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Malting Barley

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  • George & Lola Wesel
    Hi Everybody I would appreciate it if someone could tell me if I would need to dry my barley after it has sprouted. Could it be ground up wet because I have
    Message 1 of 11 , Jan 21, 2002
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      Hi Everybody

      I would appreciate it if someone could tell me if I would need to dry my
      barley after it has sprouted. Could it be ground up wet because I have
      no need to store it. Would dry be better or about the same. I've heard
      that wet has more amylase enzyme in it.

      Thanks
      George
    • ups474@aol.com
      yes, malt can be used undried (the big guys call it green malt )- it s a pain to get it to grind when it s wet, though. It will have a higher enzymic
      Message 2 of 11 , Jan 21, 2002
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        yes, malt can be used undried (the big guys call it "green malt")- it's a
        pain to get it to grind when it's wet, though. It will have a higher enzymic
        activity- but not noticably. The real problem is that green malt (if you are
        making a malt whiskey) can give a funny flavor to the spirit. If the wet
        malt is only used for it's enzymic ability (ie. Bourbon) then it won't make a
        difference - use it wet in that case.
      • Stevensgang@webtv.net
        George! Go ahead and use it wet . Won t hurt nothing. Steve Hi Everybody I would appreciate it if someone could tell me if I would need to dry my
        Message 3 of 11 , Jan 21, 2002
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          George! Go ahead and use it wet . Won't hurt nothing. Steve
        • John Vandermeulen
          Hello, how does rolled barley differ from flaked barley as mentioned by Ian Smiley in his book? John V
          Message 4 of 11 , Jan 22, 2002
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            Hello,
            how does 'rolled' barley differ from 'flaked' barley as mentioned by Ian Smiley
            in his book?
            John V

            Tim Walters wrote:

            > Hi All,
            >
            > Stevensgang@... wrote:
            > > I would appreciate it if someone could tell me if I would need to dry my
            > > barley after it has sprouted. Could it be ground up wet...
            >
            > Well probably, BUT -
            >
            > When malted barley is mashed, the hulls constitute a filter bed.
            > This filter bed eliminates most of the hull chunks that would get
            > into the wort and cause astringency. That is why that malted
            > barley should be *CRUSHED*, not ground. The ideal situation
            > is to put the malt through a roller mill (make one or buy one for
            > US $70-$100). The roller mill squeezes the kernels between 2
            > rollers (or a roller and a plate), and "pops" the kernel. Ideally
            > leaving 2 halves of the grain kernel. If the grain is ground, and
            > the hulls shredded, you will have an astringent wort, and your
            > extraction efficiency will suffer (less alcohol for the same amount
            > of barley).
            >
            > My $.02 (US)
            > ;-)
            > Tim
            >
            >
            > To unsubscribe from this group, send an email to:
            > new_distillers-unsubscribe@onelist.com
            >
            >
            >
            > Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to http://docs.yahoo.com/info/terms/
          • George & Lola Wesel
            Can I grind it by running it through a meat grinder? George
            Message 5 of 11 , Jan 22, 2002
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              Can I grind it by running it through a meat grinder?

              George





              ups474@... wrote:

              > yes, malt can be used undried (the big guys call it "green malt")- it's a
              > pain to get it to grind when it's wet, though. It will have a higher
              > enzymic
              > activity- but not noticably. The real problem is that green malt (if you
              > are
              > making a malt whiskey) can give a funny flavor to the spirit. If the wet
              > malt is only used for it's enzymic ability (ie. Bourbon) then it won't
              > make a
              > difference - use it wet in that case.
              >
              > To unsubscribe from this group, send an email to:
              > new_distillers-unsubscribe@onelist.com
              >
              >
              >
              > Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to the Yahoo! Terms of Service
              > <http://docs.yahoo.com/info/terms/>.
            • ups474@aol.com
              There is no appreciable difference between the two.
              Message 6 of 11 , Jan 22, 2002
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                There is no appreciable difference between the two.
              • Peers Cawley
                Hi all For the last few months, I have been malting my own barley and using it green - It is impossible to get any form of malt here. I d like to try out some
                Message 7 of 11 , Jun 1, 2009
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                  Hi all

                  For the last few months, I have been malting my own barley and using it green - It is impossible to get any form of malt here.

