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my pot still

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  • Geoff Redman
    Hello all, Awhile ago I promised John V that I would send info on my setup. Attached is a diagram of my pot still. I bought only some copper tubing and some
    Message 1 of 8 , Feb 2, 2002
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      Hello all,

      Awhile ago I promised John V that I would send info on my setup.
      Attached is a diagram of my pot still. I bought only some copper tubing
      and some brass compression fittings and used some stuff around the house
      to build something to do the trick. No theory was considered in the
      design; I put my boiler on the kitchen stove-top, the condenser coil
      inside a mop pail in the kitchen sink, and placed a length of copper
      tubing between them. As luck would have it, I get some nicely flavoured
      spirits (mainly schnapps) in the following manner.

      The first distillation run converts a wash with an ethanol concentration
      of 10% to 20% abv into an approximately 40% abv spirit. I put 5 to 6 L
      of wash into the boiler, toss the first 50mL down the drain and collect
      the remaining distillate in 100mL increments until the ethanol
      concentration drops to 10% abv. I get a lot of good flavours and most
      of the ethanol (e.g. maybe >75%) at the cost of including a lot of bad
      stuff (e.g. fusel oils, etc.). So at this point, the distillate tastes
      like crap.

      It may take 4 to 6 similar runs to work through a 20 to 30 L wash.
      After the whole wash has been reduced to a 40% spirit I'll usually clean
      the still by running some vinegar/water through the system, and then
      rinse by running water. I find these cleaning steps necessary to clear
      out all of the bad tasting oils left by the tails of the first
      distillation runs, or else the heads of the second distillation run will
      be significantly yet needlessly degraded.

      The second distillation run converts the 40% abv spirit to a 75% to 80%
      spirit. It seems that starting with the higher concentration of ethanol
      makes more efficient both the ethanol extraction and the exclusion of
      the bad flavours in the tails of the run. I collect the distillate in
      100mL increments until the ethanol concentration drops to 60% to 70%
      abv. All the good stuff gets poured through a funnel into a glass
      gallon jug as soon as it is collected. I make the cut when I detect
      the first hints of bad stuff (e.g. "wet cardboard" taste) in the
      distillate. Actually, I can't smell directly 'a small quantity' of bad
      stuff while it is within the distillate, but I've found recently that I
      can smell it easily on a large surface off of which the tainted spirits
      have evaporated. Each time I collect 100mL and pour it through the
      funnel, I shake off the funnel (as wiping would remove most of the bad
      smelling oils) and set it aside for a minute to let the distillate
      evaporate completely. Once I smell even the slightest undesirable odour
      in the dried funnel, I divert the remaining distillate to a new glass
      jug labeled "tails". I continue collecting the distillate until the
      ethanol concentration drops to 30% to 40% abv. These tails can be added
      to the next wash.

      I don't use temperature as a guide for making cuts. In fact, my
      thermometer is little more than a fragile pressure valve.

      I've found that the spirits obtained with this technique are quite
      smooth even before aging and flavouring.

      Any comments on the diagram or otherwise would be appreciated.

