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Re: [new_distillers] Re: safety first

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  • jay lagasse
    This is interesting, just yesterday, I bought 2 fire extinguishers.  One for the house, since I burn wood, and one for the enclosed porch I do all my
    Message 1 of 14 , Sep 3, 2008
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      This is interesting, just yesterday, I bought 2 fire extinguishers.  One for the house, since I burn wood, and one for the enclosed porch I do all my distilling in.  The one for the porch is a BC type, good for liquids and electrical.  It's a dry chem deal and I'm sure that despite creating a hell of a mess, I thought it would probably do a decent job of putting out an ethanol fire.  After reading Harry's comment on ethanol being hygroscopic, it makes perfect sense, and  wonder if I'd be safer or better off with just a water type extinguisher.  It would certainly create much less mess (the least important issue, I know, but still...I'd rather deal with water everywhere than choking yellow dust.).  Any opinions?
       
      Jay

      --- On Wed, 9/3/08, Harry <gnikomson2000@...> wrote:
      From: Harry <gnikomson2000@...>
      Subject: [new_distillers] Re: safety first
      To: new_distillers@yahoogroups.com
      Date: Wednesday, September 3, 2008, 7:19 PM

      --- In new_distillers@ yahoogroups. com, "homemade12476"
      <homemade12476@ ...> wrote:
      >
      > a few mins ago i was making a final run with my 1st half gallon
      > capped. i sat it down on the table i collect on not noticeing that
      i
      > left the screwdriver that i used to tighted my cooling hose clamp
      > with.sat the jug on the screwdriver out of the corner of my eye i
      > seen it falling and tried to catch it,knocked it into my propane
      > burner with it running.blue flame every place.i grabed my hose i
      > always keep handy and put it out. i invented a few words i never
      > even heard. but thought about it hell i can make more,thank god it
      > was just a jug.my point is be safe and keep something handy to put
      > out a fire. chris
      >

      Chris,

      You are one very lucky SOB. :)
      Aren't you glad that one of the properties of ethanol is that it's
      HYGROSCOPIC (absorbs water). You reduced the ethanol strength below
      the point where it will burn ( <50% a/v). If you had spilled
      gasoline, your hose would just have spread the burning fuel
      everywhere. Lesson learned, yes???

      Good to know you're sill here. & don't say a word to your insurance
      guy. :-))

      Slainte!
      regards Harry


    • jay lagasse
      Here s a mistake that I ll share:  Started a run yesterday but forgot to turn on the cooling water, it just slipped my mind.  Had the propane burner up
      Message 2 of 14 , Sep 3, 2008
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        Here's a mistake that I'll share:  Started a run yesterday but forgot to turn on the cooling water, it just slipped my mind.  Had the propane burner up pretty high to get up to temp and left the porch to do something else for a few minutes.  Leaving the still unattended with the burner up that high is unsafe to begin with, but I look through the door window occasionally to make sure everything is ok and note the temp on the thermometer.  I always keep the outer porch door halfway open or so, plus one of the porch windows to create a cross-draft.  Anyway, I looked through the door window and noticed that the still was getting up to temp, so I went in the porch to turn the burner down and was almost knocked over by ethanol fumes un-condensed and pouring out the top of the still.  I shut the flame completely and ventilated the room, promply noticing that I had forgotten to turn on the cooling water.
         
        Just that one little missed step caused an ethanol-rich atmosphere in that room and even with the window and outer door open, I suppose the fumes could have gotten thick enough to cause an explosion.
         
        There's one of my close calls.  Glad to still be around.
         