                  I'd like to try out some recipes that use roasted malt from Light through to chocolate. Does anyone know or can point me in the right direction where I can find the roasting times and temperatures that will take green malt through it's various stages.

                  Many thanks,

                  Cheers from Peers
                • Harry
                  ... Lots of facts & figures here. http://www.bairds-malt.co.uk/index.html Maybe ask them & post the reply here? Slainte! regards Harry
                  Message 8 of 11 , Jun 1, 2009
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                    --- In new_distillers@yahoogroups.com, "Peers Cawley" <peers_c@...> wrote:
                    >
                    > Hi all
                    >
                    > For the last few months, I have been malting my own barley and using it green - It is impossible to get any form of malt here.
                    >
                    > I'd like to try out some recipes that use roasted malt from Light through to chocolate. Does anyone know or can point me in the right direction where I can find the roasting times and temperatures that will take green malt through it's various stages.
                    >
                    > Many thanks,
                    >
                    > Cheers from Peers
                    >


                    Lots of facts & figures here.
                    http://www.bairds-malt.co.uk/index.html

                    Maybe ask them & post the reply here?


                    Slainte!
                    regards Harry
                  • Peers Cawley
                    Thanks Harry, Gives me some idea over temperatures but as regards time - seems like you need to be able to measure the original humidity of your grain. Up till
                    Message 9 of 11 , Jun 1, 2009
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                      Thanks Harry,

                       

                      Gives me some idea over temperatures but as regards time – seems like you need to be able to measure the original humidity of your grain. Up till now I have soaked the barley for six hours and placed it in my biosnakky unit. (I’ll explain that part later) for three days. Then just placed the sprouted grains under a fan on a tray covered with Kleenex on my patio to dry out. Knocked off the shoots and worked from there – Got real problems with temperature, even with the A/C on the barley is generating it’s own heat up to 28 degrees

                       

                      From: new_distillers@yahoogroups.com [mailto:new_distillers@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of Harry
                      Sent: 01 June 2009 18:22
                      To: new_distillers@yahoogroups.com
                      Subject: [new_distillers] Re: Malting Barley

                       




                      --- In new_distillers@yahoogroups.com, "Peers Cawley" <peers_c@...> wrote:

                      >
                      > Hi all
                      >
                      > For the last few months, I have been malting my own barley and using it
                      green - It is impossible to get any form of malt here.
                      >
                      > I'd like to try out some recipes that use roasted malt from Light through
                      to chocolate. Does anyone know or can point me in the right direction where I can find the roasting times and temperatures that will take green malt through it's various stages.
                      >
                      > Many thanks,
                      >
                      > Cheers from Peers
                      >

                      Lots of facts & figures here.
                      http://www.bairds-malt.co.uk/index.html

                      Maybe ask them & post the reply here?

                      Slainte!
                      regards Harry

                    • made_it_myself
                      Hi group, I ve just been given 80 pounds of malting barley by a local farmer, and I am now wondering what to do with it! I am sure I read something about using
                      Message 10 of 11 , Aug 28 12:21 PM
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                        Hi group,
                        I've just been given 80 pounds of malting barley by a local farmer, and I am now
                        wondering what to do with it!
                        I am sure I read something about using enzymes instead of the malting process
                        (please point me towards the thread I can't find it) and I am quite keen to try
                        it out, any information would be welcome.
                        P.S.
                        Can I get these enzymes in the UK or do I have to import them?
                        P.P.S
                        If you have tried this can you tell me what the "beer" tastes like?
                      • jamesonbeam1
                        Hi Made, Nothing better then a nice single malt wiskey (cept mabe our white dawg, corn shine likker we make in these parts [;)] .) If your not going to malt
                        Message 11 of 11 , Aug 28 2:18 PM
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                          Hi Made,

