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RE: [new_distillers] Aging

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  • KM Services
    Correction, I do fill to the top , but not literally to the brim ( should have phrased that better) I leave about 30mm to 50mm of air space which allows for
    Message 1 of 11 , Jun 2, 2008
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      Correction, I do fill to the “top” , but not literally to the brim ( should have phrased that better) I leave about 30mm to 50mm of air space which allows for shaking up and aerating …my apologies

      This is my opinion and if I am wrong I will be corrected I am sure...

      Cheers

      Ken Mc

       


      From: new_distillers@yahoogroups.com [mailto: new_distillers@yahoogroups.com ] On Behalf Of charlieltc
      Sent: Tuesday, 3 June 2008 9:23 a.m.
      To: new_distillers@yahoogroups.com
      Subject: [new_distillers] Aging

       

      Re new distillers msg KM 29476 and Alex 29472, Clarification from the
      group please. KM suggested that the aging container should be filled to
      the top and then opened, closed and shook periodically. I don't
      understand the advice to fill the container to the top.

    • castillo.alex2008
      1.) I read Harry´s message and it says do not use the air stone for avoiding some glue leaching to the batch; while I´ve seen others using it, any comments?
      Message 2 of 11 , Jun 2, 2008
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        1.) I read Harry´s message and it says do not use the air stone for
        avoiding some glue leaching to the batch; while I´ve seen others
        using it, any comments?

        2.) I use to top my lowwines (with baking soda) to the very top, will
        it matter?



        --- In new_distillers@yahoogroups.com, "KM Services"
        <km_services@...> wrote:
        >
        > Correction, I do fill to the "top" , but not literally to the brim
        ( should
        > have phrased that better) I leave about 30mm to 50mm of air space
        which
        > allows for shaking up and aerating .my apologies
        >
        > This is my opinion and if I am wrong I will be corrected I am
        sure...
        >
        > Cheers
        >
        > Ken Mc
        >
        >
        >
        > _____
        >
        > From: new_distillers@yahoogroups.com
        [mailto:new_distillers@yahoogroups.com]
        > On Behalf Of charlieltc
        > Sent: Tuesday, 3 June 2008 9:23 a.m.
        > To: new_distillers@yahoogroups.com
        > Subject: [new_distillers] Aging
        >
        >
        >
        > Re new distillers msg KM 29476 and Alex 29472, Clarification from
        the
        > group please. KM suggested that the aging container should be
        filled to
        > the top and then opened, closed and shook periodically. I don't
        > understand the advice to fill the container to the top.
        >
      • jamesonbeam1
        Morning Alex, If your talking about aerating your final product with an air stone, in an open container, I again believe this is giving the angels far more
        Message 3 of 11 , Jun 3, 2008
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          Morning Alex,

          If your talking about aerating your final product with an air stone,
          in an open container, I again believe this is giving the angels far
          more then the share they deserve :)... Way too much ABV will be lost
          to them. As Trid and others have said, its much better to keep some
          air space in a closed container with your wood chips and open it
          occasionally then close and shake. This will imitate the way a
          barrel "breathes" during the aging process. The other trick to speed
          up the aging process is keeping the container in a place where it gets
          warm during the day and cold at night.

          This will also mimic the way a barrel expands in the heat and
          contracts in the cold, thereby forcing the product into and out of
          the wood, but at a lesser extent and extracting more of the wood
          flavors.

          As far as your second question, I do not fully understand what you
          mean by adding baking soda to your low wines and topping off. I hope
          your not talking about aging low wines... Some distillers add baking
          soda or salt to low wines to get a purer spirit and increase the
          boiling point of water. But dont age your low wines.

          Vino es Veritas,
          Jim.



