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Re: Corn Whiskey Recipes

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  • Tarvus
    ... over ... Hey Rob, They both taste good, but I have not done a side by side comparison. They both definitely taste like corn liquor! :) Try this recipe and
    Message 1 of 28 , Nov 24, 2007
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      --- In new_distillers@yahoogroups.com, "Rob" <robobline@...> wrote:
      >
      >
      > Thank you Tarvus. That is some really great information from both
      > posts.
      >
      > From your recipes, do both taste the same, or do you perfer one
      over
      > the other? Also how much water would one use.
      > Thanks again and I will tring it out very soon.
      > Rob
      >

      Hey Rob,

      They both taste good, but I have not done a side by side comparison.
      They both definitely taste like corn liquor! :)

      Try this recipe and technique
      8.8 ponds corn flour (it comes in 2 kilo sacks)
      11.2 pounds malted corn (finely milled. Measure the weight of the
      malt, not the weight of the corn before you malted it)
      5 gallons water

      Heat 2.5 gallons of water to 165F. Add the grains and mix
      thoroughly. The mash temp should drop to between 145 and 150F. Let
      the mash rest at this temp, stirring occasionally.

      In a separate vessel, heat the balance of the water. You want to
      shoot for a mash temp of 148-150F and the thermal mass of the grain
      mash is somewhat greater than the thermal mass of the 2.5 gallons of
      hot water you'll be adding so take the difference between the mash
      temp and 150 degrees, add that to 150 degrees and then add a few
      degrees more to compensate for thermal mass. (it's better to
      undershoot since you can always heat the mash later if needed). You
      want to heat the 2nd batch of water to this point which you
      calculate. When you add the additional hot water, you should be
      pretty close to your target temp.

      Stir the mash well, cover and let is sit for an hour or two adding
      heat as necessary to keep it in the 148-150F range. Stir
      occasionally.

      Keep covered and allow to cool below 85F. Aerate thoroughly by
      scooping and pouring the wort into your fermenter several times or by
      shaking your carboy if using one of those as a fermenter. Take your
      hydrometer reading before pitching yeast. You can expect something
      in the range of 1.05 with this technique. You probably won't get
      complete 100% conversion of all starch in your mash, but don't sweat
      it. If you use the Prestige Whiskey Distillers yeast, the
      amyloglucosidase in the yeast mix will convert additional starches.

      An electric digital meat thermometer is a real help in all grain
      mashing as you get an instantaneous temp read and don't have to read
      a goo covered immersible thermometer and deal with the lag time a
      thermometer has.

      Some people add sugar to the mash to boost the alcohol yeild, but if
      you do this, it won't be a "pure corn" liquor. It'll be corn flavored
      and it'll probably be good to drink, but it won't be "pure corn".
      Doing a pure corn mash is a lot of work, but it's worth the effort!

      If you do small sequential batches, you might want to use the backset
      from a previous distillation as part of your mash water in subsequent
      mashes. You can also dump your cooled mash onto the dregs from a
      previous fermentation. Both techniques will help develop a "house
      flavor" to your corn liquor. If you search here and in the
      distillers groups on "backset" or "slopping back" you may find some
      useful into on these techniques.

      Let us know how your corn turns out!
      Tarvus
    • John Wisbey
      Count Vladimere Dracula, blimey I didnt know you were into booze. John Wisbey ... From: Count Vladimere Dracula To: new_distillers@yahoogroups.com Sent:
      Message 2 of 28 , Nov 24, 2007
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        Count Vladimere Dracula, blimey I didnt know you were into booze.
        John Wisbey
        ----- Original Message -----
        Sent: Saturday, November 24, 2007 1:55 PM
        Subject: [new_distillers] Re: Corn Whiskey Recipes

        --- In new_distillers@ yahoogroups. com, "Tarvus" <tarvus33991@ ...>
        wrote:
        >
        > --- In new_distillers@ yahoogroups. com, "Rob" <robobline@> wrote:
        > >
        > > Hello all,
        > > Would anyone care to share a good corn recipe with me/us? I
        > would
        >

        .