        Jay

        --- On Wed, 9/3/08, rye_junkie1 <rye_junkie@...> wrote:
        From: rye_junkie1 <rye_junkie@...>
        Subject: [new_distillers] Re: safety first
        To: new_distillers@yahoogroups.com
        Date: Wednesday, September 3, 2008, 7:22 PM

        --- In new_distillers@ yahoogroups. com, "homemade12476"
        <homemade12476@ ...> wrote:
        >
        > a few mins ago i was making a final run with my 1st half gallon
        > capped. i sat it down on the table i collect on not noticeing that i
        > left the screwdriver that i used to tighted my cooling hose clamp
        > with.sat the jug on the screwdriver out of the corner of my eye i
        > seen it falling and tried to catch it,knocked it into my propane
        > burner with it running.blue flame every place.i grabed my hose i
        > always keep handy and put it out. i invented a few words i never
        > even heard. but thought about it hell i can make more,thank god it
        > was just a jug.my point is be safe and keep something handy to put
        > out a fire. chris
        >

        Safety is a huge issue with this hobby. I am sure that we have all
        done something at least half stupid at one time or another. I have
        had a full jar of 90% slip from my hand during a run. Months back I
        stopped a reflux run half way through and pulled the stopper at the
        top of the column so it wouldn't collapse the boiler when it cooled
        only to blow the flour seal when I restarted it the next morning. I
        still dont know what happened on that one but I can guarantee it wont
        happen again. And just this past Sunday I was trying out my new
        column and as I said in a previous post, I had 2 cinder blocks
        stacked long ways on top of each other long ways. I time my
        collection rate so that I know how fast I am collecting. I had the
        stop watch hanging on the clamp handle that was clamping the board the
        top of the block. Every single time I went out to change jars I would
        instinctively grab that stop watch wrapped around that clamp and damn
        near pull those blocks down. Stupid, Stupid , Stupid.
        We should all post our mistakes regarding safety. I'm sure we all get
        complacent at one time or another and the jolt back to reality coupled
        with putting some pride away and posting the mistake just may save one
        of us one day.

        Mason


      • homemade12476
        glad everone is ok but 1 last thing dont drink and cook.chris--- In ... forgot to turn on the cooling water, it just slipped my mind.  Had the propane burner
        Message 3 of 14 , Sep 4, 2008
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          glad everone is ok but 1 last thing dont drink and cook.chris--- In
          new_distillers@yahoogroups.com, jay lagasse <ak_jay.1976@...> wrote:
          >
          > Here's a mistake that I'll share:  Started a run yesterday but
          forgot to turn on the cooling water, it just slipped my mind.  Had
          the propane burner up pretty high to get up to temp and left
          the porch to do something else for a few minutes.  Leaving the still
          unattended with the burner up that high is unsafe to begin with, but
          I look through the door window occasionally to make sure everything
          is ok and note the temp on the thermometer.  I always keep the outer
          porch door halfway open or so, plus one of the porch windows to
          create a cross-draft.  Anyway, I looked through the door window and
          noticed that the still was getting up to temp, so I went in the
          porch to turn the burner down and was almost knocked over by ethanol
          fumes un-condensed and pouring out the top of the still.  I shut the
          flame completely and ventilated the room, promply noticing that I
          had forgotten to turn on the cooling water.
          >  
          > Just that one little missed step caused an ethanol-rich atmosphere
          in that room and even with the window and outer door open, I suppose
          the fumes could have gotten thick enough to cause an explosion.
          >  
          > There's one of my close calls.  Glad to still be around.
          >  
          > Jay
          >
          > --- On Wed, 9/3/08, rye_junkie1 <rye_junkie@...> wrote:
          >
          > From: rye_junkie1 <rye_junkie@...>
          > Subject: [new_distillers] Re: safety first
          > To: new_distillers@yahoogroups.com
          > Date: Wednesday, September 3, 2008, 7:22 PM
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >
          > --- In new_distillers@ yahoogroups. com, "homemade12476"
          > <homemade12476@ ...> wrote:
          > >
          > > a few mins ago i was making a final run with my 1st half gallon
          > > capped. i sat it down on the table i collect on not noticeing
          that i
          > > left the screwdriver that i used to tighted my cooling hose
          clamp
          > > with.sat the jug on the screwdriver out of the corner of my eye
          i
          > > seen it falling and tried to catch it,knocked it into my propane
          > > burner with it running.blue flame every place.i grabed my hose i
          > > always keep handy and put it out. i invented a few words i never
          > > even heard. but thought about it hell i can make more,thank god
          it
          > > was just a jug.my point is be safe and keep something handy to
          put
          > > out a fire. chris
          > >
          >
          > Safety is a huge issue with this hobby. I am sure that we have all
          > done something at least half stupid at one time or another. I have
          > had a full jar of 90% slip from my hand during a run. Months back
          I
          > stopped a reflux run half way through and pulled the stopper at
          the
          > top of the column so it wouldn't collapse the boiler when it
          cooled
          > only to blow the flour seal when I restarted it the next morning.
          I
          > still dont know what happened on that one but I can guarantee it
          wont
          > happen again. And just this past Sunday I was trying out my new
          > column and as I said in a previous post, I had 2 cinder blocks
          > stacked long ways on top of each other long ways. I time my
          > collection rate so that I know how fast I am collecting. I had the
          > stop watch hanging on the clamp handle that was clamping the board
          the
          > top of the block. Every single time I went out to change jars I
          would
          > instinctively grab that stop watch wrapped around that clamp and
          damn
          > near pull those blocks down. Stupid, Stupid , Stupid.
          > We should all post our mistakes regarding safety. I'm sure we all
          get
          > complacent at one time or another and the jolt back to reality
          coupled
          > with putting some pride away and posting the mistake just may save
          one
          > of us one day.
          >
          > Mason
          >
        • jamesonbeam1
          Well Actually Ya ll, I bet the Angels were happier then Pigs in chit. Since we are on topics of SNAFUs (situation normal - all f*&ked up - military
          Message 4 of 14 , Sep 4, 2008
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            Well Actually Ya'll,

