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Re: cleaning

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  • sgd2945
    Caustic soda is Sodium Hydroxide and is a very corrosive alkali soluble in water (gets very hot when added to water - must NEVER add water to caustic soda due
    Message 1 of 15 , Jun 4, 2007
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      Caustic soda is Sodium Hydroxide and is a very corrosive alkali
      soluble in water (gets very hot when added to water - must NEVER add
      water to caustic soda due to the violent chemical reaction which will
      splash the corrosive substance over a wide area) and should not be
      confused with Washing soda (Sodium Carbonate), a highly soluble, yet
      highly alkaline product.

      Stephen
      Canberra, Australia


      In new_distillers@yahoogroups.com, "pint_o_shine" <pintoshine@...>
      wrote:
      >
      > -->
      > > Soak all parts in hot caustic soda solution for an hour. This
      > In the USA this can be purchased under the name Arm and Hammer Washing
      > Soda. It is also called sodium carbonate and can usually be purchased
      > as "PH UP" in the pool section. Check the ingredients for sodium
      > carbonate.
      >
    • Harry
      ... will ... That is correct. In the US it is called LYE. Make up the solution according to the directions on the container. Never add water to straight
      Message 2 of 15 , Jun 5, 2007
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        --- In new_distillers@yahoogroups.com, "sgd2945" <sgd@...> wrote:
        >
        > Caustic soda is Sodium Hydroxide and is a very corrosive alkali
        > soluble in water (gets very hot when added to water - must NEVER add
        > water to caustic soda due to the violent chemical reaction which
        will
        > splash the corrosive substance over a wide area) and should not be
        > confused with Washing soda (Sodium Carbonate), a highly soluble, yet
        > highly alkaline product.
        >
        > Stephen
        > Canberra, Australia



        That is correct. In the US it is called LYE. Make up the solution
        according to the directions on the container.

        Never add water to straight caustic, just as you never add water to
        straight acid. Do it the other way around ie. add the powder (or
        liquid) to the measured amount of water. This is standard procedure.

        More about caustic and its uses here (including as a brewing equipment
        cleaner)...
        http://www.chemistrystore.com/Caustic_Soda.htm

        More about copper welding/brazing here...
        http://brazing.com/techguide/procedures/copper_welding.asp


        Slainte!
        regards Harry
      • mstehelin
        I Have been getting a blue haze from my wine runs. Could this be from not cleaning? The wash is the left over dregs from wine making. I can t see it been
        Message 3 of 15 , Jun 5, 2007
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          I Have been getting a blue haze from my wine runs. Could this be from
          not cleaning? The wash is the left over dregs from wine making. I
          can't see it been overly basic.


          --- In new_distillers@yahoogroups.com, "Harry" <gnikomson2000@...> wrote:
          >
          > --- In new_distillers@yahoogroups.com, "sgd2945" <sgd@> wrote:
          > >
          > > Caustic soda is Sodium Hydroxide and is a very corrosive alkali
          > > soluble in water (gets very hot when added to water - must NEVER add
          > > water to caustic soda due to the violent chemical reaction which
          > will
          > > splash the corrosive substance over a wide area) and should not be
          > > confused with Washing soda (Sodium Carbonate), a highly soluble, yet
          > > highly alkaline product.
          > >
          > > Stephen
          > > Canberra, Australia
          >
          >
          >
          > That is correct. In the US it is called LYE. Make up the solution
          > according to the directions on the container.
          >
          > Never add water to straight caustic, just as you never add water to
          > straight acid. Do it the other way around ie. add the powder (or
          > liquid) to the measured amount of water. This is standard procedure.
          >
          > More about caustic and its uses here (including as a brewing equipment
          > cleaner)...
          > http://www.chemistrystore.com/Caustic_Soda.htm
          >
          > More about copper welding/brazing here...
          > http://brazing.com/techguide/procedures/copper_welding.asp
          >
          >
          > Slainte!
          > regards Harry
          >
        • Harry
          ... Acids in contact with copper will give blue tinges, just not as pronounced or as quick as bases. Also be aware that copper sulphate can form in crystals
          Message 4 of 15 , Jun 5, 2007
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            --- In new_distillers@yahoogroups.com, "mstehelin" <mstehelin@...>
            wrote:
            >
            > I Have been getting a blue haze from my wine runs. Could this be from
            > not cleaning? The wash is the left over dregs from wine making. I
            > can't see it been overly basic.



