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Re: All malted barley mash

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  • jamesonbeam1
    Hey AG, Usually, all grain whiskey makers shoot for a low ABV mash (around 7% to 8% ABV on purpose. The reason for this is that, you want the flavors to come
    Message 1 of 4 , Apr 29 1:07 PM
      Hey AG,

      Usually, all grain whiskey makers shoot for a low ABV mash (around 7%
      to 8% ABV on purpose. The reason for this is that, you want the
      flavors to come through over the alcohol. The stronger your mash is in
      ABV, the lower the flavors will be in the first distillation. This is
      also why pot stills are favored over reflux for whiskey making, even
      though a reflux can be modified and de-refluxed to mimic a pot still
      and be just as good.

      The other reason, is that without adding sugars to an all grain mash,
      due to the conversion factors and amount of starch in grains that can
      be converted to sugars, it is hard to reach anything over 11% - 12%.
      This would take so much grains, you would end up with soup or some
      nice cream of barley, corn etc. Please read about convertion factors
      and Mash Efficiency and Yield at: http://homedistiller.org/yield.htm

      However, Im not saying that you can't add sugar to your malted barley
      to increase the ABV yield. I do this all the time to my corn whiskey
      mash, and is the basis for Uncle Jesse's (the real one :):) famous Sour
      Mash Method.

      Just keep in mind, the higher the alcohol yield your trying to achieve
      in your mash, the less there will be in flavors comming through. I
      have done up to a 12% corn mash using sugar instead of malt, and it was
      fine. But going over that - like 14% to 16%, I experienced a
      significant loss of flavors.

      Vino es Veritas,
      Jim.

      --- In new_distillers@yahoogroups.com, "aghoover" <aghoover@...> wrote:
      >
      > I've done 2 practice sugar mash runs and have made a powerful, yet
      > foul product with our pot still. We just picked up an alcoholometer
      > so I don't exact percentage, but they seemed stronger than 60%.
      > However the yield from a full carboy of fermented wash seemed rather
      > low. I realize that I'm not a master fermenter yet, but I was a
      > little disappointed with that. The next wash will be all malted
      > barley and it seems like the recipes I've found have a mash at ~6%.
      > Is it unreasonable to make a barley mash closer to 15-20%?
      >
    • aghoover
      Perfect. Thanks alot.
      Message 2 of 4 , Apr 29 2:43 PM
        Perfect. Thanks alot.

        --- In new_distillers@yahoogroups.com, "jamesonbeam1"
        <jamesonbeam1@...> wrote:
        >
        > Hey AG,
        >
        > Usually, all grain whiskey makers shoot for a low ABV mash (around 7%
        > to 8% ABV on purpose. The reason for this is that, you want the
        > flavors to come through over the alcohol. The stronger your mash is in
        > ABV, the lower the flavors will be in the first distillation. This is
        > also why pot stills are favored over reflux for whiskey making, even
        > though a reflux can be modified and de-refluxed to mimic a pot still
        > and be just as good.
        >
        > The other reason, is that without adding sugars to an all grain mash,
        > due to the conversion factors and amount of starch in grains that can
        > be converted to sugars, it is hard to reach anything over 11% - 12%.
        > This would take so much grains, you would end up with soup or some
        > nice cream of barley, corn etc. Please read about convertion factors
        > and Mash Efficiency and Yield at: http://homedistiller.org/yield.htm
        >
        > However, Im not saying that you can't add sugar to your malted barley
        > to increase the ABV yield. I do this all the time to my corn whiskey
        > mash, and is the basis for Uncle Jesse's (the real one :):) famous Sour
        > Mash Method.
        >
        > Just keep in mind, the higher the alcohol yield your trying to achieve
        > in your mash, the less there will be in flavors comming through. I
        > have done up to a 12% corn mash using sugar instead of malt, and it was
        > fine. But going over that - like 14% to 16%, I experienced a
        > significant loss of flavors.
        >
        > Vino es Veritas,
        > Jim.
        >
        > --- In new_distillers@yahoogroups.com, "aghoover" <aghoover@> wrote:
        > >
        > > I've done 2 practice sugar mash runs and have made a powerful, yet
        > > foul product with our pot still. We just picked up an alcoholometer
        > > so I don't exact percentage, but they seemed stronger than 60%.
        > > However the yield from a full carboy of fermented wash seemed rather
        > > low. I realize that I'm not a master fermenter yet, but I was a
        > > little disappointed with that. The next wash will be all malted
        > > barley and it seems like the recipes I've found have a mash at ~6%.
        > > Is it unreasonable to make a barley mash closer to 15-20%?
        > >
        >
      • jamesonbeam1
        AHHH AG, Wish it were so :):):). Remember: To Err is Human, To make a Fine Whiskey - Divine... Vino es Veritas, Jim. ... Perfect. Thanks alot. ...
        Message 3 of 4 , Apr 29 2:48 PM
          AHHH AG,

          Wish it were so :):):). Remember:

          "To Err is Human, To make a Fine Whiskey - Divine..."

          Vino es Veritas,
          Jim.


          --- In new_distillers@yahoogroups.com, "aghoover" <aghoover@...> wrote:

          Perfect. Thanks alot.

          --- In new_distillers@yahoogroups.com, "jamesonbeam1"
          <jamesonbeam1@...> wrote:
          >
          > Hey AG,
          >
          > Usually, all grain whiskey makers shoot for a low ABV mash (around 7%
          > to 8% ABV on purpose. The reason for this is that, you want the
          > flavors to come through over the alcohol. The stronger your mash is in
          > ABV, the lower the flavors will be in the first distillation. This is
          > also why pot stills are favored over reflux for whiskey making, even
          > though a reflux can be modified and de-refluxed to mimic a pot still
          > and be just as good.
          ____snip____
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