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Malting Corn, Drying and Grinding Corn Malt

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  • Tarvus
    This is really quite simple to do. A 10 pound batch is a nice, workable amount to start with. Buy a 50 pound sack of feed corn and measure out 10 pounds
    Message 1 of 8 , Nov 23, 2007
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      This is really quite simple to do. A 10 pound batch is a nice,
      workable amount to start with.

      Buy a 50 pound sack of feed corn and measure out 10 pounds worth.
      Place the 10 pounds of corn in a pillowcase and soak for 8 hours in
      a 5 gallon bucket of tepid water.

      After 8 hours, haul the pillowcase of corn out of the bucket and
      allow to drain. Dump the water from the bucket and put the fully
      drained pillowcase of corn back in the bucket. Let it sit for 8
      hours or so.

      After 8 hours, refill the bucket and soak the pillowcase of corn
      again for 8 hours longer. Drain as before.

      Get a large cookie sheet and cover it with two bathroom towels.
      Dump the corn out of the pillowcase and spread 2 to 3 inches deep on
      the towel covered cookie sheet. Use another large towel to cover
      the top of the corn. (You can fold the towel edges to keep the corn
      from falling off the cookie sheet.) The towels over and under
      absorb moisture, yet keep it available for the sprouting corn.
      Slide the towel-covered cookie sheet of corn into a large plastic
      trash bag to keep the moisture from evaporating. Place the cookie
      sheet in a warm, dark spot. After about 4 days, it will have
      sprouts nearly 2 inches long.

      Empty the sprouted corn in equal parts into 4 pillowcases. Knot the
      pillowcases thoroughly and place in your clothes dryer along with a
      half dozen to so towels. Run on the lowest warm setting your dryer
      allows. You don't want the corn to get over 125F. I guess I'm
      lucky because my dryer is 105F at it's lowest setting. After about
      6 hours of continuous drying, your corn should be thoroughly dried
      out. This will make a LOT of corn dust and you'll have to clean the
      dust filter several times while drying. Expect to get some flack
      from your significant other during this drying process! Not only
      will the drying process dry the corn malt, but it will totally
      remove the sprouts as well!

      You can skip the drying process and use the malt wet if you wish,
      but drying it enables you to store it while you accumulate more from
      your next batch or wait for available time to do your mash.

      Before you mash with your dried corn malt, you will want to crush it
      or grind it. I use a whirly blade type coffee grinder and grind it
      fine - somewhere between corn meal and flour in texture. I burnt up
      two cheapo coffee grinders before spending 30 bucks and getting a
      200watt "Kitchenaid" coffee grinder. It'll do 4 ounces per grind in
      about 15 seconds and at that rate, it doesn't take long at all to
      grind up 10 pounds of grain. One-gallon ziplock storage bags make a
      convenient holder for up to 5 pounds plus of crushed malt.

      The malted corn doesn't have the diastatic power of 6-row barley
      malt, but a 50/50 mix of homemade corn malt and store bought corn
      flour will convert nicely (see my previous post). AND you can claim
      100% pure corn if you use it instead of 6-row in your mash recipe!

      Happy brewing and distilling!
      Tarvus
    • Chuck
      Fantastic! Thanks Tarvus ...
      Message 2 of 8 , May 25 10:44 AM
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        Fantastic! Thanks Tarvus






        --- In new_distillers@yahoogroups.com, "Tarvus" <tarvus33991@...> wrote:
        >
        > This is really quite simple to do. A 10 pound batch is a nice,
        > workable amount to start with.
        >
        > Buy a 50 pound sack of feed corn and measure out 10 pounds worth.
        > Place the 10 pounds

        <snipped for brevity>

        > Happy brewing and distilling!
        > Tarvus
        >
      • gravelier007
        Seems like a tremendous amount of work. I grind the field corn, and then bring to a rolling boil about 2 quarts of water per pound of ground corn. After a
        Message 3 of 8 , May 28 7:47 PM
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          Seems like a tremendous amount of work.

          I grind the field corn, and then bring to a rolling boil about 2 quarts of water per pound of ground corn. After a good boil, I turn off the heat, and stir in the ground corn. The temp drops to about 180 F. I let it set overnight and it is about 120F in the morning and like goo, thick gravey with corn starch. I then use about a tsp of Alpha Amylase from Brewhaus.Com per 2 pounds of corn. This is probably a little heavy on the alpha, but it works good. In about 5 minutes, the starch is converted to sugar and ready to hit with yeast when cool.

          The boiling water takes care of any wild yeasts that may sour the mash, and the long soak time takes care of fully geletinizing the starch in the corn. I don't usually do a 100% corn mash. I like to add malted barley, wheat, rye. Depend on the mood at the time.

          If you have ever really looked at what you get with the field corn, you will see a lot of dirt. Also, with the sugars and starch in the corn, it is really ready for mold. So, don't skip the boil. You really need the heat to kill off all the undesireables.

          G.
        • Chuck
          Have you ever followed the Alpha Amylase with Gluco Amylase? Is this not an important second step? I have malted 10 lb. corn which got a considerable amount of
          Message 4 of 8 , Jun 12, 2013
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            Have you ever followed the Alpha Amylase with Gluco Amylase? Is this not an important second step? I have malted 10 lb. corn which got a considerable amount of mold in the process. Do I ignore the mold and boil it anyway, or how can I prevent the mold from happening in the first place?