          --- In new_distillers@yahoogroups.com, "castillo.alex2008"
          <castillo.alex2008@...> wrote:
          >
          >
          > 1.) I read Harry´s message and it says do not use the air stone for
          > avoiding some glue leaching to the batch; while I´ve seen others
          > using it, any comments?
          >
          > 2.) I use to top my lowwines (with baking soda) to the very top,
          will
          > it matter?
          >
          >
          >
          > --- In new_distillers@yahoogroups.com, "KM Services"
          > <km_services@> wrote:
          > >
          > > Correction, I do fill to the "top" , but not literally to the
          brim
          > ( should
          > > have phrased that better) I leave about 30mm to 50mm of air space
          > which
          > > allows for shaking up and aerating .my apologies
          > >
          > > This is my opinion and if I am wrong I will be corrected I am
          > sure...
          > >
          > > Cheers
          > >
          > > Ken Mc
          > >
          > >
          > >
          > > _____
          > >
          > > From: new_distillers@yahoogroups.com
          > [mailto:new_distillers@yahoogroups.com]
          > > On Behalf Of charlieltc
          > > Sent: Tuesday, 3 June 2008 9:23 a.m.
          > > To: new_distillers@yahoogroups.com
          > > Subject: [new_distillers] Aging
          > >
          > >
          > >
          > > Re new distillers msg KM 29476 and Alex 29472, Clarification from
          > the
          > > group please. KM suggested that the aging container should be
          > filled to
          > > the top and then opened, closed and shook periodically. I don't
          > > understand the advice to fill the container to the top.
          > >
          >
        • KM Services
          Alex, I agree with Jim and keep my grog whether bottled, oaking or steeping on a shelves in the garage away from direct light which is against a concrete
          Message 4 of 11 , Jun 3, 2008
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            Alex,

            I agree  with Jim and keep my grog whether bottled, oaking or steeping on a shelves in the garage away from direct light which is against a concrete block boundary wall where as he says gets the warmth of the day and cold of night and now as we are in winter overnight frosts

            This is my opinion and if I am wrong I will be corrected I am sure...

            Cheers

            Ken Mc

             


            From: new_distillers@yahoogroups.com [mailto: new_distillers@yahoogroups.com ] On Behalf Of jamesonbeam1
            Sent: Tuesday, 3 June 2008 7:48 p.m.
            To: new_distillers@yahoogroups.com
            Subject: [new_distillers] air pump for agin (before)Re: Aging

             

            Morning Alex,

            If your talking about aerating your final product with an air stone,
            in an open container, I again believe this is giving the angels far
            more then the share they deserve :)... Way too much ABV will be lost
            to them. As Trid and others have said, its much better to keep some
            air space in a closed container with your wood chips and open it
            occasionally then close and shake. This will imitate the way a
            barrel "breathes" during the aging process. The other trick to speed
            up the aging process is keeping the container in a place where it gets
            warm during the day and cold at night.

            This will also mimic the way a barrel expands in the heat and
            contracts in the cold, thereby forcing the product into and out of
            the wood, but at a lesser extent and extracting more of the wood
            flavors.

            As far as your second question, I do not fully understand what you
            mean by adding baking soda to your low wines and topping off. I hope
            your not talking about aging low wines... Some distillers add baking
            soda or salt to low wines to get a purer spirit and increase the
            boiling point of water. But dont age your low wines.

            Vino es Veritas,
            Jim.

          • castillo.alex2008
            Ok. got the message, do not aerate using a pump for not loosing alcohol. I´ll follow your (Jim and Ken) advices. In the other hand, I read you could use a
            Message 5 of 11 , Jun 3, 2008
            • 0 Attachment
              Ok. got the message, do not aerate using a pump for not loosing
              alcohol. I´ll follow your (Jim and Ken) advices. In the other hand, I
              read you could use a cork on top of your (let´s say 1 gallon) jug,
              resembling somehow a barrel in the issue of breathing, will it be ok?
              Now that we´re on the topic I have two other questions:

              a) How many times can you use an oak keg, are they forever, I mean,
              you put some alcohol, let it age, let´s say a year, take the aged
              spirit out and then what? feed the keg again with some new distill or
              that keg is now useless and must be destroyed?

              b) What do they do (industrially) in the case of white rum? since if
              they put it in an oak keg the spirit will get the color of the wood.

              Finally about the low wines I don´t age it, I add the baking soda for
              getting rid of the off flavors (due to unwanted esters), store them
              during a few days or a week and then distill, but top the bottle not
              letting air in order to prevent eventual contamination with
              acetobacter, but maybe this won´t be an issue, since my low wines are
              about 65% ABV and I doubt that any organism could live in those
              conditions.

