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Re: cuts by temp vs. abv

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  • gff_stwrt
    Hi, folks, I was wrong, of course, in the section I have copied from below and pasted here; When liquid falls down the tube, the same amount of liquid flows
    Message 1 of 28 , Aug 2, 2008
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      Hi, folks,

      I was wrong, of course, in the section I have copied from below and
      pasted here;

      "When liquid falls down the tube, the same amount
      of liquid flows over the top of the flask, because
      of the weight of the incoming liquid. Gravity, not the
      'application of force,
      above the level of the force of gravity',
      (just my description, not from some professor)
      which we know as 'pressure'."

      There are TWO separate possible forces at work (or not at work as
      the case may be) here, gravity, and
      'pressure', which we usually know as the presence of a force above
      the level of ATMOSPHERIC PRESSURE.

      The physics professor's job is quite safe!

      Regards,

      The Baker



      --- In new_distillers@yahoogroups.com, "gff_stwrt" <gff_stwrt@...>
      wrote:
      >
      > --- In new_distillers@yahoogroups.com, "rye_junkie1" <rye_junkie@>
      > wrote:
      > >
      > > --- In new_distillers@yahoogroups.com, "gff_stwrt" <gff_stwrt@>
      > wrote:
      > > >
      > > > Hi, folks,
      > > > I don't claim any expertise here; but my suggestion to run
      the
      > new
      > > > product into the bottom of the flask was to ensure continuous
      > mixing
      > > > of the entering product with that already in the flask.
      > > >
      > > > Regards,
      > > >
      > > > The Baker
      > >
      > > As long as there was a break between the output and the tube that
      > went
      > > into the flask so as not to build back pressure that makes more
      > sense
      > > to me now.
      > >
      > > Mason
      >
      > Hi, folks,
      > Just kicking this around....
      >
      > These systems (reflux stills ) are unpressurised.
      > Open to the air at the top of the column.
      >
      > With no, if you will,'forward' pressure there can be no
      > 'back' pressure.
      > With no pressure the product FALLS (travels purely by
      > means of gravity) to the lowest point.
      > This lowest point is the level of the product in the flask.
      >
      > To re-phrase this; with the tube carrying the
      > product from the still reaching nearly to the
      > bottom of the hydrometer flask, the height of
      > the liquid in this tube, in an unpressurised system, will
      > be the same as the liquid in the flask.
      >
      > When liquid falls down the tube, the same amount
      > of liquid flows over the top of the flask, because
      > of the weight of the incoming liquid. Gravity, not the
      > 'application of force,
      > above the level of the force of gravity',
      > (just my description, not from some professor)
      > which we know as 'pressure'.
      >
      > (The only way, just possibly, there could be a
      > partial 'back pressure' is where the diameter of the pipe
      > was inadequate for the volume of the product --
      > thin pipe, high volume; and that would be a design fault,
      > a problem/ potential problem already in existence).
      >
      > And of course the tube must rest ABOVE the bottom of
      > the flask and not ON the bottom or flow would be restricted!)
      >
      > In the case of a pot still, probably the break you
      > suggest is a good idea(as they are not open to the atmosphere
      > except at the outlet end) though in theory it might
      > not be necessary. I don't know enough to say,
      > but it would seem a wise precaution.
      > >
      >
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