            I bet the Angels were happier then Pigs in chit.  Since we are on topics of SNAFUs (situation normal - all f*&ked up - military expression..),  My first Golden Dram award was giving to me when I first started out and made my first pot still.  I started it up with about a 15% ABV wash and kept checking....  Nothing came out.....  I figured what the the heck, let me see if theres any leaks...  Took my trusty BIC lighter out and lite it along the lyne arme down to the boiler.....

            Sure enough, when I reached the joint at the boiler (lucky only a 2 gallon one at that time), a huge blue flame shot out and burned my whole hand.  Thank God there was enough back pressure that a simple wet wash cloth put it out and some flour / water mix solved the problem.  But when i mentioned this, I was repremanded soundly by all the MKO's (most knowlegable ones) lol.  Thats where the "Golden Dram" Award started.  Note: finally realized the  correct way to check for leaks is to use a spray bottle with a dish soap solution and see where the bubbles are hehehehe.

            Vino es Veritas,

            Jim.

            PS>  I have also forgot to turn on the condenser water outside my porch while sitting there thinking it was dripping out fine and sipping some hootch - (only for the first 1/4 pint came out - the rest went to the angels:)).

             


            --- In new_distillers@yahoogroups.com, "homemade12476" <homemade12476@...> wrote:
            >
            > glad everone is ok but 1 last thing dont drink and cook.chris--- In
            > new_distillers@yahoogroups.com, jay lagasse ak_jay.1976@ wrote:
            > >
            > > Here's a mistake that I'll share:  Started a run yesterday but
            > forgot to turn on the cooling water, it just slipped my mind.  Had
            > the propane burner up pretty high to get up to temp and left
            > the porch to do something else for a few minutes.  Leaving the still
            > unattended with the burner up that high is unsafe to begin with, but
            > I look through the door window occasionally to make sure everything
            > is ok and note the temp on the thermometer.  I always keep the outer
            > porch door halfway open or so, plus one of the porch windows to
            > create a cross-draft.  Anyway, I looked through the door window and
            > noticed that the still was getting up to temp, so I went in the
            > porch to turn the burner down and was almost knocked over by ethanol
            > fumes un-condensed and pouring out the top of the still.  I shut the
            > flame completely and ventilated the room, promply noticing that I
            > had forgotten to turn on the cooling water.
            > >  
            > > Just that one little missed step caused an ethanol-rich atmosphere
            > in that room and even with the window and outer door open, I suppose
            > the fumes could have gotten thick enough to cause an explosion.
            > >  
            > > There's one of my close calls.  Glad to still be around.
            > >  
            > > Jay
            > >
            > > --- On Wed, 9/3/08, rye_junkie1 rye_junkie@ wrote:
            > >
            > > From: rye_junkie1 rye_junkie@
            > > Subject: [new_distillers] Re: safety first
            > > To: new_distillers@yahoogroups.com
            > > Date: Wednesday, September 3, 2008, 7:22 PM
            > >
            > >
            > >
            > >
            > >
            > >
            > > --- In new_distillers@ yahoogroups. com, "homemade12476"
            > > <homemade12476@ ...> wrote:
            > > >
            > > > a few mins ago i was making a final run with my 1st half gallon
            > > > capped. i sat it down on the table i collect on not noticeing
            > that i
            > > > left the screwdriver that i used to tighted my cooling hose
            > clamp
            > > > with.sat the jug on the screwdriver out of the corner of my eye
            > i
