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what proof will alcohol ignite with a cigarette lighter

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  • philip_smithwick
    just did my first run ever earlier but i dont have hydrometer to check the percentage of alcohol ,so i went old school and put some on a plate and hit it with
    Message 1 of 6 , Apr 19, 2008
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      just did my first run ever earlier but i dont have hydrometer to
      check the percentage of alcohol ,so i went old school and put some on a
      plate and hit it with a lighter. it immeditaly blazed a blue flame.
      also could anyone explain that old timer trick of shaking the moonshine
      in a glass jar and watching the bubbles to get an idea of the proof.
      its something i saw on that show modern marvels a while back ,but i
      cant remember what to look for. well, i have product to go taste,talk
      at yall later

      phil
    • Jesse
      ... a ... moonshine ... Hey phil I have noticed when I have High proof like 180 or higher, the bubbles will go away really fast almost like there is nothing to
      Message 2 of 6 , Apr 19, 2008
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        --- In new_distillers@yahoogroups.com, "philip_smithwick"
        <philip_smithwick@...> wrote:
        >
        > just did my first run ever earlier but i dont have hydrometer to
        > check the percentage of alcohol ,so i went old school and put some on
        a
        > plate and hit it with a lighter. it immeditaly blazed a blue flame.
        > also could anyone explain that old timer trick of shaking the
        moonshine
        > in a glass jar and watching the bubbles to get an idea of the proof.
        > its something i saw on that show modern marvels a while back ,but i
        > cant remember what to look for. well, i have product to go taste,talk
        > at yall later
        >
        > phil
        >
        Hey phil I have noticed when I have High proof like 180 or higher, the
        bubbles will go away really fast almost like there is nothing to catch
        the bubbles, but then I sometimes Have seen Very almost mirco bubbles
        in there after wards like around the edges, but I think this is when I
        have maybe heads or tails in there, But I do know that the big bubbles
        you get after shaking hard will go away very quick when its good
        stuff, I am a noob so I don't want you to depend on my advice
        alone, I am sure That someone else will know more, or even say I am
        wrong,LOL thanks though and good Luck,,,
        Hey gots any gun powder, If so put a little pile out side(besafe
        about it) just a little, and then cover barley with your product, then
        light, If the powder will then light to, it is usaually around the 150-
        180 mark I belive, ITs on the Homedistiller.Org site,
        SOmewhere Good luck and be safe Uncle Jess
      • jamesonbeam1
        Hi Phil, Interesting questions. Being somewhat of a history bluff, let me give you my understandings (Im sure some will come up with other reasons)... The
        Message 3 of 6 , Apr 20, 2008
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          Hi Phil,

          Interesting questions. Being somewhat of a history bluff, let me give
          you my understandings (Im sure some will come up with other reasons)...

          The term "Proof", originated in the 18th century when the British
          sailors were allocated their daily issue of grog - Gin (American
          sailors were issued Rum of course, before and during the Revolutionary
          war:).

          This practice is continued today, but now only with the officers (dang
          Bureaucracy lol) the original gin issued was from Black Friars
          Distillery in Plymouth, England and is the oldest operating Gin
          distillery in England (its still the brand issued to the officers on
          HMS ships). See:
          http://onthehouse.typepad.com/on_the_house/2007/08/the-gin-that-la.html

          The flame test originated in order to make sure the gin was at least
          57% pure or "Proof". Today that has been changed to 50% abv as "Proof".
          This was done by placing the gin on black gunpower and igniting it.

          If it burned with a reddish flame or sizzled out, it wasnt "proof". If
          it burned with a bright blue flame, then it was "proof". This was done
          for 2 reasons:

          The first being, that the Gin was always stored in the magazine of a
          ship - where the gunpower was stored - this being the dryest area of
          any sailing vessel. If the Gin was "proof" and it happened to leak or
          was hit by a cannon ball, then they were assured that the gunpower
          would continue to ignite..

          The second reason was, the sailors also did this test to make sure
          their daily ration of Grog wasnt watered down by some un-scrupulous
          Captains (probably cuz the wanted more for themselves :):).

          The "Bubble" test was done by the ol' timer moonshiners. The more
          water in an alcohol solution, the large and greater numbers the bubbles
          would be after shaking. Experienced moonshiners could tell by the
          amount and size of the bubbles, and how many layers there were of them
          after shaking the bottle, the abv of the liquor - almost to a percent
          or 2.

          I have tried both methods for fun. Proper way to do the flame test
          (unless you want to buy some black gunpower:) is to put it in a
          tablespoon and ignite it.