              Alex

              --- In new_distillers@yahoogroups.com, "jamesonbeam1"
              <jamesonbeam1@...> wrote:
              >
              > Morning Alex,
              >
              > If your talking about aerating your final product with an air
              stone,
              > in an open container, I again believe this is giving the angels far
              > more then the share they deserve :)... Way too much ABV will be
              lost
              > to them. As Trid and others have said, its much better to keep some
              > air space in a closed container with your wood chips and open it
              > occasionally then close and shake. This will imitate the way a
              > barrel "breathes" during the aging process. The other trick to speed
              > up the aging process is keeping the container in a place where it
              gets
              > warm during the day and cold at night.
              >
              > This will also mimic the way a barrel expands in the heat and
              > contracts in the cold, thereby forcing the product into and out of
              > the wood, but at a lesser extent and extracting more of the wood
              > flavors.
              >
              > As far as your second question, I do not fully understand what you
              > mean by adding baking soda to your low wines and topping off. I
              hope
              > your not talking about aging low wines... Some distillers add
              baking
              > soda or salt to low wines to get a purer spirit and increase the
              > boiling point of water. But dont age your low wines.
              >
              > Vino es Veritas,
              > Jim.
              >
              >
              >
              > --- In new_distillers@yahoogroups.com, "castillo.alex2008"
              > <castillo.alex2008@> wrote:
              > >
              > >
              > > 1.) I read Harry´s message and it says do not use the air stone
              for
              > > avoiding some glue leaching to the batch; while I´ve seen others
              > > using it, any comments?
              > >
              > > 2.) I use to top my lowwines (with baking soda) to the very top,
              > will
              > > it matter?
              > >
              > >
              > >
              > > --- In new_distillers@yahoogroups.com, "KM Services"
              > > <km_services@> wrote:
              > > >
              > > > Correction, I do fill to the "top" , but not literally to the
              > brim
              > > ( should
              > > > have phrased that better) I leave about 30mm to 50mm of air
              space
              > > which
              > > > allows for shaking up and aerating .my apologies
              > > >
              > > > This is my opinion and if I am wrong I will be corrected I am
              > > sure...
              > > >
              > > > Cheers
              > > >
              > > > Ken Mc
              > > >
              > > >
              > > >
              > > > _____
              > > >
              > > > From: new_distillers@yahoogroups.com
              > > [mailto:new_distillers@yahoogroups.com]
              > > > On Behalf Of charlieltc
              > > > Sent: Tuesday, 3 June 2008 9:23 a.m.
              > > > To: new_distillers@yahoogroups.com
              > > > Subject: [new_distillers] Aging
              > > >
              > > >
              > > >
              > > > Re new distillers msg KM 29476 and Alex 29472, Clarification
              from
              > > the
              > > > group please. KM suggested that the aging container should be
              > > filled to
              > > > the top and then opened, closed and shook periodically. I don't
              > > > understand the advice to fill the container to the top.
              > > >
              > >
              >
            • mstehelin
              Alex, I know that barrels go through a long cycle before they are finally sold to people for flower planters. From Bourbon,to sherry to scotch to the flower
              Message 6 of 11 , Jun 3, 2008
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                Alex,
                I know that barrels go through a long cycle before they are finally
                sold to people for flower planters. From Bourbon,to sherry to scotch
                to the flower pot. I think this process may take years, if not a
                decade. As to your questions of baking soda, I think you only add a
                couple of table spoons per 4 litres. I don't think you have to worry
                about turning your low wines into vinegar, like you say, nothing can
                live in that high ABV environment.
                Cheers
                M