            Acids in contact with copper will give blue tinges, just not as
            pronounced or as quick as bases. Also be aware that copper sulphate
            can form in crystals and lodge in the condenser works & packing when
            the still is left idle for any length of time. Then the next run
            dissolves the crystals into your booze. That's why you should hose
            out the still and let it air-dry before storage.


            Slainte!
            regards Harry
          • mstehelin
            If I add Baking Soda to the distilled product and re-distill that should take care of the copper sulfate problem right?
            Message 5 of 15 , Jun 6, 2007
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              If I add Baking Soda to the distilled product and re-distill that
              should take care of the copper sulfate problem right?


              --- In new_distillers@yahoogroups.com, "Harry" <gnikomson2000@...> wrote:
              >
              > --- In new_distillers@yahoogroups.com, "mstehelin" <mstehelin@>
              > wrote:
              > >
              > > I Have been getting a blue haze from my wine runs. Could this be from
              > > not cleaning? The wash is the left over dregs from wine making. I
              > > can't see it been overly basic.
              >
              >
              >
              > Acids in contact with copper will give blue tinges, just not as
              > pronounced or as quick as bases. Also be aware that copper sulphate
              > can form in crystals and lodge in the condenser works & packing when
              > the still is left idle for any length of time. Then the next run
              > dissolves the crystals into your booze. That's why you should hose
              > out the still and let it air-dry before storage.
              >
              >
              > Slainte!
              > regards Harry
              >
            • Harry
              ... Baking soda is not a cure all or magic bullet. It is useful for cleaning up a smelly faulty run with dissolved gases (off-smells) in it. Remember it
              Message 6 of 15 , Jun 6, 2007
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                --- In new_distillers@yahoogroups.com, "mstehelin" <mstehelin@...>
                wrote:
                >
                > If I add Baking Soda to the distilled product and re-distill that
                > should take care of the copper sulfate problem right?



                Baking soda is not a 'cure all' or magic bullet. It is useful for
                cleaning up a smelly faulty run with dissolved gases (off-smells) in
                it. Remember it raises pH, which may compound your problem if your
                faulty product is already neutral or slightly alkaline and your
                still has copper in it. You'd be better off using a bit of citric
                acid to set the pH slightly acidic, something below 7 like about 6.5
                to 6.

                Then redistil it, AFTER cleaning all your equipment. See msg
                http://groups.yahoo.com/group/new_distillers/message/23979

                An ounce of fault prevention is worth a pound of cure.


                Slainte!
                regards Harry
              • mstehelin
                Hmmmm. I put baking soda in all stripped alcohol as a standard practice. I noticed that when the booze is stripped it comes out clear. It looks good. BUT When
                Message 7 of 15 , Jun 8, 2007
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                  Hmmmm. I put baking soda in all stripped alcohol as a standard
                  practice. I noticed that when the booze is stripped it comes out
                  clear. It looks good. BUT When I add a couple of spoons of Baking soda
                  it develops a blue haze that eventually settles into blue crystals.
                  Could this be any copper ions in the liquid precipitating out?
                  M.


                  --- In new_distillers@yahoogroups.com, "Harry" <gnikomson2000@...> wrote:
                  >
                  > --- In new_distillers@yahoogroups.com, "mstehelin" <mstehelin@>
                  > wrote:
                  > >
                  > > If I add Baking Soda to the distilled product and re-distill that
                  > > should take care of the copper sulfate problem right?
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  > Baking soda is not a 'cure all' or magic bullet. It is useful for
                  > cleaning up a smelly faulty run with dissolved gases (off-smells) in
                  > it. Remember it raises pH, which may compound your problem if your
                  > faulty product is already neutral or slightly alkaline and your
                  > still has copper in it. You'd be better off using a bit of citric
                  > acid to set the pH slightly acidic, something below 7 like about 6.5
                  > to 6.
                  >
                  > Then redistil it, AFTER cleaning all your equipment. See msg
                  > http://groups.yahoo.com/group/new_distillers/message/23979
                  >
                  > An ounce of fault prevention is worth a pound of cure.
                  >
                  >
                  > Slainte!
                  > regards Harry
                  >
                • oz_distiller
                  I know it s an old thread....but I clean my gear with the hot slop, just throw all your bits in your boiler when you ve finished the run. Don t forget to take
                  Message 8 of 15 , Jun 27, 2007
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                    I know it's an old thread....but I clean my gear with the hot slop,
                    just throw all your bits in your boiler when you've finished the run.
                    Don't forget to take your backins first though!



                    AKA as CoopsOz from HD.org
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