          >

          I have been scull scratchin on this subject as well for a month or so.
          Enough so that even my wife asks me if I'm ready to try it yet when we
          pass by the stuff in the grocery store. Thanks for the heads up on
          the cold water. I saw an interesting bit on this stuff on the
          Discovery show Time Warp. Those guys took a couple thousand pounds of
          the stuff mixed with water in a cement mixer truck and had some fun
          with it. As long as they stayed moving quickly on it they were able
          to walk on top of the stuff but the minute they stopped they were up
          to their hips in the stuff.
          Looks like I'm in on this one as well. However I will be using enzyme
          powder in place of malt. Will use normal mashing method though. The
          stuff is pretty cheap so that makes it easier to play with.

          Mason
        • jamesonbeam1
          Mason, Just remeber that corn starch, while it should be mixed with cold water, is mostly used for a food thickener - especially in chinese cooking (one of my
          Message 4 of 10 , Jan 2, 2009
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            Mason,

            Just remeber that corn starch, while it should be mixed with cold water, is mostly used for a food thickener - especially in chinese cooking (one of my favorites) and also for puddings, etc...

            The minute you start heating it up, expect a nice thick mush LoL.  I would just stick with your regular corn meal and such...

            (note: also remember who we are talking too ;):D:):x)

            Vino es Veritas,

            Jim aka Waldo *the lost one"


            --- In new_distillers@yahoogroups.com, "rye_junkie1" <rye_junkie@...> wrote:
            >
            > --- In new_distillers@yahoogroups.com, "Trid" triddlywinks@ wrote:
            > >
            > > --- In new_distillers@yahoogroups.com, "nonamedistiller"
            > > <nonamedistiller@> wrote:
            > > >
            > > > Hello Group..
            > > > Back for one more question, Hope this one doesn't get me the Dram
            > > > award or what ever its called,
            > > >
            > > > Ok Does anyone know how much 1 lb of corn starch is equal to.
            >
            >
            >
            > > While I don't have the answer to this question, I really like it.
            > > I've actually considered the potential, but never put it to the test.
            > >
            > > So, here's what I suggest (and I think I'm going to give it a whirl
            > > soon, too): Make a combination mash of barley malt (6 row if you can
            > > get it, but 2 row will do the trick) and your starch. Now this is
            > > just an off-the-top-of-my-head starting point. Dissolve one pound of
            > > starch in cold water (cold is important)-maybe 2 gallons- and then
            > > heat up your starch water like you're heating water for mashing your
            > > barley. When you reach your desired strike temp (say 165-ish) add two
            > > pounds of malt. Mash it like you do all-grain (sparging isn't
            > > necessary if you're wanting to ferment on the grain) and ultimately,
            > > test the gravity of some clarified wort to see what you've got. You
            > > can also follow up with the iodine test to see if you have full
            > > conversion.
            > >
            > > No, it's not too fine to work, it's just a matter of being able to get
            > > it completely dissolved in the water...that's why adding it to cold
            > > water first is important. Starch by itself doesn't dissolve in hot
            > > water, it just lumps up. If you get a nearly full conversion of the
            > > powdered starch, it simply becomes sugar and is dissolved in the water
            > > and you could feasibly sparge it clear from your grain husks.
            > > However, the possibility of some going unconverted and coming through
            > > into your wort is one reason it's not practical for beer brewing.
            > > Another handy bit - if you're fermenting on the grain, you just let it
            > > cool naturally and the enzymes from the malt keep on working.
            > >
            > > Give it a shot, and when I get a chance to do the same, I'll toss my
            > > results out there for feedback as well.
            > >
            > > Happy starching :)
            > >
            > > Trid
            > >
            >
            > I have been scull scratchin on this subject as well for a month or so.
            > Enough so that even my wife asks me if I'm ready to try it yet when we
            > pass by the stuff in the grocery store. Thanks for the heads up on
            > the cold water. I saw an interesting bit on this stuff on the
            > Discovery show Time Warp. Those guys took a couple thousand pounds of
            > the stuff mixed with water in a cement mixer truck and had some fun
            > with it. As long as they stayed moving quickly on it they were able
            > to walk on top of the stuff but the minute they stopped they were up
            > to their hips in the stuff.
            > Looks like I'm in on this one as well. However I will be using enzyme
            > powder in place of malt. Will use normal mashing method though. The
            > stuff is pretty cheap so that makes it easier to play with.
            >
            > Mason
            >