                --- In new_distillers@yahoogroups.com, "castillo.alex2008"
                <castillo.alex2008@...> wrote:
                >
                >
                > Ok. got the message, do not aerate using a pump for not loosing
                > alcohol. I´ll follow your (Jim and Ken) advices. In the other hand, I
                > read you could use a cork on top of your (let´s say 1 gallon) jug,
                > resembling somehow a barrel in the issue of breathing, will it be ok?
                > Now that we´re on the topic I have two other questions:
                >
                > a) How many times can you use an oak keg, are they forever, I mean,
                > you put some alcohol, let it age, let´s say a year, take the aged
                > spirit out and then what? feed the keg again with some new distill or
                > that keg is now useless and must be destroyed?
                >
                > b) What do they do (industrially) in the case of white rum? since if
                > they put it in an oak keg the spirit will get the color of the wood.
                >
                > Finally about the low wines I don´t age it, I add the baking soda for
                > getting rid of the off flavors (due to unwanted esters), store them
                > during a few days or a week and then distill, but top the bottle not
                > letting air in order to prevent eventual contamination with
                > acetobacter, but maybe this won´t be an issue, since my low wines are
                > about 65% ABV and I doubt that any organism could live in those
                > conditions.
                >
                > Alex
                >
                > --- In new_distillers@yahoogroups.com, "jamesonbeam1"
                > <jamesonbeam1@> wrote:
                > >
                > > Morning Alex,
                > >
                > > If your talking about aerating your final product with an air
                > stone,
                > > in an open container, I again believe this is giving the angels far
                > > more then the share they deserve :)... Way too much ABV will be
                > lost
                > > to them. As Trid and others have said, its much better to keep some
                > > air space in a closed container with your wood chips and open it
                > > occasionally then close and shake. This will imitate the way a
                > > barrel "breathes" during the aging process. The other trick to speed
                > > up the aging process is keeping the container in a place where it
                > gets
                > > warm during the day and cold at night.
                > >
                > > This will also mimic the way a barrel expands in the heat and
                > > contracts in the cold, thereby forcing the product into and out of
                > > the wood, but at a lesser extent and extracting more of the wood
                > > flavors.
                > >
                > > As far as your second question, I do not fully understand what you
                > > mean by adding baking soda to your low wines and topping off. I
                > hope
                > > your not talking about aging low wines... Some distillers add
                > baking
                > > soda or salt to low wines to get a purer spirit and increase the
                > > boiling point of water. But dont age your low wines.
                > >
                > > Vino es Veritas,
                > > Jim.
                > >
                > >
                > >
                > > --- In new_distillers@yahoogroups.com, "castillo.alex2008"
                > > <castillo.alex2008@> wrote:
                > > >
                > > >
                > > > 1.) I read Harry´s message and it says do not use the air stone
                > for
                > > > avoiding some glue leaching to the batch; while I´ve seen others
                > > > using it, any comments?
                > > >
                > > > 2.) I use to top my lowwines (with baking soda) to the very top,
                > > will
                > > > it matter?
                > > >
                > > >
                > > >
                > > > --- In new_distillers@yahoogroups.com, "KM Services"
                > > > <km_services@> wrote:
                > > > >
                > > > > Correction, I do fill to the "top" , but not literally to the
                > > brim
                > > > ( should
                > > > > have phrased that better) I leave about 30mm to 50mm of air
                > space
                > > > which
                > > > > allows for shaking up and aerating .my apologies
                > > > >
                > > > > This is my opinion and if I am wrong I will be corrected I am
                > > > sure...
                > > > >
                > > > > Cheers
                > > > >
                > > > > Ken Mc
                > > > >
                > > > >
                > > > >
                > > > > _____
                > > > >
                > > > > From: new_distillers@yahoogroups.com
                > > > [mailto:new_distillers@yahoogroups.com]
                > > > > On Behalf Of charlieltc
                > > > > Sent: Tuesday, 3 June 2008 9:23 a.m.
                > > > > To: new_distillers@yahoogroups.com
                > > > > Subject: [new_distillers] Aging
                > > > >
                > > > >
                > > > >
                > > > > Re new distillers msg KM 29476 and Alex 29472, Clarification
                > from
                > > > the
                > > > > group please. KM suggested that the aging container should be
                > > > filled to
                > > > > the top and then opened, closed and shook periodically. I don't
                > > > > understand the advice to fill the container to the top.
                > > > >
                > > >
                > >
                >
              • castillo.alex2008
                Yep! That´s what I do, 1 tbsp. per liter of low wines, and that´s what I thought about that high ABV, so I will discard the possibility of low wines becoming
                Message 7 of 11 , Jun 3, 2008
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                  Yep! That´s what I do, 1 tbsp. per liter of low wines, and that´s
                  what I thought about that high ABV, so I will discard the possibility
                  of low wines becoming vinegar, but I was thinking why bothering going
                  to a spirits run, why just don´t make your cuts right in the
                  stripping run? my low wines are about 65% ABV every time which is not
                  that low for hooch since it´ll be further diluted to let´s say 40%.
                  How´s that?

