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beer keg

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  • Michael Spottswood
    I am pondering the idea of using an old beer keg for a boiler. Trouble is, it seems that all of the beer kegs around here are made of aluminum but I cannot
    Message 1 of 12 , Mar 9 11:30 PM
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      I am pondering the idea of using an old beer keg for a boiler. Trouble is,
      it seems that all of the beer kegs around here are made of aluminum but I
      cannot tell for sure. Is there a good way to check? I know idealy they are
      not either attracted to a magnet. They are both electrical conductors too.
      Is there even such a thing as an aluminum keg? The kegs are dull and
      scratched up so they look more like aluminum than stainless. Well, any
      comments appreciated as always.

      Mike

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    • peter_vcb
      ... but I ... they are ... conductors too. good stainless steel (304 and 316) is not magnetic. ... i ve never seen one out my way. to test for aluminium file
      Message 2 of 12 , Mar 10 4:44 AM
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        > it seems that all of the beer kegs around here are made of aluminum
        but I
        > cannot tell for sure. Is there a good way to check? I know idealy
        they are
        > not either attracted to a magnet. They are both electrical
        conductors too.

        good stainless steel (304 and 316) is not magnetic.

        > Is there even such a thing as an aluminum keg?

        i've never seen one out my way.

        to test for aluminium file some of the metal off into a glass. in
        another glass put some sodium hydroxide a.k.a. caustic soda aka lye
        aka drain cleaner. add some water to this carefully it will dissolve
        your skin if in contact, use gloves and goggles. add some of the
        metal filings into the mixture if it reacts (fizzes gives of gas) it
        is aluminium if not its stainless. do this outside the gas given off
        is hydrogen, extremely flammable!

        a safer bet is just to use the aluminium keg, it is ok to use
        aluminium in your still!
      • dave trunks
        just feel the weight of them mike.........stainless beer barrels are heavy buggers........and aluminium would be very light............i think it unlikely they
        Message 3 of 12 , Mar 15 6:47 PM
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          just feel the weight of them mike.........stainless beer barrels are heavy
          buggers........and aluminium would be very light............i think it
          unlikely they would be aluminium......and yes
          if they are stainless they are ideal boilers...............i have made
          several quite successfull "water purifiers" out of them:)

          -----Original Message-----
          From: Michael Spottswood [mailto:mikespotts@...]
          Sent: Saturday, 9 March 2002 11:31
          To: new_distillers@yahoogroups.com
          Subject: [new_distillers] beer keg


          I am pondering the idea of using an old beer keg for a boiler. Trouble is,
          it seems that all of the beer kegs around here are made of aluminum but I
          cannot tell for sure. Is there a good way to check? I know idealy they are
          not either attracted to a magnet. They are both electrical conductors too.
          Is there even such a thing as an aluminum keg? The kegs are dull and
          scratched up so they look more like aluminum than stainless. Well, any
          comments appreciated as always.

          Mike

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        • Donnie
          is a beer keg to thick to heat with electrick heat?
          Message 4 of 12 , Feb 23, 2013
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            is a beer keg to thick to heat with electrick heat?
          • Jason Schnapp
            Yes I sell controllers to mount an emmersion element in the keg to boil with electric. They range from $275-$375 depending on unit.
            Message 5 of 12 , Feb 24, 2013
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              Yes I sell controllers to mount an emmersion element in the keg to boil with electric. They range from $275-$375 depending on unit.



              From: Donnie <streetroddonnie@...>
              To: new_distillers@yahoogroups.com
              Sent: Saturday, February 23, 2013 3:47 PM
              Subject: [new_distillers] beer keg

               
              is a beer keg to thick to heat with electrick heat?



            • Ric Cunningham
              Plenty of homebrewers have converted half barrel kegs to electric boil kettles. You heat the fluid/mash not the vessel with this method anyway. Insulating the
              Message 6 of 12 , Feb 25, 2013
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                Plenty of homebrewers have converted half barrel kegs to electric boil kettles. You heat the fluid/mash not the vessel with this method anyway. Insulating the outside will improve efficiency.
                 


                 
                On Sat, Feb 23, 2013 at 2:47 PM, Donnie <streetroddonnie@...> wrote:
                 

                is a beer keg to thick to heat with electrick heat?




                --
                US Navy - 100% on watch
              • Derek Hamlet
                ... I use a full size keg (59 litres). I use two heating elements (hot water heater type). One is 220 volts for heat up. The others is 1500watts 110. I use
                Message 7 of 12 , Feb 25, 2013
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                  At 06:06 AM 2/25/2013, you wrote:
                  >
                  >
                  >Plenty of homebrewers have converted half barrel kegs to electric
                  >boil kettles. You heat the fluid/mash not the vessel with this
                  >method anyway. Insulating the outside will improve efficiency.

                  I use a full size keg (59 litres). I use two heating elements (hot
                  water heater type). One is 220 volts for heat up. The others is
                  1500watts 110. I use a variac for temperature control.
                  The keg is a lovely thing. I had the local metalwork shop cut a hole
                  large enough to get my arm in for cleaning, then modified a stainless
                  mixing bowl to clamp on the top. Everything else is copper from the
                  column through the x flow condenser to the final takeoff.
                  I like the large keg because I can do double batches.
                  I usually do the neutral alcohol in one go.
                  Other stuff like whiskey, rum and brandy I run once through at the
                  hell bent for leather speed, then a second run going slowly to both
                  make my cuts and bring across flavors.
                  So, I'm biased. I like the stability of working with a 59 litre kettle.