            --- In new_distillers@yahoogroups.com, "gravelier007" <bhoren@...> wrote:
            >
            > Seems like a tremendous amount of work.
            >
            > I grind the field corn, and then bring to a rolling boil about 2 quarts of water per pound of ground corn. After a good boil, I turn off the heat, and stir in the ground corn. The temp drops to about 180 F. I let it set overnight and it is about 120F in the morning and like goo, thick gravey with corn starch. I then use about a tsp of Alpha Amylase from Brewhaus.Com per 2 pounds of corn. This is probably a little heavy on the alpha, but it works good. In about 5 minutes, the starch is converted to sugar and ready to hit with yeast when cool.
            >
            > The boiling water takes care of any wild yeasts that may sour the mash, and the long soak time takes care of fully geletinizing the starch in the corn. I don't usually do a 100% corn mash. I like to add malted barley, wheat, rye. Depend on the mood at the time.
            >
            > If you have ever really looked at what you get with the field corn, you will see a lot of dirt. Also, with the sugars and starch in the corn, it is really ready for mold. So, don't skip the boil. You really need the heat to kill off all the undesireables.
            >
            > G.
            >
          • gravelier007
            ... What color is the mold? If it is blue/green I think it s really bad. This is from my neighbor farmer who throws away large amounts of corn silage if it
            Message 5 of 8 , Jun 13, 2013
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              --- In new_distillers@yahoogroups.com, "Chuck" <warnerphoto@...> wrote:
              >
              > Have you ever followed the Alpha Amylase with Gluco Amylase? Is this not an important second step? I have malted 10 lb. corn which got a considerable amount of mold in the process. Do I ignore the mold and boil it anyway, or how can I prevent the mold from happening in the first place?
              >
              What color is the mold? If it is blue/green I think it's really bad. This is from my neighbor farmer who throws away large amounts of corn silage if it has any blue green mold on it. Makes the cows sick. If it is white, it may actually be wild yeast. This why I mash the ground corn and then use alpha amylase (AA) to convert starch to sugar. See my procedure above.

              I have some gluco, but have not used it as yet. I presently have my fermenters tied up with beer and rum wash. I have had my corn wash ferment down to less than 1.000 while not using gluco, so I am not sure that I really need it in the way that I do my mash. Also, gluco works best at about pH 5 and is designed to work on dextrins. I have heard that using back set as part of the mash will depress the pH. But I am not sure how that will effect the working of the AA. Also, although GA works best at pH 5, will it work slower at higher pH? Also, don't know. All these questions

              Good luck, enjoy

              G.
            • Chuck
              The mold is black. I have only tried to malt twice, and I got black mold both times. Is there a way to prevent it or does it come with the territory?
              Message 6 of 8 , Jun 14, 2013
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                The mold is black. I have only tried to malt twice, and I got black mold both times. Is there a way to prevent it or does it come with the territory?


                > >
                > > Have you ever followed the Alpha Amylase with Gluco Amylase? Is this not an important second step? I have malted 10 lb. corn which got a considerable amount of mold in the process. Do I ignore the mold and boil it anyway, or how can I prevent the mold from happening in the first place?
                > >
                > What color is the mold? If it is blue/green I think it's really bad.... (trimmed)
              • gravelier007
                Hey Chuck The person who started this thread is Tarvus33991. He is the one with experience in malting corn. I would try to send him a message and ask your
                Message 7 of 8 , Jun 14, 2013
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                  Hey Chuck

                  The person who started this thread is Tarvus33991. He is the one with experience in malting corn. I would try to send him a message and ask your question directly. My thought is that any mold is bad mold. But I am not the expert. I would rather grind the corn, cook it to sterilize and gelatinize the starch. And then use enzyme to convert the starch to sugar. Your way just seems like too much work. But who am I to judge.

                  Hope you get your answers. Good luck

                  G.

                  --- In new_distillers@yahoogroups.com, "Chuck" <warnerphoto@...> wrote:
                  >
                  > The mold is black.
                • suborbital@rocketmail.com
                  Hi Chuck, I ve managed to make 2 lb batches of corn malt and used that to convert 10 lb of corn (2 lb malt corn + 8 lb corn). Take 2 lb of the corn and immerse
                  Message 8 of 8 , Jun 18, 2013
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                    Hi Chuck,

                    I've managed to make 2 lb batches of corn malt and used that to convert 10 lb of corn (2 lb malt corn + 8 lb corn).

                    Take 2 lb of the corn and immerse in enough warm water to cover by a couple inches. Let stand for 12 hours. Drain, rinse and re-immerse. Repeat twice more (total of 36 hours). Drain the corn and dump it into a malt roller. It looks like this << http://youtu.be/_-41wQHHi0o >> scaled down to a five gallon bucket. You'll need a timer to start and stop it -- mine runs for 1 minute every 72 minutes. You should see chits within a day and roots equal to the kernel length in 5 to 7 days depending on temperature and humidity. Eventually the rootlets will dry up and turn black if you leave them long enough. Grind with a blender just before you use it.

                    HTH

                    --- In new_distillers@yahoogroups.com, "gravelier007" <bhoren@...> wrote:
                    >
                    > Hey Chuck
                    >
                    > The person who started this thread is Tarvus33991. He is the one with experience in malting corn. I would try to send him a message and ask your question directly. My thought is that any mold is bad mold. But I am not the expert. I would rather grind the corn, cook it to sterilize and gelatinize the starch. And then use enzyme to convert the starch to sugar. Your way just seems like too much work. But who am I to judge.
                    >
                    > Hope you get your answers. Good luck
                    >
                    > G.
                    >
                    > --- In new_distillers@yahoogroups.com, "Chuck" <warnerphoto@> wrote:
                    > >
                    > > The mold is black.
                    >
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