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Re: Calculations

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  • jamesonbeam1
    Hey Bill, Good question. There are 2 basic reasons for doing this. The first is for saftety reasons, due to the highly explosive properties of high ABV
    Message 1 of 7 , Jul 1, 2008
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      Hey Bill,

      Good question.  There are 2 basic reasons for doing this.  

      The first is for saftety reasons, due to the highly explosive properties of high ABV alcohol fumes.  The second and main reason are to allow additional flavors to come through in making a whiskey.  I forgot to tell you to use backset (sour mash) instead of water for dilution and  to add to these flavors in my first posting. 

      The concept here, is that on the second (or third) distillation, you want to lower the ABV of the low wines so you wont get such a high ethanol percent on the spirits run.  This allows more of the grain flavors to come through in your final product.  To take this to extremes, if you used a reflux still and distilled up to azeotrophe (95.6%) ABV, you would get a neutral alcohol with NO flavors...

      If you review Tony's Pot still purity chart,  at a 47% ABV level,  20 liters would give you something like this:

      Input your Pot still characteristics

      Initial Volume of Wash L
      Alcohol Content % by volume
      Initial Temperature C
      Power during Heat-up W
      Power during Distillation W
      %Internal Reflux %
      Time-step for calculation min


      Results

      Time to Heat up Still contents

      TimeTempCollectedPurityTotal CollectedTotal Purity

      This would give you more alcohol and less flavors.  By diluting you low wines to 30% or so, it will give you a lower ABV and ability to make finer cuts, like this:

      Input your Pot still characteristics

      Initial Volume of Wash L
      Alcohol Content % by volume
      Initial Temperature C
      Power during Heat-up W
      Power during Distillation W
      %Internal Reflux %
      Time-step for calculation min


      Results

      Time to Heat up Still contents

      TimeTempCollectedPurityTotal CollectedTotal Purity

      As you can see, the overall  ABV after 200 minutes is 64% , which is almost ideal for aging on oak.   Of course keep in mind, your going to doing your cuts to all this so it wont come out exact....

      Harry and Sherman put together some excellent charts during a discussion we had on Whiskey making in Advanced Distillers.  This one gives you an idea of how diluting your low wines will give you a lower ABV in your final spirits run


      Also review this discussion starting with http://groups.yahoo.com/group/Distillers/message/41750  and read Harry' s Article on Dilution of Alcohol :

      http://distillers.tastylime.net/library/Diluting_the_still_charge/

      Hope this helps.

      Vino es Veritas,

      Jim.

       

       

      --- In new_distillers@yahoogroups.com, "daddyman00126" <daddyman00126@...> wrote:
      >
      > I want to thank both you Jim and also Harry for your answers. One
      > final question about the spirit run. Forgive me if you have hit this
      > topic in the past but, why would I delute the low wines with water? I
      > have a pot still and am using propane for heat. I do not have to
      > worry running it dry, or do I?
      >
      > The best for last
      > BILL1BURP

    • daddyman00126
      Thanks for the info Jim I did put aside 2 gallons of backset from my last strip run. So I do have something to dilute my low wines with. I do like the ability
      Message 2 of 7 , Jul 2, 2008
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        Thanks for the info Jim

        I did put aside 2 gallons of backset from my last strip run. So I do
        have something to dilute my low wines with. I do like the ability to
        add more flavor to my low wines, never thought about using backset to
        do it thou.

        Thanks for the tip

        The best for last
        BILL1BURP

        --- In new_distillers@yahoogroups.com, "jamesonbeam1"
        <jamesonbeam1@...> wrote:
        >
        >
        > Hey Bill,
        >
        > Good question. There are 2 basic reasons for doing this.
        >
        > The first is for saftety reasons, due to the highly explosive
        properties
        > of high ABV alcohol fumes. The second and main reason are to allow
        > additional flavors to come through in making a whiskey. I forgot to
        > tell you to use backset (sour mash) instead of water for dilution
        and
        > to add to these flavors in my first posting.
        >
        > The concept here, is that on the second (or third) distillation, you
        > want to lower the ABV of the low wines so you wont get such a high
        > ethanol percent on the spirits run. This allows more of the grain
        > flavors to come through in your final product. To take this to
        > extremes, if you used a reflux still and distilled up to azeotrophe
        > (95.6%) ABV, you would get a neutral alcohol with NO flavors...
        >
        > If you review Tony's Pot still purity chart, at a 47% ABV level,
        20
        > liters would give you something like this:
        >
        >
        > Input your Pot still characteristics
        > Initial Volume of Wash L
        > Alcohol Content % by volume
        > Initial Temperature C
        > Power during Heat-up W
        > Power during Distillation W
        > %Internal Reflux %
        > Time-step for calculation min
        >
        > Results
        > Time to Heat up Still contents
        >
        > Time Temp Collected Purity Total Collected Total Purity
        >
        > This would give you more alcohol and less flavors. By diluting you
        low
        > wines to 30% or so, it will give you a lower ABV and ability to make
        > finer cuts, like this:
        >
        >
        > Input your Pot still characteristics
        > Initial Volume of Wash L
        > Alcohol Content % by volume
        > Initial Temperature C
        > Power during Heat-up W
        > Power during Distillation W
        > %Internal Reflux %
        > Time-step for calculation min
        >
        >
        >
        > Results
        > Time to Heat up Still contents
        >
        >
        >
        > Time Temp Collected Purity Total Collected Total Purity
        >
        > As you can see, the overall ABV after 200 minutes is 64% , which is
        > almost ideal for aging on oak. Of course keep in mind, your going
        to
        > doing your cuts to all this so it wont come out exact....
        >
        > Harry and Sherman put together some excellent charts during a
        discussion
        > we had on Whiskey making in Advanced Distillers. This one gives
        you an
        > idea of how diluting your low wines will give you a lower ABV in
        your
        > final spirits run
        >
        >
        > Also review this discussion starting with
        > http://groups.yahoo.com/group/Distillers/message/41750
        > <http://groups.yahoo.com/group/Distillers/message/41750> and read
        > Harry' s Article on Dilution of Alcohol :
        >
        > http://distillers.tastylime.net/library/Diluting_the_still_charge/
        > <http://distillers.tastylime.net/library/Diluting_the_still_charge/>
        >
        > Hope this helps.
        >
        > Vino es Veritas,
        >
        > Jim.
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
        > --- In new_distillers@yahoogroups.com, "daddyman00126"
        > <daddyman00126@> wrote:
        > >
        > > I want to thank both you Jim and also Harry for your answers. One
        > > final question about the spirit run. Forgive me if you have hit
        this
        > > topic in the past but, why would I delute the low wines with
        water? I
        > > have a pot still and am using propane for heat. I do not have to
        > > worry running it dry, or do I?
        > >
        > > The best for last
        > > BILL1BURP
        >
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