Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

Refractometer -v- Hydrometer

Expand Messages
  • Eddie Ferguson
    Hi all! This may have been discussed before, but I didn t see it anywhere in the posts. I m still learning a LOT about this whole process, but I also just
    Message 1 of 5 , Dec 24, 2007
    • 0 Attachment
      Hi all! This may have been discussed before, but I didn't see it anywhere in the posts. I'm still learning a LOT about this whole process, but I also just wanted to maybe spark a little conversation. Soooo...the questions are:

      What can you do with one that you can't do with the other?

      If you could only have one, which one would ya have?

      Why/why not have both?

      And finally...I hear a lot of talk in here and on other sites about hydrometers, but not much about refractometers. Can you do this with only a refractometer, or do you need a hydrometer.

      Anyway, just thought I'd spark up some conversation. Hope you are having a good holiday season!
      Eddie



      Be a better friend, newshound, and know-it-all with Yahoo! Mobile. Try it now.
    • jamesonbeam1
      Hi again Eddie, You want some conversation - okey buddy - refractometers are very nice (for rich yuppie types who make wine, beer or distill- like maybe the
      Message 2 of 5 , Dec 24, 2007
      • 0 Attachment
        Hi again Eddie,

        You want some conversation - okey buddy - refractometers are very
        nice (for rich yuppie types who make wine, beer or distill- like
        maybe the Kennedys or the Bill Gates, etc).

        One of the best that is offered (a nice digital one) can be found at:
        http://www.misco.com/products/PA203-003-128-129-194-195.html
        for a pautry cost of $525.00 US...

        But, if your like most of us poor folk distillers, you can get a wine
        or a proof hydrometer for around $6.25 to $8.00 US that are just as
        effective, but you do need to use a temp correction chart hehe.

        Vino es Veritas and Happy Holidays,
        Jim

        "Everyone to their own taste said the old lady as she kissed the
        cow..."

        _______________________

        --- In new_distillers@yahoogroups.com, Eddie Ferguson <joeninpo@...>
        wrote:
        >
        > Hi all! This may have been discussed before, but I didn't see it
        anywhere in the posts. I'm still learning a LOT about this whole
        process, but I also just wanted to maybe spark a little conversation.
        Soooo...the questions are:
        >
        > What can you do with one that you can't do with the other?
        >
        > If you could only have one, which one would ya have?
        >
        > Why/why not have both?
        >
        > And finally...I hear a lot of talk in here and on other sites about
        hydrometers, but not much about refractometers. Can you do this with
        only a refractometer, or do you need a hydrometer.
        >
        > Anyway, just thought I'd spark up some conversation. Hope you are
        having a good holiday season!
        > Eddie
        >
        >
        >
        >
        > ---------------------------------
        > Be a better friend, newshound, and know-it-all with Yahoo! Mobile.
        Try it now.
        >
      • Eddie Ferguson
        Wow! That s pretty steep for a refractometer. The reason I brought this whole thing up was because my wife already had one that she uses for her hobby. She s a
        Message 3 of 5 , Dec 24, 2007
        • 0 Attachment
          Wow! That's pretty steep for a refractometer. The reason I brought this whole thing up was because my wife already had one that she uses for her hobby. She's a salt water tank nut. The one that she uses costs around $40 and it seems to work fine.

          Now, the cost is considerably more, which is why I asked some of the questions. She wants me to go out and get my own stuff :-) Just curious to see if there was a big difference. And anyway, it seemed a bit quiet on here lately, so thought I'd just throw that out there...

          Eddie

          jamesonbeam1 <jamesonbeam1@...> wrote:
          Hi again Eddie,

          You want some conversation - okey buddy - refractometers are very
          nice (for rich yuppie types who make wine, beer or distill- like
          maybe the Kennedys or the Bill Gates, etc).

          One of the best that is offered (a nice digital one) can be found at:
          http://www.misco. com/products/ PA203-003- 128-129-194- 195.html
          for a pautry cost of $525.00 US...

          But, if your like most of us poor folk distillers, you can get a wine
          or a proof hydrometer for around $6.25 to $8.00 US that are just as
          effective, but you do need to use a temp correction chart hehe.

