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Re: Old wash - strip it or dump it?

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  • Harry
    ... but ... has ... start ... Essentially what you have is a wine that s been doing a secondary fermentation on the lees for 8 months. Autolysed yeast does
    Message 1 of 2 , May 30, 2007
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      --- In new_distillers@yahoogroups.com, "richardt2005"
      <richardt2005@...> wrote:
      >
      > I finished my first still and my first batch of wash last October,
      but
      > life cropped up and it's sat untouched since then.
      >
      > The still is a 20 gal. stainless barrel, with a 4'x2" reflux column
      > packed with copper scrubbers. It's topped with a 12"x1.5" ID copper
      > liebig condenser. The product condenser is a 3'x1" id liebig. It
      has
      > 2 2kw immersion heaters floating on the surface of the wash (the
      > barrel was so expensive I didn't want to drill holes in it.)
      >
      > The wash is 12 gallons of 20% ABV, from RO water, table sugar and a
      > turbo yeast.
      >
      > Like I said, the wash has been sitting in plastic buckets with
      > airlocks in my garage for 8 months. Should I put it through a fast
      > stripping run, then clean it up with a slow run, or chuck it and
      start
      > over?
      >


      Essentially what you have is a wine that's been doing a secondary
      fermentation on the lees for 8 months. Autolysed yeast does funny
      things to wines. That's why they are racked off the lees for the
      secondary.

      1. Can you guarantee that the airlocks have never breached? I find
      it hard to believe that the water in the trap didn't evaporate in
      that time. Any air contact will certainly let infection in.

      2. Once you open it...
      - Look at it. It should look like clear, slightly amber table wine
      or apple juice. If it looks any other way, eg. thick, or jellied or
      has strands in it, mold, coloured growth, whatever, then it's
      infected.
      - Smell it. If it smells like vinegar, or acetone (nail polish
      remover), then it's useless. There's little or no alcohol left.
      - Taste it (the final test). It should taste like a very dry dinner
      wine. Anything else means it's no good.

      Personally, I'd toss it. I wouldn't risk my health for the sake of
      a few dollars and a week or two fermenting time.


      Slainte!
      regards Harry
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