                  Derek
                • girlguidebiscuit
                  I guess we are talking about stainless steel kegs and not the wooden variety? ... I use a full size keg (59 litres). I use two heating elements (hot water
                  Message 8 of 12 , Feb 25, 2013
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                    I guess we are talking about stainless steel kegs and not the wooden variety?



                    >Plenty of homebrewers have converted half barrel kegs to electric
                    >boil kettles. You heat the fluid/mash not the vessel with this
                    >method anyway. Insulating the outside will improve efficiency.

                    I use a full size keg (59 litres). I use two heating elements (hot
                    water heater type). One is 220 volts for heat up. The others is
                    1500watts 110. I use a variac for temperature control.
                    The keg is a lovely thing. I had the local metalwork shop cut a hole
                    large enough to get my arm in for cleaning, then modified a stainless
                    mixing bowl to clamp on the top. Everything else is copper from the
                    column through the x flow condenser to the final takeoff.
                    I like the large keg because I can do double batches.
                    I usually do the neutral alcohol in one go.
                    Other stuff like whiskey, rum and brandy I run once through at the
                    hell bent for leather speed, then a second run going slowly to both
                    make my cuts and bring across flavors..
                    So, I'm biased. I like the stability of working with a 59 litre kettle.

                    Derek

                  • Bill Rogers
                    yes. and also kegs with heating elements inside of them and not with a hot plate under.
                    Message 9 of 12 , Feb 25, 2013
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                      yes.  and also kegs with heating elements inside of them and not with a hot plate under.


                      On Mon, Feb 25, 2013 at 3:23 PM, <self.adhesive@...> wrote:
                       

                      I guess we are talking about stainless steel kegs and not the wooden variety?



                      >Plenty of homebrewers have converted half barrel kegs to electric
                      >boil kettles. You heat the fluid/mash not the vessel with this
                      >method anyway. Insulating the outside will improve efficiency.

                      I use a full size keg (59 litres). I use two heating elements (hot
                      water heater type). One is 220 volts for heat up. The others is
                      1500watts 110. I use a variac for temperature control.
                      The keg is a lovely thing. I had the local metalwork shop cut a hole
                      large enough to get my arm in for cleaning, then modified a stainless
                      mixing bowl to clamp on the top. Everything else is copper from the
                      column through the x flow condenser to the final takeoff.
                      I like the large keg because I can do double batches.
                      I usually do the neutral alcohol in one go.
                      Other stuff like whiskey, rum and brandy I run once through at the
                      hell bent for leather speed, then a second run going slowly to both
                      make my cuts and bring across flavors..

                      So, I'm biased. I like the stability of working with a 59 litre kettle.

                      Derek


                    • Blackhat-Whitedog
                      the idea is to cut a hole in the side of the keg and install an electrical heating element. a few inches off the bottom.
                      Message 10 of 12 , Feb 25, 2013
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                        the idea is to cut a hole in the side of the keg and install an electrical heating element. a few inches off the bottom.

                        --- On Sat, 2/23/13, Donnie <streetroddonnie@...> wrote:

                        > From: Donnie <streetroddonnie@...>
                        > Subject: [new_distillers] beer keg
                        > To: new_distillers@yahoogroups.com
                        > Date: Saturday, February 23, 2013, 1:47 PM
                        > is a beer keg to thick to heat with
                        > electrick heat?
                        >
                        >
                        >
                        > ------------------------------------
                        >
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                        > FAQ and other information available at http://homedistiller.org
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                      • girlguidebiscuit
                        Does anyone use a combination of propane and electric to heat a ss keg boiler? Propane for the initial heat-up and electric for the distilling. How do you
                        Message 11 of 12 , Feb 26, 2013
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                          Does anyone use a combination of propane and electric to heat a ss keg boiler? Propane for the initial heat-up and electric for the distilling. How do you protect the element?

                          Paul


                           

                          yes.  and also kegs with heating elements inside of them and not with a hot plate under.


                        • RLB
                          It takes me 4 hrs to 5 hrs for a 2 gal run, so I am seriously thinking propane to heat it up to temp then using electric over 165 F. Robert
                          Message 12 of 12 , Feb 26, 2013
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                            It takes me 4 hrs to 5 hrs for a 2 gal run, so I am seriously thinking propane to heat it up to temp then using electric over 165 F.

                            Robert



                            From: "self.adhesive@..." <self.adhesive@...>
                            To: new_distillers@yahoogroups.com
                            Sent: Tuesday, February 26, 2013 10:35 AM
                            Subject: Re: [new_distillers] beer keg

                             
                            Does anyone use a combination of propane and electric to heat a ss keg boiler? Propane for the initial heat-up and electric for the distilling. How do you protect the element?

                            Paul


                             
                            yes.  and also kegs with heating elements inside of them and not with a hot plate under.




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