          Vino es Veritas and Happy Holidays,
          Jim

          "Everyone to their own taste said the old lady as she kissed the
          cow..."

          ____________ _________ __

          --- In new_distillers@ yahoogroups. com, Eddie Ferguson <joeninpo@.. .>
          wrote:
          >
          > Hi all! This may have been discussed before, but I didn't see it
          anywhere in the posts. I'm still learning a LOT about this whole
          process, but I also just wanted to maybe spark a little conversation.
          Soooo...the questions are:
          >
          > What can you do with one that you can't do with the other?
          >
          > If you could only have one, which one would ya have?
          >
          > Why/why not have both?
          >
          > And finally...I hear a lot of talk in here and on other sites about
          hydrometers, but not much about refractometers. Can you do this with
          only a refractometer, or do you need a hydrometer.
          >
          > Anyway, just thought I'd spark up some conversation. Hope you are
          having a good holiday season!
          > Eddie
          >
          >
          >
          >
          > ------------ --------- --------- ---
          > Be a better friend, newshound, and know-it-all with Yahoo! Mobile.
          Try it now.
          >



          Looking for last minute shopping deals? Find them fast with Yahoo! Search.

        • jp_koning
          Hi Eddie. I use a cheap optical handheld refractometer which costed about 50 box. The benefit is that I need only one drop which I can easily take out of the
          Message 4 of 5 , Jan 1, 2009
          • 0 Attachment
            Hi Eddie.

            I use a cheap optical handheld refractometer which costed about 50 box.
            The benefit is that I need only one drop which I can easily take out of
            the mash.
            My allgrain mashes of rye, cornmeal and barlymalt are mostly very thick
            and sticky and I found it difficult to filter enough (100cc) of clear
            liquid out of the slurry to get my hydrometer floating.
            At first I checked the result whith my hydrometer for comparing, but I
            found I can trust on my Refractometer readings and don't use the hydro
            anymore.

            Gr, Ko.
          • jamesonbeam1
            Very good point Jp, Hydrometers do not work well in a mash/must/wash with a high solid content. This is a real problem in the wine making world as well as
            Message 5 of 5 , Jan 2, 2009
            • 0 Attachment

              Very good point Jp,

              Hydrometers do not work well in a mash/must/wash  with a high solid content.  This is a real problem in  the wine making world as well as the grain mashing world.  Basically if your mash/must/wort/wash (with molassas) contains solids - its tough to get a good SG reading on your hydrometer.  Unless you either have a good filtering mechanism (l have used Melita #2 coffee filters to get solids out with some success) or some type of centrifuge to get the solids out (see below), its hard to get an acurate reading.  While a refractometer works well, it is expensive and from experience,  if you use your taste buds regarding sweetness in the fermentation and measure your sugars/grains mixture right - it might save alot of work and money...

              Vino es Veritas,

              Jim aka Waldo.

              A centrifuge is a piece of equipment, generally driven by a motor, that puts an object in rotation around a fixed axis, applying a force perpendicular to the axis. The centrifuge works using the sedimentation principle, where the centripetal acceleration is used to evenly distribute substances (usually present in a solution for small scale applications) of greater and lesser density. There are many different kinds of centrifuges, including those for very specialised purposes. It can be used for viable counts, when shaking the culture e.g. yeast, out of suspension.


              --- In new_distillers@yahoogroups.com, "jp_koning" <info21@...> wrote:
              >
              > Hi Eddie.
              >
              > I use a cheap optical handheld refractometer which costed about 50 box.
              > The benefit is that I need only one drop which I can easily take out of
              > the mash.
              > My allgrain mashes of rye, cornmeal and barlymalt are mostly very thick
              > and sticky and I found it difficult to filter enough (100cc) of clear
              > liquid out of the slurry to get my hydrometer floating.
              > At first I checked the result whith my hydrometer for comparing, but I
              > found I can trust on my Refractometer readings and don't use the hydro
              > anymore.
              >
              > Gr, Ko.
              >

            Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.