          If it burns reddish, or sizzles - its under proof. If it burns with a
          blue flame, its at least 100 proof. If it burns with a bright blue
          flame with a reddish / orange head on top - its "Over-proof".

          If it blows up in your face, ya know you have some serious Chit....

          I have also tried the bubble test but even after alot of practice, and
          testing afterwards with an alcoholometer, could only get with in +/-
          about 10% abv.

          I would strongly suggest that instead of practicing these ancient
          tests, to get yourself a 6-7 dollar US proof hydrometer (alocholmeter)
          and save some troubles. Plus, the burn test can be a bit dangerous,
          since one time i dropped some burning alcohol on some papers on my
          table and almost started a fire lol.

          Vino es Veritas,
          Jim.











          --- In new_distillers@yahoogroups.com, "philip_smithwick"
          <philip_smithwick@...> wrote:
          >
          > just did my first run ever earlier but i dont have hydrometer to
          > check the percentage of alcohol ,so i went old school and put some on
          a
          > plate and hit it with a lighter. it immeditaly blazed a blue flame.
          > also could anyone explain that old timer trick of shaking the
          moonshine
          > in a glass jar and watching the bubbles to get an idea of the proof.
          > its something i saw on that show modern marvels a while back ,but i
          > cant remember what to look for. well, i have product to go taste,talk
          > at yall later
          >
          > phil
          >
        • Harry
          ... Revolutionary ... (dang ... on ... Jim, There s an awful lot of Rum drinkers out there who would argue the point here. So here s a few snippets to add to
          Message 4 of 6 , Apr 20, 2008
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            --- In new_distillers@yahoogroups.com, "jamesonbeam1"
            <jamesonbeam1@...> wrote:

            >
            > The term "Proof", originated in the 18th century when the British
            > sailors were allocated their daily issue of grog - Gin (American
            > sailors were issued Rum of course, before and during the
            Revolutionary
            > war:).
            >
            > This practice is continued today, but now only with the officers
            (dang
            > Bureaucracy lol) the original gin issued was from Black Friars
            > Distillery in Plymouth, England and is the oldest operating Gin
            > distillery in England (its still the brand issued to the officers
            on
            > HMS ships).


            Jim,

            There's an awful lot of Rum drinkers out there who would argue the
            point here. So here's a few snippets to add to the story. :)

            As I understand it, rather than being officially 'issued', Gin was
            aparently the 'drink of preference' for the Royal Navy officers. One
            source says it's more British Army. The history of Plymouth Gin is
            some 200 years while Rum in the Royal Navy has been official for 300
            years. And Gin is not 'Grog'. That honour belongs to Navy Rum,
            specifically Pusser's Rum, so named after the ship's Purser whose job
            it was to issue it.

            Navy Rum got the name 'Grog' thus...
            Grog: The name is derived from "Old Grogram," the nickname of British
            Rear Admiral Edward Vernon (and the cloak he wore) who ordered his
            sailors' rum ration diluted to prevent hoarding and drunkenness. Grog
            is water and rum cut together, and a proper grog had lime juice to
            help stave off scurvy and a measure of cane sugar to aid in taste.
            The concoction was served from a barrel on the deck, often called a
            scuttlebutt.
            See the Pusser's Rum link at the end of this post.

            <ext>
            Gin, being a cheap alcoholic beverage, was originally bought by the
            poor and caused considerable social problems, illustrated and
            satirised by the engraving 'Gin Lane' by Hogarth in 1751. Ironically
            for Plymouth, just as the spirit given in quantity to mellow common
            seamen was Navy Rum, so the officers preferred Gin, which spread
            through the officers' messes and golf clubs of Empire. The
            cocktail 'Pink Gin' was claimed to have been invented as a means to
            get sailors to drink Angostura bitters in an attempt to curb the
            malnourishment that was rife on long voyages in those days. The world
            responsibilities and deployment of the British Royal Navy led to the
            renown, and wide consumption of the product.