      cheers,
      geoff
    • rogan_mclean
      Describe the silicone seal. how do you load and empty the wash from your boiler? I am considering modifying pressure cooker. I know it s been done before, and
      Message 2 of 8 , Feb 19, 2002
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        Describe the silicone seal. how do you load and empty the wash from your boiler? I am considering modifying pressure cooker. I know it's been done before, and i know some people say its a waste of time.
        What is your boiler, exactly? Is it a pressure cooker, or just a large pot?
        --- In new_distillers@y..., Geoff Redman <gredman@c...> wrote:
        > Hello all,
        >
        > Awhile ago I promised John V that I would send info on my setup.
        > Attached is a diagram of my pot still. I bought only some copper tubing
        > and some brass compression fittings and used some stuff around the house
        > to build something to do the trick. No theory was considered in the
        > design; I put my boiler on the kitchen stove-top, the condenser coil
        > inside a mop pail in the kitchen sink, and placed a length of copper
        > tubing between them. As luck would have it, I get some nicely flavoured
        > spirits (mainly schnapps) in the following manner.
        >
        > The first distillation run converts a wash with an ethanol concentration
        > of 10% to 20% abv into an approximately 40% abv spirit. I put 5 to 6 L
        > of wash into the boiler, toss the first 50mL down the drain and collect
        > the remaining distillate in 100mL increments until the ethanol
        > concentration drops to 10% abv. I get a lot of good flavours and most
        > of the ethanol (e.g. maybe >75%) at the cost of including a lot of bad
        > stuff (e.g. fusel oils, etc.). So at this point, the distillate tastes
        > like crap.
        >
        > It may take 4 to 6 similar runs to work through a 20 to 30 L wash.
        > After the whole wash has been reduced to a 40% spirit I'll usually clean
        > the still by running some vinegar/water through the system, and then
        > rinse by running water. I find these cleaning steps necessary to clear
        > out all of the bad tasting oils left by the tails of the first
        > distillation runs, or else the heads of the second distillation run will
        > be significantly yet needlessly degraded.
        >
        > The second distillation run converts the 40% abv spirit to a 75% to 80%
        > spirit. It seems that starting with the higher concentration of ethanol
        > makes more efficient both the ethanol extraction and the exclusion of
        > the bad flavours in the tails of the run. I collect the distillate in
        > 100mL increments until the ethanol concentration drops to 60% to 70%
        > abv. All the good stuff gets poured through a funnel into a glass
        > gallon jug as soon as it is collected. I make the cut when I detect
        > the first hints of bad stuff (e.g. "wet cardboard" taste) in the
        > distillate. Actually, I can't smell directly 'a small quantity' of bad
        > stuff while it is within the distillate, but I've found recently that I
        > can smell it easily on a large surface off of which the tainted spirits
        > have evaporated. Each time I collect 100mL and pour it through the
        > funnel, I shake off the funnel (as wiping would remove most of the bad
        > smelling oils) and set it aside for a minute to let the distillate
        > evaporate completely. Once I smell even the slightest undesirable odour
        > in the dried funnel, I divert the remaining distillate to a new glass
        > jug labeled "tails". I continue collecting the distillate until the
        > ethanol concentration drops to 30% to 40% abv. These tails can be added
        > to the next wash.
        >
        > I don't use temperature as a guide for making cuts. In fact, my
        > thermometer is little more than a fragile pressure valve.
        >
        > I've found that the spirits obtained with this technique are quite
        > smooth even before aging and flavouring.
        >
        > Any comments on the diagram or otherwise would be appreciated.
        >
        > cheers,
        > geoff
      • Geoff Redman
        Hi Roger, The boiler is just a large pot with a lid. Filling and emptying is fairly straight-forward: I take the lid off to pour in or dump out stuff. To form
        Message 3 of 8 , Feb 19, 2002
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          Hi Roger,

          The boiler is just a large pot with a lid. Filling and emptying is fairly straight-forward: I take the lid off to pour in or dump out stuff.

          To form the seal, I put a 3/16" bead of high temperature food-grade silicone rubber around the lip of the lid. I greased the top edge of the pot with olive oil (my choice of household mould release) and
          pressed carefully the lid onto the pot, just enough to form a complete seal. I left the lid on the pot undisturbed for a couple of days while the seal cured. Then I lifted gently as possible the lid with
          the seal attached off of the pot.

          Many pressure cookers have an adequate seal already built in, so I'm not sure you'd have to worry about the silicone seal.

          geoff

          rogan_mclean wrote:

          > Describe the silicone seal. how do you load and empty the wash from your boiler? I am considering modifying pressure cooker. I know it's been done before, and i know some people say its a waste of time.
          > What is your boiler, exactly? Is it a pressure cooker, or just a large pot?
        • John Vandermeulen
          Rogan, my system is a steel kettle (18L) & flat steel lid. The column is bolted to the lid with wing-nuts sothat I can remove it if I want to. Actually, I am
          Message 4 of 8 , Feb 19, 2002
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            Rogan,
            my system is a steel kettle (18L) & flat steel lid. The column is bolted to the lid with wing-nuts sothat I can remove it if I want to. Actually, I am looking for a stainless steel dough pan of th same
            diameter, and use that instead of the flat lid.
            For the seal between lid and kettle I used to use one length of tygon (transparent) tubing sliced in two length-wise.. It was held in place with a few bits of masking tape or duct tape. I then applied 4
            or 5 small C-clamps to firmly hold lid onto kettle.
            This worked v. well but I got paranoid about trace chemicals & eliminated the tygon tubing seal. Actually I suspect that there is no problem with it. Anyway - For the last 5 or 6 runs I have simply run a
            length of duct tape around the lid/kettle join. And no problems - no leaks, no stray chemicals.
            I have used the silicon and other sealants in tubes, and they work fine, provided one allows ample time for those compounds to mature, as they have first to lose all the volatiles that keep them soft and
            malleable inside the tube.
            John V

            rogan_mclean wrote:

            > Describe the silicone seal. how do you load and empty the wash from your boiler? I am considering modifying pressure cooker. I know it's been done before, and i know some people say its a waste of time.
            > What is your boiler, exactly? Is it a pressure cooker, or just a large pot?
            > --- In new_distillers@y..., Geoff Redman <gredman@c...> wrote:
            > > Hello all,
            > >
            > > Awhile ago I promised John V that I would send info on my setup.
            > > Attached is a diagram of my pot still. I bought only some copper tubing
            > > and some brass compression fittings and used some stuff around the house
            > > to build something to do the trick. No theory was considered in the
            > > design; I put my boiler on the kitchen stove-top, the condenser coil
            > > inside a mop pail in the kitchen sink, and placed a length of copper
            > > tubing between them. As luck would have it, I get some nicely flavoured
            > > spirits (mainly schnapps) in the following manner.
            > >
            > > The first distillation run converts a wash with an ethanol concentration
            > > of 10% to 20% abv into an approximately 40% abv spirit. I put 5 to 6 L
            > > of wash into the boiler, toss the first 50mL down the drain and collect
            > > the remaining distillate in 100mL increments until the ethanol
            > > concentration drops to 10% abv. I get a lot of good flavours and most
            > > of the ethanol (e.g. maybe >75%) at the cost of including a lot of bad
            > > stuff (e.g. fusel oils, etc.). So at this point, the distillate tastes
            > > like crap.
            > >
            > > It may take 4 to 6 similar runs to work through a 20 to 30 L wash.
            > > After the whole wash has been reduced to a 40% spirit I'll usually clean
            > > the still by running some vinegar/water through the system, and then
            > > rinse by running water. I find these cleaning steps necessary to clear
            > > out all of the bad tasting oils left by the tails of the first
            > > distillation runs, or else the heads of the second distillation run will
            > > be significantly yet needlessly degraded.
            > >
            > > The second distillation run converts the 40% abv spirit to a 75% to 80%
            > > spirit. It seems that starting with the higher concentration of ethanol
            > > makes more efficient both the ethanol extraction and the exclusion of
            > > the bad flavours in the tails of the run. I collect the distillate in
            > > 100mL increments until the ethanol concentration drops to 60% to 70%
            > > abv. All the good stuff gets poured through a funnel into a glass
            > > gallon jug as soon as it is collected. I make the cut when I detect
            > > the first hints of bad stuff (e.g. "wet cardboard" taste) in the
            > > distillate. Actually, I can't smell directly 'a small quantity' of bad
            > > stuff while it is within the distillate, but I've found recently that I
            > > can smell it easily on a large surface off of which the tainted spirits
            > > have evaporated. Each time I collect 100mL and pour it through the
            > > funnel, I shake off the funnel (as wiping would remove most of the bad
            > > smelling oils) and set it aside for a minute to let the distillate
            > > evaporate completely. Once I smell even the slightest undesirable odour
            > > in the dried funnel, I divert the remaining distillate to a new glass
            > > jug labeled "tails". I continue collecting the distillate until the
            > > ethanol concentration drops to 30% to 40% abv. These tails can be added
            > > to the next wash.
            > >
            > > I don't use temperature as a guide for making cuts. In fact, my
            > > thermometer is little more than a fragile pressure valve.
            > >
            > > I've found that the spirits obtained with this technique are quite
            > > smooth even before aging and flavouring.
            > >
            > > Any comments on the diagram or otherwise would be appreciated.
            > >
            > > cheers,
            > > geoff
            >
            >
            > To unsubscribe from this group, send an email to:
            > new_distillers-unsubscribe@onelist.com
            >
            >
            >
            > Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to http://docs.yahoo.com/info/terms/
          • Geoff Redman
            ... whoops! Did I say Roger ? Sorry Rogan. geoff
            Message 5 of 8 , Feb 19, 2002
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              Geoff Redman wrote:

              > Hi Roger,

              whoops! Did I say 'Roger'?