          • nonamedistiller
            Hello Trid, And thanks for your reply,, Indeed I will give it a shot and post my results as well, I too was thinking kinda on your same line but hoped that
            Message 5 of 10 , Jan 3, 2009
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              Hello Trid,
              And thanks for your reply,,
              Indeed I will give it a shot and post my results as well,
              I too was thinking kinda on your same line but hoped that someone
              had already tried it,,
              On the flop side I may have to go with your style. I was planning on
              using powder enzymes since I have 2 pounds of each.. Alpha and
              Glucos..
              But After reading your reply there I am thinking maybe I should use
              malt Just for the flavor aspect,,
              either way though I will let you know what I come up with if you do
              the same,

              THanks very much And have a wonderfull day,,
              NoNameDistiller..


              > While I don't have the answer to this question, I really like it.
              > I've actually considered the potential, but never put it to the
              test.
              >
              > So, here's what I suggest (and I think I'm going to give it a whirl
              > soon, too): Make a combination mash of barley malt (6 row if you
              can
              > get it, but 2 row will do the trick) and your starch. Now this is
              > just an off-the-top-of-my-head starting point. Dissolve one pound
              of
              > starch in cold water (cold is important)-maybe 2 gallons- and then
              > heat up your starch water like you're heating water for mashing your
              > barley. When you reach your desired strike temp (say 165-ish) add
              two
              > pounds of malt. Mash it like you do all-grain (sparging isn't
              > necessary if you're wanting to ferment on the grain) and ultimately,
              > test the gravity of some clarified wort to see what you've got. You
              > can also follow up with the iodine test to see if you have full
              > conversion.
              >
              > No, it's not too fine to work, it's just a matter of being able to
              get
              > it completely dissolved in the water...that's why adding it to cold
              > water first is important. Starch by itself doesn't dissolve in hot
              > water, it just lumps up. If you get a nearly full conversion of the
              > powdered starch, it simply becomes sugar and is dissolved in the
              water
              > and you could feasibly sparge it clear from your grain husks.
              > However, the possibility of some going unconverted and coming
              through
              > into your wort is one reason it's not practical for beer brewing.
              > Another handy bit - if you're fermenting on the grain, you just let
              it
              > cool naturally and the enzymes from the malt keep on working.
              >
              > Give it a shot, and when I get a chance to do the same, I'll toss my
              > results out there for feedback as well.
              >
              > Happy starching :)
              >
              > Trid
              >
            • nonamedistiller
              ... one as well. However I will be using enzyme ... The ... Yes sir,, I saw that one as well,.. It was pretty cool. Sure would have like to have that Batch
              Message 6 of 10 , Jan 3, 2009
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                --- In new_distillers@yahoogroups.com, "rye_junkie1" <rye_junkie@...>
                wrote:
                >
                > --- In new_distillers@yahoogroups.com, "Trid" <triddlywinks@> wrote:
                > >
                one as well. However I will be using enzyme
                > powder in place of malt. Will use normal mashing method though.
                The
                > stuff is pretty cheap so that makes it easier to play with.
                >
                > Mason
                >

                Yes sir,,
                I saw that one as well,..
                It was pretty cool. Sure would have like to have that Batch after
                they were done with it, Could have added a few bricks of enzymes and
                went to town,/
                Umm.. while I have you here Mason, I've seen that your pretty
                skilled your self, So could you maybe give me an estimated guess of
                how much water to start out with per lets say 2 pounds,
                I almost started mine a few minutes ago, But I can't decide what
                to start out with, I don't want to over dilute the mash,
                But with that show in mind, Wouldn't I want to have a stiff mash
                like that to start, Then add Malt or enzymes, then after that It
                should thin out a bit if I am thinking correctly.. anyways Sorry
                to be a pest, this one is a new one one myself, And I'm not wanting
                to screw it up the first time around, Even though I know that's what
                its all about. But as soon as I get up the nerve it will be done.
                And I'll post my results, (Really My hold up is, I am not sure
                how much room it will consume, Can't decide weather to break out the
                big 15 gallon pot. Or if I can use my 20 quart pot, I know 2 pounds
                of starch isn't going to grow to fill the 15 gallons, But I for sure
                don't want to get kicked out of my kitchen by the wife for over
                boiling in the smaller one, LOL either way, We will get it done
                somehow, Thanks for all you guy's help on this one, I thought for
                sure I was going to get the ol Dram award for this topic.
                NoName
              • nonamedistiller
                ... water, ... (one ... [:x] ) ... Thanks You too Jim, I didn t catch this post/reply before repling back to masons post. with that said, Mason I suppose I am
                Message 7 of 10 , Jan 3, 2009
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                  --- In new_distillers@yahoogroups.com, "jamesonbeam1"
                  <jamesonbeam1@...> wrote:
                  >
                  >
                  > Mason,
                  >
                  > Just remeber that corn starch, while it should be mixed with cold
                  water,
                  > is mostly used for a food thickener - especially in chinese cooking
                  (one
                  > of my favorites) and also for puddings, etc...
                  >
                  > The minute you start heating it up, expect a nice thick mush LoL. I
                  > would just stick with your regular corn meal and such...
                  >
                  > (note: also remember who we are talking too [;)] [:D] [:)]
                  [:x] )
                  >
                  > Vino es Veritas,
                  >
                  > Jim aka Waldo *the lost one"
                  >