            > > > seen it falling and tried to catch it,knocked it into my propane
            > > > burner with it running.blue flame every place.i grabed my hose i
            > > > always keep handy and put it out. i invented a few words i never
            > > > even heard. but thought about it hell i can make more,thank god
            > it
            > > > was just a jug.my point is be safe and keep something handy to
            > put
            > > > out a fire. chris
            > > >
            > >
            > > Safety is a huge issue with this hobby. I am sure that we have all
            > > done something at least half stupid at one time or another. I have
            > > had a full jar of 90% slip from my hand during a run. Months back
            > I
            > > stopped a reflux run half way through and pulled the stopper at
            > the
            > > top of the column so it wouldn't collapse the boiler when it
            > cooled
            > > only to blow the flour seal when I restarted it the next morning.
            > I
            > > still dont know what happened on that one but I can guarantee it
            > wont
            > > happen again. And just this past Sunday I was trying out my new
            > > column and as I said in a previous post, I had 2 cinder blocks
            > > stacked long ways on top of each other long ways. I time my
            > > collection rate so that I know how fast I am collecting. I had the
            > > stop watch hanging on the clamp handle that was clamping the board
            > the
            > > top of the block. Every single time I went out to change jars I
            > would
            > > instinctively grab that stop watch wrapped around that clamp and
            > damn
            > > near pull those blocks down. Stupid, Stupid , Stupid.
            > > We should all post our mistakes regarding safety. I'm sure we all
            > get
            > > complacent at one time or another and the jolt back to reality
            > coupled
            > > with putting some pride away and posting the mistake just may save
            > one
            > > of us one day.
            > >
            > > Mason
            > >
            >

          • rye_junkie1
            ... I remember that one. And yes there seem to be some happy angels amongst us. I have yet to forget the cooling water but I did in the beginning have a
            Message 5 of 14 , Sep 5, 2008
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              --- In new_distillers@yahoogroups.com, "jamesonbeam1"
              <jamesonbeam1@...> wrote:
              >
              >
              > Well Actually Ya'll,
              >
              > I bet the Angels were happier then Pigs in chit. Since we are on topics
              > of SNAFUs (situation normal - all f*&ked up - military expression..),
              > My first Golden Dram award was giving to me when I first started out and
              > made my first pot still. I started it up with about a 15% ABV wash and
              > kept checking.... Nothing came out..... I figured what the the heck,
              > let me see if theres any leaks... Took my trusty BIC lighter out and
              > lite it along the lyne arme down to the boiler.....
              >
              > Sure enough, when I reached the joint at the boiler (lucky only a 2
              > gallon one at that time), a huge blue flame shot out and burned my whole
              > hand. Thank God there was enough back pressure that a simple wet wash
              > cloth put it out and some flour / water mix solved the problem. But
              > when i mentioned this, I was repremanded soundly by all the MKO's (most
              > knowlegable ones) lol. Thats where the "Golden Dram" Award started.
              > Note: finally realized the correct way to check for leaks is to use a
              > spray bottle with a dish soap solution and see where the bubbles are
              > hehehehe.
              >
              > Vino es Veritas,
              >
              > Jim.