      • Rob
        ... both ... comparison. ... Let ... grain ... of ... You ... by ... your ... something ... sweat ... read ... if ... flavored ... backset ... subsequent ...
        Message 3 of 28 , Nov 24, 2007
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          --- In new_distillers@yahoogroups.com, "Tarvus" <tarvus33991@...>
          wrote:
          >
          > --- In new_distillers@yahoogroups.com, "Rob" <robobline@> wrote:
          > >
          > >
          > > Thank you Tarvus. That is some really great information from
          both
          > > posts.
          > >
          > > From your recipes, do both taste the same, or do you perfer one
          > over
          > > the other? Also how much water would one use.
          > > Thanks again and I will tring it out very soon.
          > > Rob
          > >
          >
          > Hey Rob,
          >
          > They both taste good, but I have not done a side by side
          comparison.
          > They both definitely taste like corn liquor! :)
          >
          > Try this recipe and technique
          > 8.8 ponds corn flour (it comes in 2 kilo sacks)
          > 11.2 pounds malted corn (finely milled. Measure the weight of the
          > malt, not the weight of the corn before you malted it)
          > 5 gallons water
          >
          > Heat 2.5 gallons of water to 165F. Add the grains and mix
          > thoroughly. The mash temp should drop to between 145 and 150F.
          Let
          > the mash rest at this temp, stirring occasionally.
          >
          > In a separate vessel, heat the balance of the water. You want to
          > shoot for a mash temp of 148-150F and the thermal mass of the
          grain
          > mash is somewhat greater than the thermal mass of the 2.5 gallons
          of
          > hot water you'll be adding so take the difference between the mash
          > temp and 150 degrees, add that to 150 degrees and then add a few
          > degrees more to compensate for thermal mass. (it's better to
          > undershoot since you can always heat the mash later if needed).
          You
          > want to heat the 2nd batch of water to this point which you
          > calculate. When you add the additional hot water, you should be
          > pretty close to your target temp.
          >
          > Stir the mash well, cover and let is sit for an hour or two adding
          > heat as necessary to keep it in the 148-150F range. Stir
          > occasionally.
          >
          > Keep covered and allow to cool below 85F. Aerate thoroughly by
          > scooping and pouring the wort into your fermenter several times or
          by
          > shaking your carboy if using one of those as a fermenter. Take
          your
          > hydrometer reading before pitching yeast. You can expect
          something
          > in the range of 1.05 with this technique. You probably won't get
          > complete 100% conversion of all starch in your mash, but don't
          sweat
          > it. If you use the Prestige Whiskey Distillers yeast, the
          > amyloglucosidase in the yeast mix will convert additional starches.
          >
          > An electric digital meat thermometer is a real help in all grain
          > mashing as you get an instantaneous temp read and don't have to
          read
          > a goo covered immersible thermometer and deal with the lag time a
          > thermometer has.
          >
          > Some people add sugar to the mash to boost the alcohol yeild, but
          if
          > you do this, it won't be a "pure corn" liquor. It'll be corn
          flavored
          > and it'll probably be good to drink, but it won't be "pure corn".
          > Doing a pure corn mash is a lot of work, but it's worth the effort!
          >
          > If you do small sequential batches, you might want to use the
          backset
          > from a previous distillation as part of your mash water in
          subsequent
          > mashes. You can also dump your cooled mash onto the dregs from a
          > previous fermentation. Both techniques will help develop a "house
          > flavor" to your corn liquor. If you search here and in the
          > distillers groups on "backset" or "slopping back" you may find
          some
          > useful into on these techniques.
          >
          > Let us know how your corn turns out!
          > Tarvus
          >
          Tarvus,
          I'll cok up that recipe and let you know how it turns out. Sure
          does sound good.
          Thanks again, Rob
        • Count Vladimere Dracula
          Not many Virgins left in the world so I had to start drinking something else
          Message 4 of 28 , Nov 24, 2007
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            Not many Virgins left in the world so I had to start drinking
            something else
          • Larry
            ... Since he can t remember how to spell Vladimir, he must have been into it pretty deeply!
            Message 5 of 28 , Nov 24, 2007
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              At 12:27 PM 11/24/2007, John wrote:

              Count Vladimere Dracula, blimey I didnt know you were into booze.