                  Alex

                  --- In new_distillers@yahoogroups.com, "mstehelin" <mstehelin@...>
                  wrote:
                  >
                  > Alex,
                  > I know that barrels go through a long cycle before they are finally
                  > sold to people for flower planters. From Bourbon,to sherry to scotch
                  > to the flower pot. I think this process may take years, if not a
                  > decade. As to your questions of baking soda, I think you only add a
                  > couple of table spoons per 4 litres. I don't think you have to worry
                  > about turning your low wines into vinegar, like you say, nothing can
                  > live in that high ABV environment.
                  > Cheers
                  > M
                  >
                  > --- In new_distillers@yahoogroups.com, "castillo.alex2008"
                  > <castillo.alex2008@> wrote:
                  > >
                  > >
                  > > Ok. got the message, do not aerate using a pump for not loosing
                  > > alcohol. I´ll follow your (Jim and Ken) advices. In the other
                  hand, I
                  > > read you could use a cork on top of your (let´s say 1 gallon)
                  jug,
                  > > resembling somehow a barrel in the issue of breathing, will it be
                  ok?
                  > > Now that we´re on the topic I have two other questions:
                  > >
                  > > a) How many times can you use an oak keg, are they forever, I
                  mean,
                  > > you put some alcohol, let it age, let´s say a year, take the aged
                  > > spirit out and then what? feed the keg again with some new
                  distill or
                  > > that keg is now useless and must be destroyed?
                  > >
                  > > b) What do they do (industrially) in the case of white rum? since
                  if
                  > > they put it in an oak keg the spirit will get the color of the
                  wood.
                  > >
                  > > Finally about the low wines I don´t age it, I add the baking soda
                  for
                  > > getting rid of the off flavors (due to unwanted esters), store
                  them
                  > > during a few days or a week and then distill, but top the bottle
                  not
                  > > letting air in order to prevent eventual contamination with
                  > > acetobacter, but maybe this won´t be an issue, since my low wines
                  are
                  > > about 65% ABV and I doubt that any organism could live in those
                  > > conditions.
                  > >
                  > > Alex
                  > >
                  > > --- In new_distillers@yahoogroups.com, "jamesonbeam1"
                  > > <jamesonbeam1@> wrote:
                  > > >
                  > > > Morning Alex,
                  > > >
                  > > > If your talking about aerating your final product with an air
                  > > stone,
                  > > > in an open container, I again believe this is giving the angels
                  far
                  > > > more then the share they deserve :)... Way too much ABV will be
                  > > lost
                  > > > to them. As Trid and others have said, its much better to keep
                  some
                  > > > air space in a closed container with your wood chips and open it
                  > > > occasionally then close and shake. This will imitate the way a
                  > > > barrel "breathes" during the aging process. The other trick to
                  speed
                  > > > up the aging process is keeping the container in a place where
                  it
                  > > gets
                  > > > warm during the day and cold at night.
                  > > >
                  > > > This will also mimic the way a barrel expands in the heat and