              I remember that one. And yes there seem to be some happy angels
              amongst us. I have yet to forget the cooling water but I did in the
              beginning have a habit of not turning the cooling on until the boiler
              temp reached about 140F. One day I got side tracked on something else
              for a minute or so and then I had on of those "OH CHIT" moments and
              did a sprint to the shop. Yep, More happy angels. From then on the
              cooling water comes on in the beginning.
              I guess the thing that has happened to me the most although not lately
              is a collection jar over flowing. For reflux I set the valve at a set
              rate that is usually 600ml/hour and I keep a close eye on the rig for
              the first hour or so to confirm that rate and make sure everything has
              stabilized so to speak. After that I hang a stop watch around my neck
              and go do whatever I need to do and check on it at least once every hour.
              For Pot stillin though I take a couple extra precautions. The first
              is that Pot stillin requires almost constant attention. If I leave it
              for a few minutes I still have the stop watch so that I can make sure
              I'm not gone long. Second and I think this is important I set my
              collection Jar in a Pie Pan that has sand in it. The sand makes for a
              sturdy platform and if for some reason I do have an over fill the
              distillate doesnt make it very far. The sand soaks it up. I do this
              for spirit runs as I am making cuts with small jars. I usually beer
              strip into a 5 gallon carboy. When its 3/4 full I do a spirit run or
              reflux run.

              Mason
            • billy.turf
              ... i ... I don t don t know how anyone could use an open flame anywhere near a stil, I d be terrified that the house would blow. I always tighten hose clamps
              Message 6 of 14 , Sep 5, 2008
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                --- In new_distillers@yahoogroups.com, "homemade12476"
                <homemade12476@...> wrote:
                >
                > a few mins ago i was making a final run with my 1st half gallon
                > capped. i sat it down on the table i collect on not noticeing that
                i
                > left the screwdriver that i used to tighted my cooling hose clamp
                > with.sat the jug on the screwdriver out of the corner of my eye i
                > seen it falling and tried to catch it,knocked it into my propane
                > burner with it running.blue flame every place.i grabed my hose i
                > always keep handy and put it out. i invented a few words i never
                > even heard. but thought about it hell i can make more,thank god it
                > was just a jug.my point is be safe and keep something handy to put
                > out a fire. chris
                >

                I don't don't know how anyone could use an open flame anywhere near a
                stil, I'd be terrified that the house would blow. I always tighten
                hose clamps up with a 7mm ratchet myself, not a screw driver. One
                time i was filling the cooling and the hoses got crossed, I had not
                used the proper tool for the job and the hose poped off the stil, of
                course nothing was running yet, but if I had of used the proper tool
                on the hose, namely a ratchet, it never would have popped off.

                I know some of you guys use fire, but fire is not so controllable as
                an internal element, not so safe either. I can understand that in the
                short run it's cheaper if you don't have to purchase a heating
                element or whatever, but I think it could be a serious problem if you
                have a leak of alcohol around an open flame.