              Since he can't remember how to spell Vladimir, he must have been into it pretty deeply! <grin>






            • toddk63
              Here s the one I use and love the results: -Heat 7.0 gal. treated brewing water to 172F -Add 13# cornmeal, add 3 oz. barley (or 1.5 tsp amylase) -Rest 20 min.
              Message 6 of 28 , Nov 26, 2007
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                Here's the one I use and love the results:

                -Heat 7.0 gal. treated brewing water to 172F
                -Add 13# cornmeal, add 3 oz. barley (or 1.5 tsp amylase)
                -Rest 20 min. Keep below 160F
                -Full Boil 20 min. Let air cool (stirring) for 10 min.
                -Add 4# flaked rye . Stir. Add 4 gal cool water. Let cool to 160 F.
                -add 3 oz. barley (or 1.5 tsp amylase)
                -Let cool to 152F. Add 3# barley
                -Mash 120 min between 150-140F (Cover with blankets and stir once
                after 60 min.)
                -Chill below 85F, Add glucodiase (6 tabs Beano)
                -Ferment on the grain at 75-80F
                -Strain and pot still 2 times

                Yields 11.5 gallons to fermenter. Fermented out to 1.004 SG. After
                straining, 8.6 gallons of 7.5% abv to still. The proportions were
                carefully calculated (and tweaked) to optimize the stiffness of the
                corn mush (thinner is better), the final gravity of the wash (more is
                better), and to minimize the amount of cooling time or use of
                chillers. A chiller is still needed after the 120 min mash.

                Todd K.
              • gff_stwrt
                ... Hi, folks, Todd, could you explain in detail, for us less experienced people, your version of treated brewing water ? Thanks;I am saving your recipe and
                Message 7 of 28 , Nov 26, 2007
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                  --- In new_distillers@yahoogroups.com, "toddk63" <toddk63@...> wrote:
                  >
                  > Here's the one I use and love the results:
                  >
                  > -Heat 7.0 gal. treated brewing water to 172F

                  > snip.
                  >
                  > Todd K.
                  >


                  Hi, folks,

                  Todd, could you explain in detail, for us less experienced people,
                  your version of 'treated brewing water' ?

                  Thanks;I am saving your recipe and when I get to the stage of
                  making whisky will have a serious look at it.

                  Regards,

                  The Baker
                • jamesonbeam1
                  ... This might help. http://www.brewingtechniques.com/library/backissues/issue1.3/king.html Vino es Veritas, Jim.
                  Message 8 of 28 , Nov 26, 2007
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                    --- In new_distillers@yahoogroups.com, "gff_stwrt" <gff_stwrt@...>
                    wrote:
                    >
                    > --- In new_distillers@yahoogroups.com, "toddk63" toddk63@ wrote:
                    > >
                    > > Here's the one I use and love the results:
                    > >
                    > > -Heat 7.0 gal. treated brewing water to 172F
                    >
                    > > snip.
                    > >
                    > > Todd K.
                    > >
                    >
                    >
                    > Hi, folks,
                    >
                    > Todd, could you explain in detail, for us less experienced people,
                    > your version of 'treated brewing water' ?
                    >
                    > Thanks;I am saving your recipe and when I get to the stage of
                    > making whisky will have a serious look at it.
                    >
                    > Regards,
                    >
                    > The Baker

                    This might help.

                    http://www.brewingtechniques.com/library/backissues/issue1.3/king.html

                    Vino es Veritas,
                    Jim.
                  • jamesonbeam1
                    BTW, rather then really getting confused but all that stuff, I think its summed up in the first paragraph - A sound general practice is to use soft or
                    Message 9 of 28 , Nov 27, 2007
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                      BTW, rather then really getting confused but all that stuff, I think
                      its summed up in the first paragraph -

                      "A sound general practice is to use soft or distilled water for
                      dilution. Water treatment is most important when mashing, whether
                      all-grain or mash-extract."