            Although sold in the distillery shop and sometimes the bigger
            hypermarkets, the brand is not obvious in its home town
            </ext>
            [Source: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Plymouth_Gin_Distillery%5d


            <ext>
            Whereas the Royal Navy had rum, Her Majesty's Army had gin. Legend
            has it that the Army in India had a problem with malaria and the cure
            for the disease, quinine, tasted really bad. To get the soldiers to
            take their medicine, it was mixed with the liquor ration. Thus gin &
            tonic was born.
            </ext>
            [Source: http://store.piratesversusninjas.net/piratedrinks.html%5d


            This from the makers of Pusser's Rum...
            <ext>
            Producer Information
            Prior to 1740, the men's daily tot of Pusser's Rum was a pint a day,
            which they drank neat, that is without water! Before battle, they
            were issued a double 'tot', and always after victory for a job well
            done! From 1655 to the 19th century, Pusser's Rum was one of the few
            daily comforts afforded those early seamen of Britain's Navy as they
            fought around the globe to keep the Empire intact and its sea lanes
            open. It was not until July 31st, 1970 that the Admiralty Board
            abolished the daily issue of Pusser's Rum. "Times had changed", they
            said as they concluded that "in a highly sophisticated navy no risk
            for margin or error which might be attributable to rum could be
            allowed". And so it was that the daily issue of Pusser's Rum, which
            had stood the test of time as the Navy's longest serving tradition
            for over 300 years, was cast aside like a piece of flotsam and jetsam
            where it lay quietly until 1979.
            In 1979, Charles Tobias - entrepreneur, global sailor, raconteur -
            sought to resurrect the Pusser's Rum tradition. He obtained the
            rights and all the blending information from the Admiralty, and
            formed Pusser's Ltd. on Tortola in the British Virgin Islands and
            began bottling and selling this storied spirit in 1980 to the public
            for the first time. (Prior to then, it was restricted to the Royal
            Navy). British Navy Pusser's Rum is the same Admiralty blend of five
            West Indian rums as issued on board British warships, and it is with
            the Admiralty's blessing and approval that Pusser's is now available
            to the consumer.
            The Royal Navy Sailor's Fund, a naval charity more commonly called
            the "Tot Fund" receives a substantial donation from the sale of each
            bottle of British Navy Pusser's Rum. Aside from the fund's original
            bequest, the Pusser's contribution has become the fund's largest
            source of income.
            Today's Pusser's Rum is still produced in exact accordance with the
            Admiralty's specifications for rum. Unlike most rums, Pusser's uses
            no flavoring agents. It is 100% natural. In 2001, Pusser's was
            awarded the "Gold Medal - World's Premier Dark Rum" at the
            International Wine & Spirits Festival. In 2003, Pusser's Rum won
            a "Double Gold Medal" at the San Francisco World Spirits Competition.
            </ext>
            Full story and history of Pusser's here...
            http://www.pussers.com/rum/history

            Ain't booze history a fascinating subject to research? There's no
            end to the pleasures derived from this hobby.

            Slainte!
            regards Harry
          • jamesonbeam1
            Yes sorry Harry, Ment to say Gin was givin to the Officers and Rum was given to the sailors... And Yes - Grog is correct expression for rum not gin - sorry.
            Message 5 of 6 , Apr 20, 2008
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              Yes sorry Harry,

              Ment to say Gin was givin to the Officers and Rum was given to the sailors...  And Yes - Grog is correct expression for rum not gin - sorry.

              But as with all history discussions - there's 2 sides to the story:

              Humans discovered long ago that they could not drink sea water, and required significant quantities of fresh water on extended voyages. Since they were unable to desalinate sea water, fresh water was taken on board in casks but quickly developed algae and became slimy. Stagnant water was sweetened with beer or wine to make it palatable which involved more casks and was subject to spoilage. As longer voyages became more common, the task of stowage became more and more difficult and the sailors' then-daily ration of a gallon of beer began to add up.

              Following Britain's conquest of Jamaica in 1655, a half pint or "2 gills" of rum gradually replaced beer and brandy as the drink of choice. Given to the sailor straight, this caused additional problems, as some sailors would save up the rum rations for several days, then drink them all at once. Due to the subsequent illness and disciplinary problems, the rum was mixed with water. This both diluted its effects, and delayed its spoilage. A half pint, one cup, of rum mixed with one quart of water and issued in two servings before noon and after the end of the working day became part of the official regulations of the Royal Navy in 1756 and lasted for more than two centuries. This gives a ratio of 4:1.

              Citrus juice (usually lime or lemon juice) was added to the recipe to cut down on the water's foulness. Although they did not know the reason at the time, Admiral Edward Vernon's sailors were healthier than the rest of the navy, due to the daily doses of vitamin C that prevented disease (mainly scurvy).[1] This custom, in time, got the British the nickname limeys for the limes they consumed.