                I think its maybe better not to introduce fire, then you don't have
                to worry about putting one out! Alcohol vapors tend to explode
                anyways so having something to put out a fire may not help.
              • homemade12476
                bill fire is all i have ever used.and never use it near the house its 75feet from the shed on a slab,not near the house 100 yards away.as far as the right tool
                Message 7 of 14 , Sep 6, 2008
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                  bill fire is all i have ever used.and never use it near the house
                  its 75feet from the shed on a slab,not near the house 100 yards
                  away.as far as the right tool for the job i turn wrenches for a
                  living i can break a hose clamp with a socket or a screwdriver by
                  over tightening.a screwdriver is the proper tool.and as
                  for "{Alcohol vapors tend to explode", the mixture has to be perfect
                  and ignited at the right mixtuer,movies give people the wrong ideas
                  you have a better chance blowing your self up it pressur in your
                  boiler. chris "smoking around gas does not kill people lighting the
                  cig does"--- In new_distillers@yahoogroups.com, "billy.turf"
                  <billy.turf@...> wrote:
                  >
                  > --- In new_distillers@yahoogroups.com, "homemade12476"
                  > <homemade12476@> wrote:
                  > >
                  > > a few mins ago i was making a final run with my 1st half gallon
                  > > capped. i sat it down on the table i collect on not noticeing
                  that
                  > i
                  > > left the screwdriver that i used to tighted my cooling hose
                  clamp
                  > > with.sat the jug on the screwdriver out of the corner of my eye
                  i
                  > > seen it falling and tried to catch it,knocked it into my propane
                  > > burner with it running.blue flame every place.i grabed my hose i
                  > > always keep handy and put it out. i invented a few words i never
                  > > even heard. but thought about it hell i can make more,thank god
                  it
                  > > was just a jug.my point is be safe and keep something handy to
                  put
                  > > out a fire. chris
                  > >
                  >
                  > I don't don't know how anyone could use an open flame anywhere
                  near a
                  > stil, I'd be terrified that the house would blow. I always tighten
                  > hose clamps up with a 7mm ratchet myself, not a screw driver. One
                  > time i was filling the cooling and the hoses got crossed, I had
                  not
                  > used the proper tool for the job and the hose poped off the stil,
                  of
                  > course nothing was running yet, but if I had of used the proper
                  tool
                  > on the hose, namely a ratchet, it never would have popped off.
                  >
                  > I know some of you guys use fire, but fire is not so controllable
                  as
                  > an internal element, not so safe either. I can understand that in
                  the
                  > short run it's cheaper if you don't have to purchase a heating
                  > element or whatever, but I think it could be a serious problem if
                  you
                  > have a leak of alcohol around an open flame.
                  >
                  > I think its maybe better not to introduce fire, then you don't
                  have
                  > to worry about putting one out! Alcohol vapors tend to explode
                  > anyways so having something to put out a fire may not help.
                  >
                • Harry
                  ... Don t look like no movie to me. Stay safe... Slainte! regards Harry When Fire Becomes Master This is what happens in distilleries when fire gets out of
                  Message 8 of 14 , Sep 6, 2008
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                    --- In new_distillers@yahoogroups.com, "homemade12476" <homemade12476@...> wrote:
                    >
                    > bill fire is all i have ever used.and never use it near the house
                    > its 75feet from the shed on a slab,not near the house 100 yards
                    > away.as far as the right tool for the job i turn wrenches for a
                    > living i can break a hose clamp with a socket or a screwdriver by
                    > over tightening.a screwdriver is the proper tool.and as
                    > for "{Alcohol vapors tend to explode", the mixture has to be perfect
                    > and ignited at the right mixtuer,movies give people the wrong ideas
                    > you have a better chance blowing your self up it pressur in your
                    > boiler. chris "smoking around gas does not kill people lighting the
                    > cig does"--- In new_distillers@yahoogroups.com, "billy.turf"

                     

                    Don't look like no movie to me.  Stay safe...

                    Slainte!
                    regards Harry

                    When Fire Becomes Master

                    This is what happens in distilleries when fire gets out of control.  Which proves beyond doubt that even the most carefully thought out and rigorously applied safety rules can sometimes not be enough to prevent a catastrophe.