                      Least thats the way I've done it for making nice wines and stuff - a
                      nice soft bottled water or distilled water always worked for me...

                      Vino es Veritas and Happy Holidays,
                      Jim.



                      --- In new_distillers@yahoogroups.com, "jamesonbeam1"
                      <jamesonbeam1@...> wrote:
                      >
                      >
                      >
                      > --- In new_distillers@yahoogroups.com, "gff_stwrt" <gff_stwrt@>
                      > wrote:
                      > >
                      > > --- In new_distillers@yahoogroups.com, "toddk63" toddk63@ wrote:
                      > > >
                      > > > Here's the one I use and love the results:
                      > > >
                      > > > -Heat 7.0 gal. treated brewing water to 172F
                      > >
                      > > > snip.
                      > > >
                      > > > Todd K.
                      > > >
                      > >
                      > >
                      > > Hi, folks,
                      > >
                      > > Todd, could you explain in detail, for us less experienced
                      people,
                      > > your version of 'treated brewing water' ?
                      > >
                      > > Thanks;I am saving your recipe and when I get to the stage of
                      > > making whisky will have a serious look at it.
                      > >
                      > > Regards,
                      > >
                      > > The Baker
                      >
                      > This might help.
                      >
                      >
                      http://www.brewingtechniques.com/library/backissues/issue1.3/king.htm
                      l
                      >
                      > Vino es Veritas,
                      > Jim.
                      >
                    • gff_stwrt
                      Thanks, Jim Regards, The Baker ... think ... a
                      Message 10 of 28 , Nov 27, 2007
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                        Thanks, Jim

                        Regards,

                        The Baker




                        --- In new_distillers@yahoogroups.com, "jamesonbeam1"
                        <jamesonbeam1@...> wrote:
                        >
                        > BTW, rather then really getting confused but all that stuff, I
                        think
                        > its summed up in the first paragraph -
                        >
                        > "A sound general practice is to use soft or distilled water for
                        > dilution. Water treatment is most important when mashing, whether
                        > all-grain or mash-extract."
                        >
                        > Least thats the way I've done it for making nice wines and stuff -
                        a
                        > nice soft bottled water or distilled water always worked for me...
                        >
                        > Vino es Veritas and Happy Holidays,
                        > Jim.
                      • toddk63
                        If you have never successfully brewed all-grain beer, you may be setting yourself up for failure in trying this recipe. As in all-grain brewing, your water
                        Message 11 of 28 , Nov 27, 2007
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                          If you have never successfully brewed all-grain beer, you may be
                          setting yourself up for failure in trying this recipe.

                          As in all-grain brewing, your water should be:

                          1) De-chlorinated (carbon filtered or metabisulfite treatment)
                          2) contain adequate calcium ions (~100 ppm) to aid the mash conversion
                          3) and be acidified (5.5 to 6.0 pH) to aid the mash conversion


                          >
                          > Todd, could you explain in detail, for us less experienced people,
                          > your version of 'treated brewing water' ?
                          >
                          >
                        • Louis Lenz
                          Well Tarvus, i gotta say that corn whiskey flour recipe is SWEET, i´ve been trying all kinds of things to get a good conversion, and this is outstanding, i
                          Message 12 of 28 , Nov 29, 2007
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                            Well Tarvus, i gotta say that corn whiskey flour recipe is SWEET, i´ve been trying all kinds of things to get a good conversion, and this is outstanding, i got a 1.070 and hardly any work, and i´m really looking forward to not straining so much, i can´t wait until sunday!!  Thanks, Lou

