Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.
 

drill bit size

Expand Messages
  • slipthruthecracks
    Hi all, I am building my first still, a bokakob mini from 1.5 inch and getting ready to drill holes for the offtake tube which is 1/4 o.d. tubing and for the
    Message 1 of 6 , Jun 16, 2008
      Hi all,
      I am building my first still, a bokakob mini from 1.5 inch and getting
      ready to drill holes for the offtake tube which is 1/4 o.d. tubing and
      for the caps in the leibig I am adding after the offtake valve..

      Am I over thinking it when I wonder if the 1/4 inch drill bit is the
      proper bit to use or should it be a 1/32nd or so larger for soldering.
      Any and all suggestions welcome.

      One-Eyed Jack
    • jamesonbeam1
      Hey Jack, Most copper tubing is usually 1/8 large on the OD (outside diameter) then the ID. For 1/4 ID, I would use a 3/8 drill. Your best bet is to
      Message 2 of 6 , Jun 16, 2008

        Hey Jack,

        Most copper tubing is usually 1/8" large on the OD (outside diameter) then the ID.  For 1/4 " ID, I would use a 3/8" drill.  Your best bet is to drill a test hole in some scrap metal first and try it...

        Vino es Veritas,

        Jim.

        SizeActual
        outer diameter,
        inches
        Type
        KLM
        Actual inner diameter, inches
        3/81/20.4020.4300.450
        1/25/80.5280.5450.569
        5/83/40.6520.6680.690
        3/47/80.7450.7850.811
        11 1/80.9951.0251.055
        1 3/81.2451.2651.291
        1 5/81.4811.5051.527
        22 1/81.9591.9852.009
        available
        in these forms 
        drawn temper20 foot
        lengths
        20 foot
        lengths
        20 foot
        lengths
        annealed temper60-foot, 100-foot,
        and 200-foot coils
        60-foot, 100-foot,
        and 200-foot coils
        not made


        --- In new_distillers@yahoogroups.com, "slipthruthecracks" <slipthruthecracks@...> wrote:
        >
        > Hi all,
        > I am building my first still, a bokakob mini from 1.5 inch and getting
        > ready to drill holes for the offtake tube which is 1/4 o.d. tubing and
        > for the caps in the leibig I am adding after the offtake valve..
        >
        > Am I over thinking it when I wonder if the 1/4 inch drill bit is the
        > proper bit to use or should it be a 1/32nd or so larger for soldering.
        > Any and all suggestions welcome.
        >
        > One-Eyed Jack
        >

      • Trid
        ... Even simpler, just measure. If your tubing is truly 1/4 OD (as measured) then drill a 1/4 hole. If the tube fits, then it s good for soldering. If the
        Message 3 of 6 , Jun 16, 2008
          --- In new_distillers@yahoogroups.com, "jamesonbeam1"
          <jamesonbeam1@...> wrote:
          >
          >
          > Hey Jack,
          >
          > Most copper tubing is usually 1/8" large on the OD (outside diameter)
          > then the ID. For 1/4 " ID, I would use a 3/8" drill. Your best bet is
          > to drill a test hole in some scrap metal first and try it...

          Even simpler, just measure. If your tubing is truly 1/4" OD (as
          measured) then drill a 1/4" hole. If the tube fits, then it's good
          for soldering. If the tube is too small, a little sanding of the tube
          (which is good for soldering anyway) or a slight bit of reaming the
          hole with your drill bit will be fine. As long as the parts slide
          together, there's adequate clearance for solder. Too loose and the
          solder carries the entire mechanical load of the fitting and may be
          weak or hard to hold steady during soldering, or both.
        • slipthruthecracks
          .. ... Right, I do want to avoid the solder carrying the entire mechanical load of the joint. It is truly 1/4 o.d. so I will use the 1/4 bit. If it is too
          Message 4 of 6 , Jun 16, 2008
            ..
            >
            > Even simpler, just measure. If your tubing is truly 1/4" OD (as
            > measured) then drill a 1/4" hole. If the tube fits, then it's good
            > for soldering. If the tube is too small, a little sanding of the tube
            > (which is good for soldering anyway) or a slight bit of reaming the
            > hole with your drill bit will be fine. As long as the parts slide
            > together, there's adequate clearance for solder. Too loose and the
            > solder carries the entire mechanical load of the fitting and may be
            > weak or hard to hold steady during soldering, or both.
            >

            Right, I do want to avoid the solder carrying the entire mechanical
            load of the joint. It is truly 1/4 o.d. so I will use the 1/4 bit. If
            it is too tight, I'll jump up to 17/64 and try that.

            Thanks for the suggestions. I'll let you know which worked best in my
            testing.