                    The message is clear.  Never become complacent about distilling, and never leave a working still unattended.  Ignore this advice and this could easily be your home.

                    Slainte!
                    regards Harry

                     

                    1997  Heaven Hill Distillery Bardstown Kentucky.

                    This photo is from the 1997 fire at Heaven Hill Distillery. (photos courtesy of The Kentucky Standard).

                    Another photo from the Heaven Hill fire. Kentucky Standard staff members at the scene reported huge fireballs of unburnt alcohol that were forced hundreds of feet into the air until they found oxygen to combust.

                     The warehouse was previously a brewery but had been turned into a gin and vodka distillery prior to the fire.

                    G & J Greenall has been based in the North West since 1761

                    2006  Greenall's Distillery
                    Cheshire England

                    This is what's left after an arsonist set it alight.  Proving once again that alcohol is a highly flammable fuel.  All it needs is air (oxygen) and an ignition source (flame or spark).

                     

                  • homemade12476
                    i do respect the fire but im talking about explosion . blowing up being a movie.the mix would have to be perfect.in an open air enviroment this is not likely.
                    Message 9 of 14 , Sep 6, 2008
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                      i do respect the fire but im talking about explosion ."blowing up"
                      being a movie.the mix would have to be perfect.in an open air
                      enviroment this is not likely. but the fire is. chris
                      --- In new_distillers@yahoogroups.com, "Harry" <gnikomson2000@...>
                      wrote:
                      >
                      >
                      >
                      > --- In new_distillers@yahoogroups.com, "homemade12476"
                      > <homemade12476@> wrote:
                      > >
                      > > bill fire is all i have ever used.and never use it near the
                      house
                      > > its 75feet from the shed on a slab,not near the house 100 yards
                      > > away.as far as the right tool for the job i turn wrenches for a
                      > > living i can break a hose clamp with a socket or a screwdriver
                      by
                      > > over tightening.a screwdriver is the proper tool.and as
                      > > for "{Alcohol vapors tend to explode", the mixture has to be
                      perfect
                      > > and ignited at the right mixtuer,movies give people the wrong
                      ideas
                      > > you have a better chance blowing your self up it pressur in your
                      > > boiler. chris "smoking around gas does not kill people lighting
                      the
                      > > cig does"--- In new_distillers@yahoogroups.com, "billy.turf"
                      >
                      >
                      >
                      >
                      > Don't look like no movie to me. Stay safe...
                      >
                      > Slainte!
                      > regards Harry
                      >
                      > When Fire Becomes Master
                      > This is what happens in distilleries when fire gets out of
                      control.
                      > Which proves beyond doubt that even the most carefully thought out
                      and
                      > rigorously applied safety rules can sometimes not be enough to
                      prevent a
                      > catastrophe.
                      >
                      > The message is clear. Never become complacent about distilling,
                      and
                      > never leave a working still unattended. Ignore this advice and
                      this
                      > could easily be your home.
                      >
                      > Slainte!
                      > regards Harry
                      >
                      > 1997 Heaven Hill Distillery Bardstown Kentucky.
                      > This photo is from the 1997 fire at Heaven Hill Distillery.
                      (photos
                      > courtesy of The Kentucky Standard).
                      > Another photo from the Heaven Hill fire. Kentucky Standard staff
                      > members at the scene reported huge fireballs of unburnt alcohol
                      that
                      > were forced hundreds of feet into the air until they found oxygen
                      to
                      > combust.
                      >
                      >
                      > The warehouse was previously a brewery but had been turned into
                      a gin
                      > and vodka distillery prior to the fire.
                      > G & J Greenall has been based in the North West since 1761
                      > 2006 Greenall's Distillery
                      > Cheshire England
                      > This is what's left after an arsonist set it alight. Proving once
                      again
                      > that alcohol is a highly flammable fuel. All it needs is air
                      (oxygen)
                      > and an ignition source (flame or spark).
                      >
                    • Harry
                      ... I understand what you are saying. But I say this... TEST it, and report back (if you are still capable). We here at these groups are all about newbie s
                      Message 10 of 14 , Sep 6, 2008
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                        --- In new_distillers@yahoogroups.com, "homemade12476"
                        <homemade12476@...> wrote:
                        >
                        > i do respect the fire but im talking about explosion ."blowing up"
                        > being a movie.the mix would have to be perfect.in an open air
                        > enviroment this is not likely. but the fire is. chris