              It is very widely believed that the name "grog" came from the nickname of Admiral Edward "Old Grog" Vernon, but since the word appears in a book written by Daniel Defoe in 1718, well before Admiral Vernon's West Indian career began, and 22 years before his famous order to dilute the rum ration, this cannot be so. Significantly, it is in the 1718 book (The Family Instructor, Part II) a little former slave boy, Toby, from Barbados, who is the character using the word, stating that "the black mans" in the West Indies "make the sugar, make the grog, much great work, much weary work all day long." Since Defoe had trading interests which gave him connections at the great seaports of the day, it is likely that he had heard the word used by similar visitors to Britain from the West Indies. At any rate, the word seems to definitely have entered English from the West Indies - it may have an African origin. It is likely, therefore, that "Old Grog"'s nickname came from the drink, rather than from his cloak and that his family put about the story about the grogram cloak to cover up this minor shame. However, while the word "grog" referring to rum antedates Vernon's rations, the use of the word to refer to diluted rum may post-date him.  From:   http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Grog

              --- In new_distillers@yahoogroups.com, "Harry" <gnikomson2000@...> wrote:
              >
              > --- In new_distillers@yahoogroups.com, "jamesonbeam1"
              > jamesonbeam1@ wrote:
              >
              > >
              > > The term "Proof", originated in the 18th century when the British
              > > sailors were allocated their daily issue of grog - Gin (American
              > > sailors were issued Rum of course, before and during the
              > Revolutionary
              > > war:).
              > >
              > > This practice is continued today, but now only with the officers
              > (dang
              > > Bureaucracy lol) the original gin issued was from Black Friars
              > > Distillery in Plymouth, England and is the oldest operating Gin
              > > distillery in England (its still the brand issued to the officers
              > on
              > > HMS ships).
              >
              >
              > Jim,
              >
              > There's an awful lot of Rum drinkers out there who would argue the
              > point here. So here's a few snippets to add to the story. :)
              >
              > As I understand it, rather than being officially 'issued', Gin was
              > aparently the 'drink of preference' for the Royal Navy officers. One
              > source says it's more British Army. The history of Plymouth Gin is
              > some 200 years while Rum in the Royal Navy has been official for 300
              > years. And Gin is not 'Grog'. That honour belongs to Navy Rum,
              > specifically Pusser's Rum, so named after the ship's Purser whose job
              > it was to issue it.
              >
              > Navy Rum got the name 'Grog' thus...
              > Grog: The name is derived from "Old Grogram," the nickname of British
              > Rear Admiral Edward Vernon (and the cloak he wore) who ordered his
              > sailors' rum ration diluted to prevent hoarding and drunkenness. Grog
              > is water and rum cut together, and a proper grog had lime juice to
              > help stave off scurvy and a measure of cane sugar to aid in taste.
              > The concoction was served from a barrel on the deck, often called a
              > scuttlebutt.
              > See the Pusser's Rum link at the end of this post.
              >
              > <ext>
              > Gin, being a cheap alcoholic beverage, was originally bought by the
              > poor and caused considerable social problems, illustrated and
              > satirised by the engraving 'Gin Lane' by Hogarth in 1751. Ironically
              > for Plymouth, just as the spirit given in quantity to mellow common
              > seamen was Navy Rum, so the officers preferred Gin, which spread
              > through the officers' messes and golf clubs of Empire. The
              > cocktail 'Pink Gin' was claimed to have been invented as a means to
              > get sailors to drink Angostura bitters in an attempt to curb the
              > malnourishment that was rife on long voyages in those days. The world
              > responsibilities and deployment of the British Royal Navy led to the
              > renown, and wide consumption of the product.
              _____snip_____

              > Slainte!
              > regards Harry
              >

            • jamesonbeam1
              LOL, Will always kowtow to Harry when we get into these discussions - why i called myself a history bluff , not buff lol. Knew someone would question it. Now
              Message 6 of 6 , Apr 20, 2008
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                LOL,

                Will always kowtow to Harry when we get into these discussions - why
                i called myself a history "bluff", not buff lol. Knew someone would
                question it.

                Now lets get back to that discussion on Lesbos drinks :):):).

                Vino es Veritas,
                Jim.


                --- In new_distillers@yahoogroups.com, "jamesonbeam1"
                <jamesonbeam1@...> wrote:
                Hi Phil,

                Interesting questions. Being somewhat of a history bluff, let me give
                you my understandings (Im sure some will come up with other
                reasons)...

                The term "Proof", originated in the 18th century when the British
                sailors were allocated their daily issue of grog - Gin (American
                sailors were issued Rum of course, before and during the Revolutionary
                war:).

                ___snip____
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