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Re: can you save a over heated/burnt striping run?

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  • abbababbaccc
    Hmm, I ve fixed some scorched whiskey mashes with the procedure I mentioned and it does indeed work. As I recall it there was some really nasty burnt
    Message 1 of 7 , Oct 21, 2008
      Hmm, I've fixed some scorched whiskey mashes with the procedure I
      mentioned and it does indeed work. As I recall it there was some
      really nasty "burnt" smelling stuff coming out at the beginning. It
      could be that I cut those furfurals off as tails or it could be that
      when they mix with all those alcohols the mixture has low boiling
      point.

      Cheers, Riku

      --- In new_distillers@yahoogroups.com, "Harry" <gnikomson2000@...>
      wrote:
      >
      > --- In new_distillers@yahoogroups.com, "abbababbaccc"
      > <abbababbaccc@> wrote:
      > >
      > > You can save most burnt mashes by doing a SLOW redistillation
      with
      > a
      > > GOOD reflux still. Phenols tend to come out at the beginning so
      you
      > > can cut them off.
      > >
      > > Cheers, Riku
      >
      >
      > Phenols are the chemical compounds acquired by malt from peat
      during
      > the kilning process. They are responsible for the peaty flavour of
      > Islay whiskies in particular.
      >
      > Conversely, burnt mashes produce pyrolytic compounds (pyrolysis:
      > Extreme heat without air).
      >
      > Furfural, which is mostly derived from scorching the bran of the
      > grain, or other solids in the wash, is the most common (and nasty)
      > result of a scorched wash. In industry, it is produced by
      scorching
      > corncobs, oats, bran or sawdust in an airless reactor.
      >
      > Furfural is one of the most difficult and costly compounds to
      remove
      > from spirit. It has a boiling point of 161°C. Under normal
      > maturation conditions of whisky, it only makes up 1 to 1.5
      milligrams
      > per litre. But in a burnt mash, it could be more like 1000 times
      > that amount. Carbon filtration has very limited success.
      >
      > If it were me, I'd put it aside as feints and add it back a little
      at
      > a time to the next 10 or so washes I distil. Or just toss it and
      > chalk it up to experience.
      >
      >
      > Slainte!
      > regards Harry
      >
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