              Sorry Rogan.

              geoff
            • rogan_mclean
              So loading and emptying your boiler requires breaking the seal between lid and pot, and reforming it (duct tape & clamps, or tygon & clamps, or
              Message 6 of 8 , Feb 19, 2002
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                So loading and emptying your boiler requires breaking the seal between lid and pot, and reforming it (duct tape & clamps, or tygon & clamps, or silicone+maturing time & clamps)) each time?

                --- In new_distillers@y..., John Vandermeulen <vandermeulen@n...> wrote:
                > Rogan,
                > my system is a steel kettle (18L) & flat steel lid. The column is bolted to the lid with wing-nuts sothat I can remove it if I want to. Actually, I am looking for a stainless steel dough pan of th same
                > diameter, and use that instead of the flat lid.
                > For the seal between lid and kettle I used to use one length of tygon (transparent) tubing sliced in two length-wise.. It was held in place with a few bits of masking tape or duct tape. I then applied 4
                > or 5 small C-clamps to firmly hold lid onto kettle.
                > This worked v. well but I got paranoid about trace chemicals & eliminated the tygon tubing seal. Actually I suspect that there is no problem with it. Anyway - For the last 5 or 6 runs I have simply run a
                > length of duct tape around the lid/kettle join. And no problems - no leaks, no stray chemicals.
                > I have used the silicon and other sealants in tubes, and they work fine, provided one allows ample time for those compounds to mature, as they have first to lose all the volatiles that keep them soft and
                > malleable inside the tube.
                > John V
                >
                > rogan_mclean wrote:
                >
                > > Describe the silicone seal. how do you load and empty the wash from your boiler? I am considering modifying pressure cooker. I know it's been done before, and i know some people say its a waste of time.
                > > What is your boiler, exactly? Is it a pressure cooker, or just a large pot?
                > > --- In new_distillers@y..., Geoff Redman <gredman@c...> wrote:
                > > > Hello all,
                > > >
                > > > Awhile ago I promised John V that I would send info on my setup.
                > > > Attached is a diagram of my pot still. I bought only some copper tubing
                > > > and some brass compression fittings and used some stuff around the house
                > > > to build something to do the trick. No theory was considered in the
                > > > design; I put my boiler on the kitchen stove-top, the condenser coil
                > > > inside a mop pail in the kitchen sink, and placed a length of copper
                > > > tubing between them. As luck would have it, I get some nicely flavoured
                > > > spirits (mainly schnapps) in the following manner.
                > > >
                > > > The first distillation run converts a wash with an ethanol concentration
                > > > of 10% to 20% abv into an approximately 40% abv spirit. I put 5 to 6 L
                > > > of wash into the boiler, toss the first 50mL down the drain and collect
                > > > the remaining distillate in 100mL increments until the ethanol
                > > > concentration drops to 10% abv. I get a lot of good flavours and most
                > > > of the ethanol (e.g. maybe >75%) at the cost of including a lot of bad
                > > > stuff (e.g. fusel oils, etc.). So at this point, the distillate tastes
                > > > like crap.
                > > >
                > > > It may take 4 to 6 similar runs to work through a 20 to 30 L wash.
                > > > After the whole wash has been reduced to a 40% spirit I'll usually clean
                > > > the still by running some vinegar/water through the system, and then
                > > > rinse by running water. I find these cleaning steps necessary to clear
                > > > out all of the bad tasting oils left by the tails of the first
                > > > distillation runs, or else the heads of the second distillation run will
                > > > be significantly yet needlessly degraded.
                > > >
                > > > The second distillation run converts the 40% abv spirit to a 75% to 80%
                > > > spirit. It seems that starting with the higher concentration of ethanol
                > > > makes more efficient both the ethanol extraction and the exclusion of
                > > > the bad flavours in the tails of the run. I collect the distillate in
                > > > 100mL increments until the ethanol concentration drops to 60% to 70%
                > > > abv. All the good stuff gets poured through a funnel into a glass
                > > > gallon jug as soon as it is collected. I make the cut when I detect
                > > > the first hints of bad stuff (e.g. "wet cardboard" taste) in the
                > > > distillate. Actually, I can't smell directly 'a small quantity' of bad
                > > > stuff while it is within the distillate, but I've found recently that I
                > > > can smell it easily on a large surface off of which the tainted spirits
                > > > have evaporated. Each time I collect 100mL and pour it through the
                > > > funnel, I shake off the funnel (as wiping would remove most of the bad
                > > > smelling oils) and set it aside for a minute to let the distillate
                > > > evaporate completely. Once I smell even the slightest undesirable odour
                > > > in the dried funnel, I divert the remaining distillate to a new glass
                > > > jug labeled "tails". I continue collecting the distillate until the
                > > > ethanol concentration drops to 30% to 40% abv. These tails can be added
                > > > to the next wash.
                > > >
                > > > I don't use temperature as a guide for making cuts. In fact, my
                > > > thermometer is little more than a fragile pressure valve.
                > > >
                > > > I've found that the spirits obtained with this technique are quite
                > > > smooth even before aging and flavouring.
                > > >
                > > > Any comments on the diagram or otherwise would be appreciated.
                > > >
                > > > cheers,
                > > > geoff
                > >
                > >
                > > To unsubscribe from this group, send an email to:
                > > new_distillers-unsubscribe@o...
                > >
                > >
                > >
                > > Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to http://docs.yahoo.com/info/terms/
              • Geoff Redman
                Hello Rogan, ... I ve only ever had to form the silicone rubber seal once. I ve used it many, many times and it s still stuck to the lid. I just take the
                Message 7 of 8 , Feb 19, 2002
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                  Hello Rogan,