                            Tarvus <tarvus33991@...> wrote:
                            --- In new_distillers@ yahoogroups. com, "Rob" <robobline@. ..> wrote:
                            >
                            > Hello all,
                            > Would anyone care to share a good corn recipe with me/us? I
                            would
                            > like to make a all corn/malt mash without using suger. I would be
                            > using a 15 gallon boiler. If anyone would like to share a great
                            > recipe, I'm all ears.
                            > Thanks, Rob

                            Hey Rob,

                            I've done a number of pure corn mashes.

                            #1 - the hard way...
                            In the past, I've used 80% cracked corn and 20% 6-row barley malt.
                            Mashing cracked corn (even with barley malt) is a pain. (Same thing
                            if you substitute corn meal for cracked corn.) It's actually a 2
                            step process. You have to add a portion of the barley malt to the
                            corn (about 1/4 of your malt)and mash it prior to boiling it to
                            gelatinize the corn. Add a pint of water per pound of grain at a
                            temp 18F above your planned strike temp. Shoot for a 150F mash temp
                            and mash for at least 1/2 hour. This will only partially convert
                            your corn but will loosen up the corn enough that it won't become a
                            thick viscous lump of cereal when you boil it. (And you have to
                            boil it to gelatinize it).

                            After 1/2 hour of mashing, add another cup per pound of boiling
                            water and ramp up the flame under the kettle until the whole mash is
                            boiling. Boil for an hour or so to totally gelatinize the corn.
                            Add a final cup per pound of COLD water. Allow the whole thing to
                            cool down to about 155F (this will take a LONG time depending on the
                            size of your mash) then add the rest of the barley malt. This will
                            drop the entire mash temp to about 148 - 150F. Stir in the recently
                            added 6 row malt and let it steep. When the whole thing cools down
                            to room temp (hours later), transfer to your fermenter and pitch
                            your yeast( I use a new, 32 gallon plastic garbage can sanitized
                            with bleach and water and thoroughly rinsed.) Don't worry about
                            straining the grain out - just dump it all in the fermenter.
                            Ferment it "on the grain".

                            If you use an electric heating element you'll have to strain the
                            mash before distilling. This is a real pain in the ass. Good
                            luck! If you are lucky enough to be using a propane or natural gas
                            heat source, it is not necessary to strain it - just add the wash to
                            your boiler to distill - grain hulls and all. If distilling "on the
                            grain" do NOT fill the boiler more than 1/2 full of mash! You have
                            to be very careful that the grain in the mash does not swell up and
                            plug the column or lyne arm of your still or you risk explosion from
                            resulting pressure increase in your boiler! (This almost happened
                            to me the first time I over-filled and ran a corn mash in my boiler).

                            #2 - the "easy way"...
                            Buy corn flour from the grocery store (it's easy to find and quite
                            inexpensive. I pay $1.89 US per kilo. They sell it for making corn
                            tortillas). Use a 50% corn flour mash with 50% corn malt, or an 80%
                            corn flour 20% 6-row barley malt mash. No need to boil this mash
                            because the corn flour is already gelatinized from the milling.
                            Mash at 148 - 150F for an hour or two. Cool to room temp and pitch
                            your yeast. Virtually all of the corn flour will convert and you'll
                            just have a very few barley or corn husks in the mash from the
                            malt. No need to strain if you're careful pouring the mash from
                            your fermenter.

                            Use your favorite yeast and favorite distilling technique. Age on
                            oak at 125 proof for a really smooth bourbon-like result!

                            The #1 method is inexpensive but time consuming. The #2 method is a
                            bit more expensive but MUCH easier and a lot less time comsuming.

