Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

Re: Fermenter?

Expand Messages
  • jfpf92
    Forgive my n00bness, but as a brewer of other libations, I am always worried about stuff being light-struck , is this not a problem with mash for fermenting?
    Message 1 of 20 , Nov 25, 2008
    • 0 Attachment
      Forgive my n00bness, but as a brewer of other libations, I am always
      worried about stuff being 'light-struck', is this not a problem with
      mash for fermenting? On the other hand, I brew in glass, maybe people
      don't use that... finally time to get my steel conical?
    • Harry
      ... It is certainly something to be aware of. But light strike (aka skunked beer) is not really a problem. Many of our distiller s mashes (for whisky) are
      Message 2 of 20 , Nov 25, 2008
      • 0 Attachment
        --- In new_distillers@yahoogroups.com, "jfpf92" <JamesPerryUSA@...>
        wrote:
        >
        >
        > Forgive my n00bness, but as a brewer of other libations, I am always
        > worried about stuff being 'light-struck', is this not a problem with
        > mash for fermenting? On the other hand, I brew in glass, maybe people
        > don't use that... finally time to get my steel conical?
        >


        It is certainly something to be aware of. But light strike
        (aka 'skunked' beer) is not really a problem. Many of our distiller's
        mashes (for whisky) are essentially a young beer without hops, and
        therein lies the secret.

        What does light-struck mean?
        This is when the beer has been exposed to ultraviolet light for a
        period of time. Hop-derived molecules, called isohumulones, are
        basically ripped apart by UV. Some of these parts bind with sulfur
        atoms (yeast metabolites) to create that "skunk" character, which is
        similar in character to a skunk's natural defense and is such a potent
        compound that parts-per-trillion can be detected and even ruin a beer.

        It's been said that bottled beer can become light-struck in less than
        one minute in bright sun, after a few hours in diffuse daylight, and in
        a few days under normal fluorescent lighting.

        But in order for this to happen at all, the beer needs to contain
        HOPS! No Hops = no isohumulones = no 'skunk'. And that's another good
        reason NOT to use ordinary beer or brewers returns as a still
        charge. :)


        Slainte!
        regards Harry
      • Harry
        ... Further info on Light-Strike here... http://blog.khymos.org/2007/02/16/lightstruck-flavor-in-beer/
        Message 3 of 20 , Nov 25, 2008
        • 0 Attachment


          --- In new_distillers@yahoogroups.com, "Harry" <gnikomson2000@...> wrote:

          > But in order for this to happen at all, the beer needs to contain
          > HOPS! No Hops = no isohumulones = no 'skunk'. And that's another good
          > reason NOT to use ordinary beer or brewers returns as a still
          > charge. :)
          >
          >
          > Slainte!
          > regards Harry
          >

           

          Further info on Light-Strike here...
          http://blog.khymos.org/2007/02/16/lightstruck-flavor-in-beer/

          ...and here...
          http://www3.interscience.wiley.com/journal/85514669/abstract?CRETRY=1&SRETRY=0

           

          Slainte!
          regards Harry

        • jfpf92
          I guess that makes sense for grain-only, however I did note that wines can be struck (and in my experience meads/pyments can be too, certainly), see:
          Message 4 of 20 , Nov 27, 2008
          • 0 Attachment
            I guess that makes sense for grain-only, however I did note that wines
            can be struck (and in my experience meads/pyments can be too,
            certainly), see:

            "Lightstruck wines are those that have had excessive exposure to
            ultraviolet light, particularly in the range 325 to 450 nm[6]. Very
            delicate wines, such as Champagnes, are generally worst affected, with
            the fault causing a wet cardboard or wet wool type flavour and aroma.
            Red wines rarely becomes lightstruck because the phenolic compounds
            present within the wine protects it. Lightstrike is thought to be
            caused by sulfur compounds such as dimethyl sulfide. In France
            lightstrike is known as "goûts de lumière", which translates to tastes
            of light. The fault explains why wines are generally bottled in
            coloured glass, which blocks the ultraviolet light, and why wine
            should be stored in dark environments."

            Just FYI, not trying to one-up....
          Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.