                  > > > contracts in the cold, thereby forcing the product into and out
                  of
                  > > > the wood, but at a lesser extent and extracting more of the
                  wood
                  > > > flavors.
                  > > >
                  > > > As far as your second question, I do not fully understand what
                  you
                  > > > mean by adding baking soda to your low wines and topping off. I
                  > > hope
                  > > > your not talking about aging low wines... Some distillers add
                  > > baking
                  > > > soda or salt to low wines to get a purer spirit and increase
                  the
                  > > > boiling point of water. But dont age your low wines.
                  > > >
                  > > > Vino es Veritas,
                  > > > Jim.
                  > > >
                  > > >
                  > > >
                  > > > --- In new_distillers@yahoogroups.com, "castillo.alex2008"
                  > > > <castillo.alex2008@> wrote:
                  > > > >
                  > > > >
                  > > > > 1.) I read Harry´s message and it says do not use the air
                  stone
                  > > for
                  > > > > avoiding some glue leaching to the batch; while I´ve seen
                  others
                  > > > > using it, any comments?
                  > > > >
                  > > > > 2.) I use to top my lowwines (with baking soda) to the very
                  top,
                  > > > will
                  > > > > it matter?
                  > > > >
                  > > > >
                  > > > >
                  > > > > --- In new_distillers@yahoogroups.com, "KM Services"
                  > > > > <km_services@> wrote:
                  > > > > >
                  > > > > > Correction, I do fill to the "top" , but not literally to
                  the
                  > > > brim
                  > > > > ( should
                  > > > > > have phrased that better) I leave about 30mm to 50mm of air
                  > > space
                  > > > > which
                  > > > > > allows for shaking up and aerating .my apologies
                  > > > > >
                  > > > > > This is my opinion and if I am wrong I will be corrected I
                  am
                  > > > > sure...
                  > > > > >
                  > > > > > Cheers
                  > > > > >
                  > > > > > Ken Mc
                  > > > > >
                  > > > > >
                  > > > > >
                  > > > > > _____
                  > > > > >
                  > > > > > From: new_distillers@yahoogroups.com
                  > > > > [mailto:new_distillers@yahoogroups.com]
                  > > > > > On Behalf Of charlieltc
                  > > > > > Sent: Tuesday, 3 June 2008 9:23 a.m.
                  > > > > > To: new_distillers@yahoogroups.com
                  > > > > > Subject: [new_distillers] Aging
                  > > > > >
                  > > > > >
                  > > > > >
                  > > > > > Re new distillers msg KM 29476 and Alex 29472,
                  Clarification
                  > > from
                  > > > > the
                  > > > > > group please. KM suggested that the aging container should
                  be
                  > > > > filled to
                  > > > > > the top and then opened, closed and shook periodically. I
                  don't
                  > > > > > understand the advice to fill the container to the top.
                  > > > > >
                  > > > >
                  > > >
                  > >
                  >
                • jamesonbeam1
                  Hey Alex, American white oak barrels may be used many times for different uses. U.S. Bourbons and Tennessee Whiskeys by law are required to be aged in new oak
                  Message 8 of 11 , Jun 3, 2008
                  • 0 Attachment