                  > So loading and emptying your boiler requires breaking the seal between lid and pot, and reforming it (duct tape & clamps, or tygon & clamps, or silicone+maturing time & clamps)) each time?

                  I've only ever had to form the silicone rubber seal once. I've used it many, many times and it's still stuck to the lid. I just take the bungy cord clamps off, and pull the lid right off the pot (the lid stays
                  attached to the lyne arm) with no problems. It takes just seconds to take the lid off, dump the spent wash, put in some new wash, put the lid on and start heating the boiler again. Beware of steam burns
                  though.

                  geoff
                • John Vandermeulen
                  Only duct tape and 4 small c-clamps. In fact, I run a sharp knife through the tape seal around the lid, between lid rim and kettle rim, and peel it off or
                  Message 8 of 8 , Feb 20, 2002
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                    Only duct tape and 4 small c-clamps. In fact, I run a sharp knife through the tape seal around the lid, between lid rim and kettle rim, and peel it off or just put a new piece of duct tape over top the next
                    time.
                    John V

                    rogan_mclean wrote:

                    > So loading and emptying your boiler requires breaking the seal between lid and pot, and reforming it (duct tape & clamps, or tygon & clamps, or silicone+maturing time & clamps)) each time?
                    >
                    > --- In new_distillers@y..., John Vandermeulen <vandermeulen@n...> wrote:
                    > > Rogan,
                    > > my system is a steel kettle (18L) & flat steel lid. The column is bolted to the lid with wing-nuts sothat I can remove it if I want to. Actually, I am looking for a stainless steel dough pan of th same
                    > > diameter, and use that instead of the flat lid.
                    > > For the seal between lid and kettle I used to use one length of tygon (transparent) tubing sliced in two length-wise.. It was held in place with a few bits of masking tape or duct tape. I then applied 4
                    > > or 5 small C-clamps to firmly hold lid onto kettle.
                    > > This worked v. well but I got paranoid about trace chemicals & eliminated the tygon tubing seal. Actually I suspect that there is no problem with it. Anyway - For the last 5 or 6 runs I have simply run a
                    > > length of duct tape around the lid/kettle join. And no problems - no leaks, no stray chemicals.
                    > > I have used the silicon and other sealants in tubes, and they work fine, provided one allows ample time for those compounds to mature, as they have first to lose all the volatiles that keep them soft and
                    > > malleable inside the tube.
                    > > John V
                    > >
                    > > rogan_mclean wrote:
                    > >
                    > > > Describe the silicone seal. how do you load and empty the wash from your boiler? I am considering modifying pressure cooker. I know it's been done before, and i know some people say its a waste of time.
                    > > > What is your boiler, exactly? Is it a pressure cooker, or just a large pot?
                    > > > --- In new_distillers@y..., Geoff Redman <gredman@c...> wrote:
                    > > > > Hello all,
                    > > > >
                    > > > > Awhile ago I promised John V that I would send info on my setup.
                    > > > > Attached is a diagram of my pot still. I bought only some copper tubing
                    > > > > and some brass compression fittings and used some stuff around the house
                    > > > > to build something to do the trick. No theory was considered in the
                    > > > > design; I put my boiler on the kitchen stove-top, the condenser coil
                    > > > > inside a mop pail in the kitchen sink, and placed a length of copper
                    > > > > tubing between them. As luck would have it, I get some nicely flavoured
                    > > > > spirits (mainly schnapps) in the following manner.
                    > > > >
                    > > > > The first distillation run converts a wash with an ethanol concentration
                    > > > > of 10% to 20% abv into an approximately 40% abv spirit. I put 5 to 6 L
