Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

Re: how long can a wash sit

Expand Messages
  • castillo.alex2008
    ... Jim, is there a probability of ending up with vinegar due to the oxidation of the alcohol present due to the bacteria (acetobacter)? I´m not a wine maker
    Message 1 of 10 , May 1, 2008
    • 0 Attachment
      --- In new_distillers@yahoogroups.com, "jamesonbeam1"
      <jamesonbeam1@...> wrote:
      >
      > Right on the Money there Pussycat:):):). Just make sure you use air
      > locks...
      >
      > Vino es Veritas,
      > Jim.
      >
      >
      Jim, is there a probability of ending up with vinegar due to the
      oxidation of the alcohol present due to the bacteria (acetobacter)? I´m
      not a wine maker but I remember that once I made some wine and after a
      few month it turned into vinegar (which was used to cook at home). So
      under what conditions alcohol won´t turned into vinegar?

      Alex
    • jamesonbeam1
      Yes Alex, There alway is a possibility of you wash / mash getting infected by acetobacter bacteria, and other nasties. These are the main reasons for keeping
      Message 2 of 10 , May 1, 2008
      • 0 Attachment
        Yes Alex,

        There alway is a possibility of you wash / mash getting infected by
        acetobacter bacteria, and other nasties. These are the main reasons
        for keeping your utensils and fermenters clean, covering your
        fermentation during the primary fermentation, then racking and putting
        it into a secondary (clean) fermenter with an air lock to keep out the
        nasties (if its going to remain for a long time......

        However, since we distillers usually only keep the wash / mash in a
        fermenter for a week or two, while there is still carbon dioxide being
        generated, and not exposing it to air, the danger is nowhere near as
        great as with wine making where it may sit for a year or so before
        being bottled. Another trick wine makers do, is add sulfites and
        clarifiers, after the primary fermentation, to kill the yeasts and any
        nasties that might have infected it during racking :):).

        Vino es Veritas,
        Jim.

        --- In new_distillers@yahoogroups.com, "castillo.alex2008"
        <castillo.alex2008@...> wrote:

        > Jim, is there a probability of ending up with vinegar due to the
        > oxidation of the alcohol present due to the bacteria (acetobacter)?
        I´m
        > not a wine maker but I remember that once I made some wine and after
        a
        > few month it turned into vinegar (which was used to cook at home).
        So
        > under what conditions alcohol won´t turned into vinegar?
        >
        > Alex
        >
      Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.