Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.
 

ADMIN MSG: Caution (was) Re: Globe and Mail article on distilling?

Expand Messages
  • tyler_97355
    Alcohol is one of the highest taxed commodities in the United states. This is one of the reasons why the prohibition didn t last long here. The US government
    Message 1 of 13 , Jun 8, 2007
      Alcohol is one of the highest taxed commodities in the United states.
      This is one of the reasons why the prohibition didn't last long here.
      The US government lost about $500 million per year in lost revenue.
      This is equivalent to about $5,642,936,240.01 in 2006. However, I'm
      sure that more people drink now than they do then. However, if the US
      legalized home distillation, I only see a very small dent in the $8.2
      billion they are making now. Home brewing and wimemaking are already
      legal, and yet most people who drink, do not make their own. I make my
      own liquor, but that doesn't mean I don't run down to the bottle shop
      every now and then to pick up a bottle of Bacardi.

      Will home distillation every become legal in the United States? I
      don't see the US government giving up a dime of the over $8 billion
      they make.

      Just my two cents worth.

      -Tyler



      --- In new_distillers@yahoogroups.com, "waljaco" <waljaco@...> wrote:
      >
      > There is tax on jam, but home jam making is legal. In the 19th century
      > excise on alcohol provided 40% of the total tax income in Britain. It
      > is less than a tenth of that now. Less in the E.U. Legalizing it in
      > New Zealand and Ukraine has not bankrupted them!
      > wal
      > --- In new_distillers@yahoogroups.com, "Jan Wouter Wouter"
      > <janwouter.mailgroups@> wrote:
      > >
      > > I don't know how the situation is in other countries, but in the
      > > Netherlands there is a lot of tax on alcoholic beverages and also in a
      > > lot of other European countries. That is the mean reason why home
      > > distilling is illegal.
      > > Home distilling is actually a tax offence.
      > >
      > > Jan Wouter
      > >
      >
    • Gary Boyco
      There is tax on jam, but home jam making is legal. In the 19th century excise on alcohol provided 40% of the total tax income in Britain. It is less than a
      Message 2 of 13 , Jun 8, 2007
        "There is tax on jam, but home jam making is legal. In the 19th century
        excise on alcohol provided 40% of the total tax income in Britain. It
        is less than a tenth of that now. Less in the E.U. Legalizing it in
        New Zealand and Ukraine has not bankrupted them!"

         
        Well put Wal. This post points out another reason these laws are archaic and are slowly reforming around the world.
         
        Gary in Canada


        Ready for the edge of your seat? Check out tonight's top picks on Yahoo! TV.
      • greg tufts
        This individual is concerned with distillation of alcohol in Canada which at this time is illegal. Try this link and you will find proof of this, refered to as
        Message 3 of 13 , Jun 8, 2007
          This individual is concerned with distillation of
          alcohol in Canada which at this time is illegal.
          Try this link and you will find proof of this,
          refered to as the Canada excise act.

          http://tinyurl.com/2ojygm

          This is a weighty document which states
          that you need a license to have anything to do
          with distillation.
          cheers
          greg


          Be smarter than spam. See how smart SpamGuard is at giving junk email the boot with the All-new Yahoo! Mail at http://mrd.mail.yahoo.com/try_beta?.intl=ca
        • Andrew Bugal
          Australia hits you twice when you buy a bottle of booze - once with a wine Tax and then with GST (Goods and services tax) on the total. Went into the bottle
          Message 4 of 13 , Jun 8, 2007
            Australia hits you twice when you buy a bottle of booze - once with a "wine Tax" and then with GST (Goods and services tax) on the total.
             
            Went into the bottle shop the other day to pick up a few bottles of wine and couldn't help but notice that a bottle of simple Teachers scotch was $31.
             
            Nuff said?
             
            Bwyze

            Gary Boyco <fly_boy_bc@...> wrote:
            "There is tax on jam, but home jam making is legal. In the 19th century
            excise on alcohol provided 40% of the total tax income in Britain. It
            is less than a tenth of that now. Less in the E.U. Legalizing it in
            New Zealand and Ukraine has not bankrupted them!"

             
            Well put Wal. This post points out another reason these laws are archaic and are slowly reforming around the world.
             
            Gary in Canada

            Ready for the edge of your seat? Check out tonight's top picks on Yahoo! TV.


            How would you spend $50,000 to create a more sustainable environment in Australia? Go to Yahoo!7 Answers and share your idea.

          Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.