                          Nothing better then a nice single malt wiskey (cept mabe our white dawg, corn shine likker we make in these parts ;).)  If your not going to malt the barley, then you can use alpha and beta amylase enzymes to convert the starches to sugars, or use the UJSSM method and use the barley instead of corn...  If you really want to be a purist, you could do your own malted barley (bit messy) - its in Tony's site: http://www.homedistiller.org/wash-grain.htm#malting

                          But your interest in using the enzymes is IMHO, probably  the best and easiest  way to go.  We have had several threads on using these enzymes, the ones Mason and other use are the BA\GA-100 enzymes from Mile High Distillers located here in the USA. (Denver, CO me thinks:).  http://www.milehidistilling.com/additives_s/26.htm 

                          Some of the threads we have discussed these enzymes can be found at: http://groups.yahoo.com/group/new_distillers/msearch?query=BA+100+MASON&charset=windows-1252

                          Good Luck.

                          Vino es Veritas,

                          Jim aka Waldo  (see below for desc. of enzymes)

                          Alpha-Amylase Enzyme - 1 Pound
                          Alpha-Amylase Enzyme - 1 Pound
                          Our Price: $14.99

                          BA-100 is a bacterial alpha-amylse enzyme. It is a food-grade enzyme product produced by fermentation of a non-GMO strain of Bacillus. This enzyme is Kosher-certified, not-synthetic and can be used in the production of certified-organic foods. BA-100, endo-amylase, randomly hydrolyzes 1.4-alpha-glucosidic bonds in starch. The prolonged action of BA-100 reduces the viscosity of gelatinized starch and produces large amounts of low molecular weight oligosaccharides. This process will turn the starch into long chain sugars but unfortunately yeast cannot utilize this sugar yet.

                          BA-100 and GA-100 enzymes are the exact same enzymes used by both the beverage alcohol and fuel alcohol industries. These are very concentrated and just 1/10 pound of each of these enzymes will break down 100 pounds of grain or starch into fermentable glucose.

                          Please store these enzymes refrigerated in zip lock bags.
                          Gluco-Amylase Enzyme - 1 Pound
                          Gluco-Amylase Enzyme - 1 Pound
                          Our Price: $14.99

                          GA-100 is a Glucoamylase enzyme produced by controlled fermentation of a non-GMO strain of Rhizopus; (much stronger action than glucoamylase produced by Aspergillus Niger) this enzyme is food-grade, Kosher-certified, Non-synthetic and can be used to produce certified-organic beverages. GA-100, an exo-alpha-amylase, hydrolyses 1.4 alpha-glucosidic bonds of liquefied starch. The prolonged action of GA-100 produces large amounts of glucose. This means that this process converts all the long chain sugars produced by BA-100 into short chain sugars that the yeast will love.

                          BA-100 and GA-100 enzymes are the exact same enzymes used by both the beverage alcohol and fuel alcohol industries. These are very concentrated and just 1/10 pound of each of these enzymes will break down 100 pounds of grain or starch into fermentable glucose.

                          Please store these enzymes refrigerated in zip lock bags.

                           

                           


                          --- In new_distillers@yahoogroups.com, "made_it_myself" <doctorlawrencebrown@...> wrote:
                          >
                          > Hi group,
                          > I've just been given 80 pounds of malting barley by a local farmer, and I am now
                          > wondering what to do with it!
                          > I am sure I read something about using enzymes instead of the malting process
                          > (please point me towards the thread I can't find it) and I am quite keen to try
                          > it out, any information would be welcome.
                          > P.S.
                          > Can I get these enzymes in the UK or do I have to import them?
                          > P.P.S
                          > If you have tried this can you tell me what the "beer" tastes like?
                          >

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