                  Thanks You too Jim,
                  I didn't catch this post/reply before repling back to masons post.
                  with that said, Mason I suppose I am good and don't need any
                  measurements, By the looks of it Corn starch isn't going to be a
                  good source of sugars. But rather a tasty pudding,LOL any how Thanks
                  for all the information you guys Gave.
                  NoName
                  (am I out of place or a drag to the group. If so kindly ask and I
                  will resign,) (Not sure if that last comment was for me, but if it
                  was,then I am not trying to intrude anymore than I have,)
                • rye_junkie1
                  ... No golden Dram from me. This one is interesting to me as well but as for your question of where to start, I dont have a real good idea myself. For me
                  Message 8 of 10 , Jan 3, 2009
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                    --- In new_distillers@yahoogroups.com, "nonamedistiller"
                    <nonamedistiller@...> wrote:

                    > Umm.. while I have you here Mason, I've seen that your pretty
                    > skilled your self, So could you maybe give me an estimated guess of
                    > how much water to start out with per lets say 2 pounds,
                    > I almost started mine a few minutes ago, But I can't decide what
                    > to start out with, I don't want to over dilute the mash,
                    > But with that show in mind, Wouldn't I want to have a stiff mash
                    > like that to start, Then add Malt or enzymes, then after that It
                    > should thin out a bit if I am thinking correctly.. anyways Sorry
                    > to be a pest, this one is a new one one myself, And I'm not wanting
                    > to screw it up the first time around, Even though I know that's what
                    > its all about.
                    > NoName
                    >

                    No golden Dram from me. This one is interesting to me as well but as
                    for your question of where to start, I dont have a real good idea
                    myself. For me though, I picked up a pound today and will try it
                    tomorrow. I will start with that to 2 gallons of water and go from
                    there. If the SG is too high I will add more water. Too low and I
                    would need to add more corn starch. Either way I have an answer to
                    post. As you say, "thats what its all about".

                    Mason
                    Either that or the Hokey Pokey.
                    Reflux run Over 35 hours. Yeah, thats a long time.
                  • JerryM
                    I was in Wal-Mart today and noticed that all natural corn starch was $1.00 a pound. I checked the label and at a glance it did not appear that it contained a
                    Message 9 of 10 , Feb 22, 2011
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                      I was in Wal-Mart today and noticed that all natural corn starch was $1.00 a pound. I checked the label and at a glance it did not appear that it contained a load of preservatives.

                      I was wondering if anyone has ever tried to convert corn starch to sugar using amylase enzymes and then fermenting and distilling the converted starch to produce corn likker?
                    • Ric Cunningham
                      I would think it would work similar to Potato flakes for vodka production. just mix the starch with enough water at the correct temperature and let it do its
                      Message 10 of 10 , Feb 23, 2011
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                        I would think it would work similar to Potato flakes for vodka production. just mix the starch with enough water at the correct temperature and let it do its thing. 

                        On Tue, Feb 22, 2011 at 8:16 PM, JerryM <jkmccull@...> wrote:
                         

                        I was in Wal-Mart today and noticed that all natural corn starch was $1.00 a pound. I checked the label and at a glance it did not appear that it contained a load of preservatives.

                        I was wondering if anyone has ever tried to convert corn starch to sugar using amylase enzymes and then fermenting and distilling the converted starch to produce corn likker?




                        --
                        If you can make macaroni and cheese from a box, you can make a great beer.
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