                    > > > > of wash into the boiler, toss the first 50mL down the drain and collect
                    > > > > the remaining distillate in 100mL increments until the ethanol
                    > > > > concentration drops to 10% abv. I get a lot of good flavours and most
                    > > > > of the ethanol (e.g. maybe >75%) at the cost of including a lot of bad
                    > > > > stuff (e.g. fusel oils, etc.). So at this point, the distillate tastes
                    > > > > like crap.
                    > > > >
                    > > > > It may take 4 to 6 similar runs to work through a 20 to 30 L wash.
                    > > > > After the whole wash has been reduced to a 40% spirit I'll usually clean
                    > > > > the still by running some vinegar/water through the system, and then
                    > > > > rinse by running water. I find these cleaning steps necessary to clear
                    > > > > out all of the bad tasting oils left by the tails of the first
                    > > > > distillation runs, or else the heads of the second distillation run will
                    > > > > be significantly yet needlessly degraded.
                    > > > >
                    > > > > The second distillation run converts the 40% abv spirit to a 75% to 80%
                    > > > > spirit. It seems that starting with the higher concentration of ethanol
                    > > > > makes more efficient both the ethanol extraction and the exclusion of
                    > > > > the bad flavours in the tails of the run. I collect the distillate in
                    > > > > 100mL increments until the ethanol concentration drops to 60% to 70%
                    > > > > abv. All the good stuff gets poured through a funnel into a glass
                    > > > > gallon jug as soon as it is collected. I make the cut when I detect
                    > > > > the first hints of bad stuff (e.g. "wet cardboard" taste) in the
                    > > > > distillate. Actually, I can't smell directly 'a small quantity' of bad
                    > > > > stuff while it is within the distillate, but I've found recently that I
                    > > > > can smell it easily on a large surface off of which the tainted spirits
                    > > > > have evaporated. Each time I collect 100mL and pour it through the
                    > > > > funnel, I shake off the funnel (as wiping would remove most of the bad
                    > > > > smelling oils) and set it aside for a minute to let the distillate
                    > > > > evaporate completely. Once I smell even the slightest undesirable odour
                    > > > > in the dried funnel, I divert the remaining distillate to a new glass
                    > > > > jug labeled "tails". I continue collecting the distillate until the
                    > > > > ethanol concentration drops to 30% to 40% abv. These tails can be added
                    > > > > to the next wash.
                    > > > >
                    > > > > I don't use temperature as a guide for making cuts. In fact, my
                    > > > > thermometer is little more than a fragile pressure valve.
                    > > > >
                    > > > > I've found that the spirits obtained with this technique are quite
                    > > > > smooth even before aging and flavouring.
                    > > > >
                    > > > > Any comments on the diagram or otherwise would be appreciated.
                    > > > >
                    > > > > cheers,
                    > > > > geoff
                    > > >
                    > > >
                    > > > To unsubscribe from this group, send an email to:
                    > > > new_distillers-unsubscribe@o...
                    > > >
                    > > >
                    > > >
                    > > > Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to http://docs.yahoo.com/info/terms/
                    >
                    >
                    > To unsubscribe from this group, send an email to:
                    > new_distillers-unsubscribe@onelist.com
                    >
                    >
                    >
                    > Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to http://docs.yahoo.com/info/terms/
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