                        I understand what you are saying. But I say this... TEST it, and
                        report back (if you are still capable). We here at these groups are
                        all about newbie's SAFETY. You wanna have that on your concience?
                        Your responsibility? This ain't a pissing contest. This is real
                        life. Why screw around with the real issue just to prove a rather
                        debatable point?

                        We try to give reliable info and advice. Then someone comes along and
                        clouds the issue wiht things that newbies WANNA HEAR because it
                        sounds easier or right up their alley. Later we hear that someone
                        got HURT and then where are the folks that gave the misleading info?
                        NOWHERE IN SIGHT, that's where.

                        FIRE + ETHANOL is SERIOUSLY DANGEROUS! YES it can be managed, but
                        newbies need to be AWARE of the DANGERS. I too have used flame as an
                        energy source to distilling, but it's a tiger in sheep's clothing.
                        Electricity is a much tamer animal for the sizes (personal hobby
                        size, remember?) of distillations we do.

                        Slainte!
                        regards Harry
                      • homemade12476
                        harry, i want them to be safe.thats why i first made this post. maybe this will help the newbies. 1.i use a lose seal at the top of my column if pressure or
                        Message 11 of 14 , Sep 7, 2008
                        • 0 Attachment
                          harry, i want them to be safe.thats why i first made this post.
                          maybe this will help the newbies. 1.i use a lose seal at the top of
                          my column if pressure or fire ever ran up my worm it would blow the
                          2inch seal and shoot flames into the air.2.i dont cook and
                          drink.3.water on hand all the time.4.cook away from your house.5.i
                          never leave i even piss in the bush 20 feet away.
                          as far as a pissing match never wanted one,funny you called this a
                          pissing match and when jessy emailed me i told him that i never
                          wanted one. i dont know who he is but if you2 have a prob with
                          eachother ,keep me out of it....chris --- In
                          new_distillers@yahoogroups.com, "Harry" <gnikomson2000@...> wrote:
                          >
                          > --- In new_distillers@yahoogroups.com, "homemade12476"
                          > <homemade12476@> wrote:
                          > >
                          > > i do respect the fire but im talking about explosion ."blowing
                          up"
                          > > being a movie.the mix would have to be perfect.in an open air
                          > > enviroment this is not likely. but the fire is. chris
                          >
                          >
                          > I understand what you are saying. But I say this... TEST it, and
                          > report back (if you are still capable). We here at these groups
                          are
                          > all about newbie's SAFETY. You wanna have that on your concience?
                          > Your responsibility? This ain't a pissing contest. This is real
                          > life. Why screw around with the real issue just to prove a rather
                          > debatable point?
                          >
                          > We try to give reliable info and advice. Then someone comes along
                          and
                          > clouds the issue wiht things that newbies WANNA HEAR because it
                          > sounds easier or right up their alley. Later we hear that someone
                          > got HURT and then where are the folks that gave the misleading
                          info?
                          > NOWHERE IN SIGHT, that's where.
                          >
                          > FIRE + ETHANOL is SERIOUSLY DANGEROUS! YES it can be managed,
                          but
                          > newbies need to be AWARE of the DANGERS. I too have used flame as
                          an
                          > energy source to distilling, but it's a tiger in sheep's clothing.
                          > Electricity is a much tamer animal for the sizes (personal hobby
                          > size, remember?) of distillations we do.
                          >
                          > Slainte!
                          > regards Harry
                          >
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