Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

Hops (was) Re: longtime listener/first time distiller

Expand Messages
  • Trid
    ... Gentlemen, *snicker* That of which your speak is not unheard of, nor unprecedented, nor bad (IMHO). Distilled hopped beer is known as Bierschnaps and if
    Message 1 of 12 , Feb 1, 2008
    • 0 Attachment
      --- In new_distillers@yahoogroups.com, "bbornais" <bbornais@...> wrote:
      >
      > I am a serious home brewer myself (stemmed off of distialation
      > theory, strangely enough), and would like to know the results of this
      > experiment.
      >
      > My assumption would be that the aromatic flavours from the hops would
      > overwhelm what could have been a very balanced whiskey, and that
      > ageing would be a problem because you would ruin any barrel that you
      > put this concentrated hops whiskey into.
      >
      > If you have made whiskey successfully before, and, as such, know the
      > process, then I think it would be an interesting experiment.
      >
      > For ageing, do not use a barrel, use a glass carboy with disposeable
      > oak chips.
      >
      > If you are an all grain brewer like me, then you will find this
      > experiment a great sacrifice to a hard day's work!
      >
      > I would like to know myself for the simple fact that no one has aged
      > a hopped distillate before.
      >
      > This brings about another expiriment, which would be a hopped pure
      > corn whiskey, that does not require ageing.
      >
      > I am with you, because I know how tasty a nice fresh batch of hops
      > can be.
      >
      > To conclude:
      >
      > DOOO ITTTT!

      Gentlemen,
      *snicker*

      That of which your speak is not unheard of, nor unprecedented, nor bad
      (IMHO).

      Distilled hopped beer is known as "Bierschnaps" and if you tickle Mr.
      Google just right, he'll reveal some commercially available varieties
      of it. A brewer friend of mine and I got together a couple years ago
      and ran 10 gallons of some ale that had been sitting around for too
      long and tasted too ester-y for his taste. It's been sitting on
      medium-dark toasted French oak since, and occasionally we'll draw a
      sample from the gallon of final product we extracted. The hops gives
      it a refreshing tartness that I rather like...not at all overpowering
      or offputting.

      Some tidbits and articles:
      http://thespiritworld.net/2007/01/08/whiskey/
      http://www.essentialspirits.com/products.asp?Id=esBS101
      http://www.tastings.com/scout_spirits.lasso?id=179486

      I like it well enough that I'll definitely be making more in the near
      future. Although, I could see the hops shortage making this sort of
      experiment expensive.

      Trid
      -just call me Hop-along
    Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.