Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

3 day ferment ???

Expand Messages
  • dbanjo0335
    Hello, all! My question for you is just this... People talk about their sugar wash fermenting out in as little as three days. I have tried to replicate this
    Message 1 of 2 , Dec 6, 2007
    • 0 Attachment
      Hello, all! My question for you is just this... People talk about
      their sugar wash fermenting out in as little as three days. I have
      tried to replicate this using a few different recipes. This is the
      one I'm currently using:

      10 pounds white table sugar
      2 pounds dark brown sugar
      2 tablespoons distiller's yeast
      2.5 tablespoons yeast nutrients
      water to make up to 5 gallons

      Dissolve 10 pounds of white table sugar and 2 pounds of dark brown
      sugar in 1 gallon of boiling water. Pour into fermenter and top off
      to 5 gallons using cold water. Cool the wash to below 70 degrees
      F. Stir in 2.5 tablespoons yeast nutrients. Adjust pH to approx
      4.5. Rehydrate yeast as per directions on package, and stir into
      wash. Check specific gravity and close fermenter, putting airlock
      in place.

      The wash I'm working on now has been in the fermenter since November
      21. The initial specific gravity was 1.116 @ 65 degrees F. On
      December 4, bubbling had almost completely ceased and the specific
      gravity was 1.088 @ 69 degrees F. I have made every effort to keep
      the temperature of the wash as close to 70 degrees F as possible. I
      know if I let it go hotter it will ferment faster, but how hot is
      too hot?

      My fermenter is a food grade 22L bucket with a lid. I have a hose
      attached to the lid and run over into another bucket with water in
      it. I do have an airlock I use in a glass carboy when I make wine.
      Would this be better to use? For that matter, would the carboy be
      better to ferment in?

      Basically what I want to know is how can I make a 5 gallon sugar
      wash ferment out to around 18% abv in 3 days?

      Thanks!
      dbanjo
    • Harry
      Comments inline... ... ...............Doable, but usually with low potential fermentations. Under 10% a/v. I have ... ................. kg lb sugar made up to
      Message 2 of 2 , Dec 6, 2007
      • 0 Attachment

        Comments inline...


        --- In new_distillers@yahoogroups.com, "dbanjo0335" <dbanjo0335@...> wrote:
        >
        > Hello, all! My question for you is just this... People talk about
        > their sugar wash fermenting out in as little as three days.

         

        ...............Doable, but usually with low potential fermentations.  Under 10% a/v.

        I have
        > tried to replicate this using a few different recipes. This is the
        > one I'm currently using:
        >
        > 10 pounds white table sugar
        > 2 pounds dark brown sugar
        > 2 tablespoons distiller's yeast
        > 2.5 tablespoons yeast nutrients
        > water to make up to 5 gallons

         

        .................

        sugar made up to total volume
        should have an SG and only require of water
        and should produce a wash of % alcohol

        ...........As you can see from the calculation, your potential a/v is ~17% which is way too high to ferment out in 3 days.  Either lower the sugar to 7 lb, or accept the fact that it's going to take a couple of weeks to attenuate and clear, even with turbo yeast.  Distillers yeast will have problems with attenuating to 17%.  It can do it, but the yeast is stressed and will produce some undesirable off-flavours.

        sugar made up to total volume
        should have an SG and only require of water
        and should produce a wash of % alcohol

         

         


        >
        > Dissolve 10 pounds of white table sugar and 2 pounds of dark brown
        > sugar in 1 gallon of boiling water. Pour into fermenter and top off
        > to 5 gallons using cold water. Cool the wash to below 70 degrees
        > F. Stir in 2.5 tablespoons yeast nutrients. Adjust pH to approx
        > 4.5.

        .................pH 4.5 is way too low.  5.5 is what you want.   The pH scale is logarithymic.  That means that 4.5 pH is 10 TIMES more acidic than 5.5 pH.  Be aware that the acidity will increase as a byproduct in a fermentation as the yeast makes the alcohol.  If you start at 5.5 pH, you'll be fine.  If you start at 4.5 ph, you'll probably kill or severely slow your yeast.  I suspect this is what is happening in your fermentation.  That and too high a sugar content which also causes yeast stress through osmotic pressure.

         

         

         Rehydrate yeast as per directions on package, and stir into
        > wash. Check specific gravity and close fermenter, putting airlock
        > in place.
        >
        > The wash I'm working on now has been in the fermenter since November
        > 21. The initial specific gravity was 1.116 @ 65 degrees F.

        ............Too high for distillers yeast.  In future, use the chart at the bottom of this post as a guide.

         

         On
        > December 4, bubbling had almost completely ceased and the specific
        > gravity was 1.088 @ 69 degrees F.

        ...........Yup, stuck ferment.  Yeast is pooped out for the reasons stated above.

         

        I have made every effort to keep
        > the temperature of the wash as close to 70 degrees F as possible. I
        > know if I let it go hotter it will ferment faster, but how hot is
        > too hot?
        >
        > My fermenter is a food grade 22L bucket with a lid. I have a hose
        > attached to the lid and run over into another bucket with water in
        > it. I do have an airlock I use in a glass carboy when I make wine.
        > Would this be better to use? For that matter, would the carboy be
        > better to ferment in?
        >
        > Basically what I want to know is how can I make a 5 gallon sugar
        > wash ferment out to around 18% abv in 3 days?

        ................You can't.  Even turbo yeasts will take a couple weeks to do this, as stated before.  Distillers yeast won't even get close.  You have to reduce the sugar to speed up the attenuation.  And you have to start with the correct acidic pH level, or you'll kill the thing before it even gets started.

        Slainte!
        regards Harry

        Distillers Wort Chart

        Hydrometer table
        Specific gravity (S.G.)Potential alcohol % vol. Sugar / litre grams

         Notes

        1.0100.912.5

         

        1.0151.625

         

        1.0202.344

         

        1.0253.057

         

        1.0303.776

         

        1.0354.495

         

        1.0405.1107

         

        1.0455.8120

         

        1.0506.5132

        Range average for grain wort

        1.0557.2145
        1.0607.9157.5

         

        1.0658.6170

         

        1.0709.2182.5

         

        1.0759.9195

         

        1.08010.6208

         

        1.08511.3225

         

        1.09012.0240

         

        1.09512.7252

         

        1.10013.4265

        Upper limit for bread yeasts

        1.10514.1277

         

        1.11014.9290

         

        1.11515.6302.5

        Upper limit for wine yeasts

        1.12016.3315

         

        1.12517.0327.5

         

        1.13017.7340

         

        1.13518.4352

        Upper limit for turbo yeasts

         

         

        To set a wort for fermentation:  Use the hydrometer chart and adjust your sugar content for desired potential alcohol and type of yeast used.  After adjustment, take your first hydrometer reading and record it as the Original Gravity (O.G.) figure.

        When fermentation is complete, take your second hydrometer reading and record it as the Final Gravity (F.G.) figure.

        Using the equation for % Alcohol By Volume, you can calculate the actual alcohol content achieved for the wort.  Compare this to the potential alcohol volume given in the chart, and you will get an idea of how efficient, or otherwise, your attenuation is.

        You can also calculate the percentage of Alcohol By Weight which is sometimes used in beer brewing.

        Copyright © 2007 H Jackson.  All rights reserved.

         

      Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.