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Re: 120volts Through a 220 volt Element - Was:What makes a good boiler?

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  • Sherman
    I snipped a lot off of this thread and I know all this is a bit off topic but... I started fooling around with batteries and motors and all sorts of stuff I
    Message 1 of 26 , Oct 14, 2008
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      I snipped a lot off of this thread and I know all this is a bit off
      topic but...
      I started fooling around with batteries and motors and all sorts of
      stuff I could find in toys back in 1970 at a tender age of 8 years.
      A circuit first made sense to me at 6 years old but I had a bit of
      trouble learning to use a screwdriver and was not allowed to have the
      wire cutters.

      But anyway... I went on to get a BSEE and found that my abstraction of
      electricity is somewhat akin to the paranormal. I won't bother
      explaining that.
      We are all familiar with combinations of things controlling something
      else without really understanding why. For instance, if I pick up
      something somewhat heavy and walk off with it, how heavy it feels has
      more to do with how far I carry it and the grade it has to go up more
      than how much the thing weighs. The distance and the grade control how
      far I am going to carry the thing.
      As distillers we are familiar with the combination of alcohol and
      water. The amount of heat you apply to a boiler doesn't control the
      boiling temperature it is the ratio of water to alcohol that
      determines the boiling temperature(assuming something close to one
      atmosphere).
      With electricity it is the same way. The two fixed things are usually
      the voltage and the resistance. These are the controllers. Current or
      amperage is the controlled part. This is one of the most misunderstood
      concepts in electricity. In order to change the current, you can only
      change one of the other two. That is why I generally only refer to
      wattage in terms of resistance and voltage, because the current is
      going to do what the current does, completely dependent on the
      resistance and the voltage.


      --- In new_distillers@yahoogroups.com, "burrows206"
      <jeffrey.burrows@...> wrote:
      >
      > Hi Harry,
      > Energy conversion is kind of like the kinetic energy of a kick in the
      > nuts which converts into violent electrical impulses flashing across
      > your brain for what seems like an eternity, considering electricity
      > travels at the speed of light it sure can go back and forth for a
      > long time.
      > But your points are well taken and no offence taken either.
      > Geoff
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