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Re: stills

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  • Tarvus
    ... the job fine. But ... number of reasons I ... My personal take on it is this: Propane is infinitely adjustable, instantly responsive, and capable of
    Message 1 of 40 , Dec 4, 2007
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      --- In new_distillers@yahoogroups.com, "sn_cur" <sn_cur@...> wrote:
      > Don't disagree that propane is quite safe when used properly, an does
      the job fine. But
      > why is it "better" than electricity? What is the big advantage? For a
      number of reasons I
      > prefer electricity, but I think they are about equal overall.
      >

      My personal take on it is this:
      Propane is infinitely adjustable, instantly responsive, and capable of
      overpowering the still if required (as in the case of running a refluz
      still like a pot still). Any cook who has cooked on a gas stove versus
      an electric stove will almost always prefer the gas. Same in
      distilling.

      On the downside, you basically have to use propane outdoors. You may
      have a slightly higher fire hazard with propane. However, you don't
      have to worry about keeping your elements covered with distillate, so
      the offset is less risk of explosion and more flexibility with small
      batch size.

      Oh yeah - one final advantage - propane works during power outages. :)
    • jamesonbeam1
      PS. Heres a nice little calculator for figuring out the length of condenser needed for your exact requirements from Home Distillers..
      Message 40 of 40 , Jan 15, 2008
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        PS. Heres a nice little calculator for figuring out the length of
        condenser needed for your exact requirements from Home Distillers..

        http://homedistiller.org/cond_calc.htm

        Jim.
        > --- In new_distillers@yahoogroups.com, arthur doremus <sumerod04@>
        > wrote:
        > >
        > > Hi Jim,
        > > Thanks for the info. Finally got the time and all the parts.
        > Using a 16 qt (15.14 L) SS pot, 1/2 OD flexible copper pipe and
        > compression fittings. I have 6 gal of wash (cider and raisins), so
        > doing two 3 gal runs, and depending on how it works, probably a run
        > using the distilate from the first two. I plan on the tubing
        > verticle from the pot about 10-12" then up at 30 degrees for about
        2
        > feet (to get some reflux) then drop to the condenser. Question is-
        > how long a run should I use for the condenser coil? With the
        > material I have, I was planning about 60" in a 7"-8" dia. coil.
        Too
        > much? too little? I'd appreciate your suggestions.
        > > Art
        > > jamesonbeam1 <jamesonbeam1@> wrote:
        > > Hi Art,
        > > Welcome to the wonderful, exciting , thrilling - sometimes
        > chilling world of distilling.
        > > Above all, do not - repeat DO NOT try the ice water / bath /
        wok
        > approach. I wasted a month on that damn thing. After getting my
        > chit together, I went an made me a simple, simple pot still from
        > household equipment, and it still works to this day.
        > > The most simplest design to start with is something like this:
        > >
        > >
        > >
        > >
        > >
        > > Some short cuts i have found is using old 5/8" pieces of garden
        > hose to make flexible couplings. (fits perfectly around 1/2"
        copper
        > pipe for air tight fit.
        > > Also if your to lazy to make a coiled "worm" for you condenser,
        > just get an old 5 - 6 gallon beer cooler and drill a 1/2" hole at
        > bottom and 1/2" hole at top. Then run a straight through "shotgun"
        > 1/2" copper pipe through from top to bottom and seal with plummers
        > putty. Fill with Ice Water every so often - and volia - a
        > condenser...
        > > Just dont make the same mistake I made mon ami.
        > > PS> an old trick i learned from making apple jack is to put it
        > first in 1 gallon jugs and freeze it. Then turn them upside down
        in
        > a can till ice is clear. This makes your must / wort about twice
        as
        > strong - then distill :):):).
        > >
        > > Vino es Veritas and Good Luck,
        > > Jim.
        > >
        > >
        > >
        > >
        > >
        > >
        > > --- In new_distillers@yahoogroups.com, "sumerod04" <sumerod04@>
        > wrote:
        > > >
        > > > I am a real newbie. Been making wine for about 5 years, ready
        for
        > the
        > > > next level. Thought I would start with applejack. Have 23L
        > > > cider+raisins mash almost through the secondary fermentation. I
        > have
        > > > been reading, reading and READING. I plan to try the ice-water
        > wok
        > > > bucket still (the still that isn't a still) modified with a
        > funnel and
        > > > piping to an outside collector and heating element from
        Partyman
        > that
        > > > is supposed to hit 45-50C. It's simple and cheap but could take
        3-
        > 5
        > > > days. Supposedly, you can't separate out the methyl using this.
        > > > Amazingstill.com seems to indicate this isn't a problem. An
        > option
        > > > would be higher temperature allowing the alcohols to separate.
        Or
        > > > would it be smarter starting with a more traditional pot still.
        > At
        > > > this point I'm mainly interested in making applejack, maybe
        > schnappes
        > > > maybe rum. I would appreciate any advice.
        > > > Art
        > > >
        > >
        > >
        > >
        > >
        > >
        > >
        > > ---------------------------------
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        > Search.
        > >
        >
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