                            Good luck and let us know how your hooch turns out! :)

                            Tarvus
                            ps - will post separately my techniques for malting, drying and
                            grinding corn.



                            Never miss a thing. Make Yahoo your homepage.

                          • Tarvus
                            ... i´ve been trying all kinds of things to get a good conversion, and this is outstanding, i got a 1.070 and hardly any work, and i´m really looking forward
                            Message 13 of 28 , Nov 29, 2007
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                              --- In new_distillers@yahoogroups.com, Louis Lenz <loulenz2002@...>
                              wrote:
                              >
                              > Well Tarvus, i gotta say that corn whiskey flour recipe is SWEET,
                              i´ve been trying all kinds of things to get a good conversion, and this
                              is outstanding, i got a 1.070 and hardly any work, and i´m really
                              looking forward to not straining so much, i can´t wait until sunday!!
                              Thanks, Lou

                              Hey Lou,

                              Glad to hear the corn flour recipe worked well for you! If you hit a
                              1.07, you got excellent conversion!

                              Be sure to save some backset from your distillation run to slop back
                              into your next mash!

                              Tarvus
                            • toddk63
                              Tarvus, For clarification. Is this corn flour for tortillas have lime in it (Calcium Oxide...not the citrus). The stuff with lime for tortillas we call masa
                              Message 14 of 28 , Nov 30, 2007
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                                Tarvus,

                                For clarification. Is this corn flour for tortillas have lime in it
                                (Calcium Oxide...not the citrus). The stuff with lime for tortillas
                                we call "masa harina". Is this what you are talking about or is it
                                just finely milled corn and nothing else.

                                Thanks,

                                Todd k.

                                --- In new_distillers@yahoogroups.com, "Tarvus" <tarvus33991@...> wrote:
                                >
                                > --- In new_distillers@yahoogroups.com, Louis Lenz <loulenz2002@>
                                > wrote:
                                > >
                                > > Well Tarvus, i gotta say that corn whiskey flour recipe is SWEET,
                                > i´ve been trying all kinds of things to get a good conversion, and this
                                > is outstanding, i got a 1.070 and hardly any work, and i´m really
                                > looking forward to not straining so much, i can´t wait until sunday!!
                                > Thanks, Lou
                                >
                                > Hey Lou,
                                >
                                > Glad to hear the corn flour recipe worked well for you! If you hit a
                                > 1.07, you got excellent conversion!
                                >
                                > Be sure to save some backset from your distillation run to slop back
                                > into your next mash!
                                >
                                > Tarvus
                                >
                              • rye_junkie
                                I was wondering the same thing. You can buy Alabama brand fine ground corn meal/flour that would probably work well also. Mason
                                Message 15 of 28 , Nov 30, 2007
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                                  I was wondering the same thing. You can buy Alabama brand fine ground
                                  corn meal/flour that would probably work well also.

                                  Mason

                                  --- In new_distillers@yahoogroups.com, "toddk63" <toddk63@...> wrote:
                                  >
                                  > Tarvus,
                                  >
                                  > For clarification. Is this corn flour for tortillas have lime in it
                                  > (Calcium Oxide...not the citrus). The stuff with lime for tortillas
                                  > we call "masa harina". Is this what you are talking about or is it
                                  > just finely milled corn and nothing else.
                                  >
                                  > Thanks,
                                • Louis Lenz
                                  I just used the regular finely ground corn and it worked great. Lou rye_junkie wrote: I was wondering the same thing. You can
                                  Message 16 of 28 , Nov 30, 2007
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                                    I just used the regular finely ground corn and it worked great.  Lou

                                    rye_junkie <rye_junkie@...> wrote:
                                    I was wondering the same thing. You can buy Alabama brand fine ground
                                    corn meal/flour that would probably work well also.