                    Hey Alex,

                    American white oak barrels may be used many times for different uses. U.S.  Bourbons and Tennessee Whiskeys by law are required to be aged in new oak barrels (can only be used one time) for a minimum of 2 years (most all distillers age for 4 years or longer).  From there, the barrels are sold to distillers across the world, making Scotch, Irish Whiskey, Rum, Brandies, Wines, etc.   Its up to the individual distillers how many times they are re-used after that.

                    For us hobby distillers, depending on the quality and char of the barrel, you can use it until personal tastes and preferences say its "depleted".  However, it can be re-newed by adding  new charred oak chips to it, if flavors start to dimish.  If it ever starts leaking though, that might be a serious problem.

                    Regarding white, light rums, they are sometime aged ,sometimes not in used oak barrels, but not for a long time and sometimes  filtered to remove coloration.  See Below:

                    Grades

                    Example of dark, spiced, and light rums.
                    Example of dark, spiced, and light rums.

                    The grades and variations used to describe rum depend on the location that a rum was produced. Despite these variations the following terms are frequently used to describe various types of rum:

                    • Light Rums, also referred to as light, silver, and white rums. In general, light rum has very little flavor aside from a general sweetness, and serves accordingly as a base for cocktails. Light rums are sometimes filtered after aging to remove any color. The Brazilian immensely popular Cachaça belongs to this type.
                    • Gold Rums, also called amber rums, are medium-bodied rums which are generally aged. These gain their dark color from aging in wooden barrels (usually the charred white oak barrels that are the byproduct of Bourbon Whiskey).
                    • Spiced Rum: These rums obtain their flavor through addition of spices and, sometimes, caramel. Most are darker in color, and based on gold rums. Some are significantly darker, while many cheaper brands are made from inexpensive white rums and darkened with artificial caramel color.
                    • Dark Rum, also known as black rum, classes as a grade darker than gold rum. It is generally aged longer, in heavily charred barrels. Dark rum has a much stronger flavor than either light or gold rum, and hints of spices can be detected, along with a strong molasses or caramel overtone. It is used to provide substance in rum drinks, as well as color. In addition to uses in mixed drinks, dark rum is the type of rum most commonly used in cooking.
                    • Flavored Rum: Some manufacturers have begun to sell rums which they have infused with flavors of fruits such as mango, orange, citrus, coconut, and lime which is a lime rum found in Sweden. These serve to flavor similarly themed tropical drinks which generally comprise less than 40% alcohol, and are also often drunk neat or on the rocks.
                    • Overproof Rum is rum which is much higher than the standard 40% alcohol. Most of these rums bear greater than 75%, in fact, and preparations of 151 to 160 proof occur commonly.
                    • Premium Rum: As with other sipping spirits, such as Cognac and Scotch, a market exists for premium and super-premium rums. These are generally boutique brands which sell very aged and carefully produced rums. They have more character and flavor than their "mixing" counterparts, and are generally consumed without the addition of other ingredients.

                                 Vino es Veritas,

                                 Jim.

                     


                    --- In new_distillers@yahoogroups.com, "castillo.alex2008" <castillo.alex2008@...> wrote:
                    >
                    >
                    > Ok. got the message, do not aerate using a pump for not loosing
                    > alcohol. I´ll follow your (Jim and Ken) advices. In the other hand, I
                    > read you could use a cork on top of your (let´s say 1 gallon) jug,
                    > resembling somehow a barrel in the issue of breathing, will it be ok?
                    > Now that we´re on the topic I have two other questions:
                    >
                    > a) How many times can you use an oak keg, are they forever, I mean,
                    > you put some alcohol, let it age, let´s say a year, take the aged
                    > spirit out and then what? feed the keg again with some new distill or
                    > that keg is now useless and must be destroyed?
                    >
                    > b) What do they do (industrially) in the case of white rum? since if
                    > they put it in an oak keg the spirit will get the color of the wood.
                    >
                    > Finally about the low wines I don´t age it, I add the baking soda for
                    > getting rid of the off flavors (due to unwanted esters), store them
                    > during a few days or a week and then distill, but top the bottle not
                    > letting air in order to prevent eventual contamination with
                    > acetobacter, but maybe this won´t be an issue, since my low wines are
                    > about 65% ABV and I doubt that any organism could live in those
                    > conditions.
                    >
                    > Alex

                  • rye_junkie1
                    ... Alex, First run hooch is full of impurities and fussels. I have tried many ways of doing only a single run and honestly nothing beats the double distill.
                    Message 9 of 11 , Jun 3, 2008
                    • 0 Attachment
                      --- In new_distillers@yahoogroups.com, "castillo.alex2008"
                      <castillo.alex2008@...> wrote:
                      >
                      >
                      > Yep! That´s what I do, 1 tbsp. per liter of low wines, and that´s
                      > what I thought about that high ABV, so I will discard the possibility
                      > of low wines becoming vinegar, but I was thinking why bothering going
                      > to a spirits run, why just don´t make your cuts right in the
                      > stripping run? my low wines are about 65% ABV every time which is not
                      > that low for hooch since it´ll be further diluted to let´s say 40%.
                      > How´s that?
                      >
                      > Alex
                      >

                      Alex,
                      First run hooch is full of impurities and fussels. I have tried many
                      ways of doing only a single run and honestly nothing beats the double
                      distill. Except the triple distill. Some guys run once in a reflux
                      column and say they get good drink but i have also tried this a found
                      it is a loosing proposition. For me anyway. Remember, ABV doesnt
                      guarantee purity.

                      Mason
                      Live by the strip run
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