            One-Eyed Jack.
          • alkyjohn
            Hi All -- After 30 years in the copper/brass tube business -- tube is always measured by outside diameter, pipe is measured by inside diameter. So, 1/4
            Message 5 of 6 , Jun 16, 2008
              Hi All --
              After 30 years in the copper/brass tube business -- 'tube' is always
              measured by outside diameter, 'pipe' is measured by inside diameter.
              So, 1/4" copper TUBE as sold in rolls for plumbing or refrigeration
              use is actually .250 OD -- 1/4 copper PIPE sold in as drawn straight
              length for plumbing use is about .312 OD -- K,L,M are all pipe
              designations, so that material will be measured by the nominal ID.
              A note for those looking to form small coils -- 1/4" and 3/8" copper
              tube sold for refrigeration use (will be marked on the package and
              usually will have coil ends capped) is dead soft and certified oil
              free -- bends very well !! The tube sold for water use is usually 'as
              drawn' temper which is still very pliable, but stiffer than the
              refrigeration tube and may have some draw oils present.
              For those who wish to anneal copper -- heat to over 1250 F and the
              material will go to dead soft -- how you quench (water, oil, air
              cool) makes no difference at all in the temper -- but be aware that
              heating to this temperature in air will oxidize the surface (inside
              and outside) causing green to black coloration that can be polished
              off but does not affect the material itself. Unlike many metals,
              copper is either dead soft or hard, no in between stages --
              Hope this useful to seme --
              John








              --- In new_distillers@yahoogroups.com, "jamesonbeam1"
              <jamesonbeam1@...> wrote:
              >
              >
              > Hey Jack,
              >
              > Most copper tubing is usually 1/8" large on the OD (outside
              diameter)
              > then the ID. For 1/4 " ID, I would use a 3/8" drill. Your best
              bet is
              > to drill a test hole in some scrap metal first and try it...
              >
              > Vino es Veritas,
              >
              > Jim.
              >
              > Size Actual
              > outer diameter,
              > inches Type K L M Actual inner diameter, inches 3/8 1/2 0.402
              > 0.430 0.450 1/2 5/8 0.528 0.545 0.569 5/8 3/4 0.652 0.668
              0.690
              > 3/4 7/8 0.745 0.785 0.811 1 1 1/8 0.995 1.025 1.055 1¼ 1 3/8 1.245
              > 1.265 1.291 1½ 1 5/8 1.481 1.505 1.527 2 2 1/8 1.959 1.985 2.009
              > available
              > in these forms drawn temper 20 foot
              > lengths 20 foot
              > lengths 20 foot
              > lengths annealed temper 60-foot, 100-foot,
              > and 200-foot coils 60-foot, 100-foot,
              > and 200-foot coils not made
              >
              >
              > --- In new_distillers@yahoogroups.com, "slipthruthecracks"
              > <slipthruthecracks@> wrote:
              > >
              > > Hi all,
              > > I am building my first still, a bokakob mini from 1.5 inch and
              getting
              > > ready to drill holes for the offtake tube which is 1/4 o.d.
              tubing and
              > > for the caps in the leibig I am adding after the offtake valve..
              > >
              > > Am I over thinking it when I wonder if the 1/4 inch drill bit is
              the
              > > proper bit to use or should it be a 1/32nd or so larger for
              soldering.
              > > Any and all suggestions welcome.
              > >
              > > One-Eyed Jack
              > >
              >
            • slipthruthecracks
              Okay, I drilled and soldered last evening. 17/64 is the size that finally worked for me. I drilled my first hole in an end cap for the leibig with a 1/4 bit
              Message 6 of 6 , Jun 19, 2008
                Okay, I drilled and soldered last evening. 17/64" is the size that
                finally worked for me. I drilled my first hole in an end cap for the
                leibig with a 1/4" bit and the tubing would fit, but I needed nearly
                to hammer the stuff through it was so tight. I took the 17/64" bit and
                just ran it through the already existing hole and the tubing fit
                snugly and soldered in nicely. I imagine the 1/4" could have done the
                same if I had wiggled it around in the hole and used it to slighty
                ream out a slightly larger opening, but it may not have been as round.

                One-Eyed Jack

                --- In new_distillers@yahoogroups.com, "slipthruthecracks"
                <slipthruthecracks@...> wrote:
                >
                > Hi all,
                > I am building my first still, a bokakob mini from 1.5 inch and getting
                > ready to drill holes for the offtake tube which is 1/4 o.d. tubing and
                > for the caps in the leibig I am adding after the offtake valve..
                >
                > Am I over thinking it when I wonder if the 1/4 inch drill bit is the
                > proper bit to use or should it be a 1/32nd or so larger for soldering.
                > Any and all suggestions welcome.
                >
                > One-Eyed Jack
                >
              Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.