                                    Mason

                                    --- In new_distillers@ yahoogroups. com, "toddk63" <toddk63@... > wrote:
                                    >
                                    > Tarvus,
                                    >
                                    > For clarification. Is this corn flour for tortillas have lime in it
                                    > (Calcium Oxide...not the citrus). The stuff with lime for tortillas
                                    > we call "masa harina". Is this what you are talking about or is it
                                    > just finely milled corn and nothing else.
                                    >
                                    > Thanks,



                                    Be a better pen pal. Text or chat with friends inside Yahoo! Mail. See how.

                                  • Tarvus
                                    ... it ... tortillas ... Hey Todd, I just checked the package and it says processed with lime - so I guess that makes it the masa harina you mentioned.
                                    Message 17 of 28 , Dec 2, 2007
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                                      --- In new_distillers@yahoogroups.com, "toddk63" <toddk63@...> wrote:
                                      >
                                      > Tarvus,
                                      >
                                      > For clarification. Is this corn flour for tortillas have lime in
                                      it
                                      > (Calcium Oxide...not the citrus). The stuff with lime for
                                      tortillas
                                      > we call "masa harina". Is this what you are talking about or is it
                                      > just finely milled corn and nothing else.
                                      >
                                      > Thanks,
                                      >
                                      > Todd k.

                                      Hey Todd,

                                      I just checked the package and it says "processed with lime" - so I
                                      guess that makes it the masa harina you mentioned.

                                      regards,
                                      Tar
                                    • toddk63
                                      Hey that s great news! Masa harina is very available and quite cheap here in North Mexico. And you said you just mash it with barley, no pre-boil to
                                      Message 18 of 28 , Dec 3, 2007
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                                        Hey that's great news! Masa harina is very available and quite cheap
                                        here in North Mexico. And you said you just mash it with barley, no
                                        pre-boil to gelatanize?

                                        Todd K.


                                        >
                                        > Hey Todd,
                                        >
                                        > I just checked the package and it says "processed with lime" - so I
                                        > guess that makes it the masa harina you mentioned.
                                        >
                                        > regards,
                                        > Tar
                                        >
                                      • rye_junkie
                                        Yesterday I played around with 2 different store bought corn Flour/Meal products. The first was Tones Brand Yellow corn meal. It was 7 pounds in a plastic
                                        Message 19 of 28 , Dec 3, 2007
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                                          Yesterday I played around with 2 different store bought corn
                                          Flour/Meal products. The first was Tones Brand Yellow corn meal. It
                                          was 7 pounds in a plastic jug at Sams Club for less than $4.00. The
                                          other was some Alabama fine ground corn meal (white corn). This was
                                          more of a flour consistency. For each experiment i used 1 pound in 3
                                          quarts of water.
                                          The water was brought up to almost boiling and the burner then turned
                                          off. I added the Flour/Meal to the water along with 1/4 cup of Malted
                                          barley. This kept the mash thin otherwise you get grits. Once it
                                          cooled to 154F I added another 1/4 cup Malt and did my best to keep it
                                          between 145F and 152F for the next 2 hours. The Iodine test remained
                                          Blue with both versions after 2 hours and I gave up on converting
                                          after this amount of time. I put the washes into 2 separate
                                          containers let them cool and pitched yeast. This morning they were
                                          both fermenting nicely with a healthy looking cap to fold back in. I
                                          do not know what the yield will be ethanol wise but I would think that
                                          at least some of the starches converted for all the bubbling to be
                                          happening. I am going to try these out in my newly fabricated
                                          Erlenmeyer mini still. I will post the yield in a few days for those
                                          that are interested.

                                          Mason
                                        • Tarvus
                                          ... Yep. The milling process breaks the cell walls down so no real need to boil to gelatinize.
                                          Message 20 of 28 , Dec 3, 2007
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                                            --- In new_distillers@yahoogroups.com, "toddk63" <toddk63@...> wrote:
                                            >
                                            > Hey that's great news! Masa harina is very available and quite cheap
                                            > here in North Mexico. And you said you just mash it with barley, no
                                            > pre-boil to gelatanize?
                                            >
                                            > Todd K.

                                            Yep. The milling process breaks the cell walls down so no real need to
                                            boil to gelatinize.
                                          • jhauser88@yahoo.com
                                            Instead of using malt can I use a lot of beano I m out of malt, and have to make more in the time I m going to experiment with beano, please bear with me my
                                            Message 21 of 28 , Dec 3, 2007
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                                              Instead of using malt can I use a lot of beano I'm out of malt, and have to make more in the time I'm going to experiment with beano, please bear with me my computer broke and I'm using my cell phone
                                              Sent via BlackBerry by AT&T

                                              -----Original Message-----
                                              From: "Tarvus" <tarvus33991@...>

                                              Date: Mon, 03 Dec 2007 18:22:46
                                              To:new_distillers@yahoogroups.com
                                              Subject: [new_distillers] Re: Corn Whiskey Recipes


                                              --- In new_distillers@ <mailto:new_distillers%40yahoogroups.com> yahoogroups.com, "toddk63" <toddk63@...> wrote:
                                              >
                                              > Hey that's great news! Masa harina is very available and quite cheap
                                              > here in North Mexico. And you said you just mash it with barley, no
                                              > pre-boil to gelatanize?
                                              >
                                              > Todd K.

                                              Yep. The milling process breaks the cell walls down so no real need to
                                              boil to gelatinize.
                                            • toddk63
                                              ... have to make more in the time I m going to experiment with beano, please bear with me my computer broke and I m using my cell phone ... Short answer
                                              Message 22 of 28 , Dec 3, 2007
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                                                --- In new_distillers@yahoogroups.com, jhauser88@... wrote:
                                                >
                                                > Instead of using malt can I use a lot of beano I'm out of malt, and
                                                have to make more in the time I'm going to experiment with beano,
                                                please bear with me my computer broke and I'm using my cell phone
                                                > Sent via BlackBerry by AT&T
                                                >
                                                >

                                                Short answer ...No.. Beano (glucodiase) works works much slower than
                                                amylase. I would predict if you tried only Beano, you would get lousy
                                                conversion. This is just my educated opinion. I have never tried
                                                this. If your doing this in the name of science and don't mind a
                                                failed experiment...go for it..We would all like to hear your results

                                                Todd K.
                                              • Tarvus
                                                I ve never used Beano so I have no idea if and how it would work with this recipe. ... have to make more in the time I m going to experiment with beano, please
                                                Message 23 of 28 , Dec 3, 2007
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                                                  I've never used Beano so I have no idea if and how it would work with
                                                  this recipe.

                                                  --- In new_distillers@yahoogroups.com, jhauser88@... wrote:
                                                  >
                                                  > Instead of using malt can I use a lot of beano I'm out of malt, and
                                                  have to make more in the time I'm going to experiment with beano,
                                                  please bear with me my computer broke and I'm using my cell phone
                                                  > Sent via BlackBerry by AT&T
                                                  >
                                                  > -----Original Message-----
                                                  > From: "Tarvus" <tarvus33991@...>
                                                  >
                                                  > Date: Mon, 03 Dec 2007 18:22:46
                                                  > To:new_distillers@yahoogroups.com
                                                  > Subject: [new_distillers] Re: Corn Whiskey Recipes
                                                  >
                                                  >
                                                  > --- In new_distillers@ <mailto:new_distillers%40yahoogroups.com>
                                                  yahoogroups.com, "toddk63" <toddk63@> wrote:
                                                  > >
                                                  > > Hey that's great news! Masa harina is very available and quite
                                                  cheap
                                                  > > here in North Mexico. And you said you just mash it with barley,
                                                  no
                                                  > > pre-boil to gelatanize?
                                                  > >
                                                  > > Todd K.
                                                  >
                                                  > Yep. The milling process breaks the cell walls down so no real
                                                  need to
                                                  > boil to gelatinize.
                                                  >
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