Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

Pectin enzyme

Expand Messages
  • Miroslava
    Hello people! Ive got a worry about breaking down the pectin of fruit (mangoes, pinapples). I live in tropical paradise, meaning, beach: no roads, no big
    Message 1 of 9 , May 4 4:22 PM
    • 0 Attachment
      Hello people!

      Ive got a worry about breaking down the pectin of fruit (mangoes,
      pinapples). I live in tropical paradise, meaning, beach: no roads,
      no big supermarkets, no fancy stores.
      I have settled for bakers yeast, but what to do with this enzyme? I
      worry coz the site says the pectine, unbroken , will produce more
      methanol and -or other funky undesirable by-products.
      Bush is so thick, gotta make my own booze.
      help!
    • Harry
      ... (mangoes, ... roads, ... I ... There s not enough methanol produced in these small batches to do you any real harm. Read the archives. But of course, you
      Message 2 of 9 , May 4 5:26 PM
      • 0 Attachment
        --- In new_distillers@yahoogroups.com, "Miroslava" <Mrin97@...>
        wrote:
        >
        > Hello people!
        >
        > Ive got a worry about breaking down the pectin of fruit
        (mangoes,
        > pinapples). I live in tropical paradise, meaning, beach: no
        roads,
        > no big supermarkets, no fancy stores.
        > I have settled for bakers yeast, but what to do with this enzyme?
        I
        > worry coz the site says the pectine, unbroken , will produce more
        > methanol and -or other funky undesirable by-products.
        > Bush is so thick, gotta make my own booze.
        > help!
        >



        There's not enough methanol produced in these small batches to do
        you any real harm. Read the archives. But of course, you do use
        best practice procedures & remove the heads, don't you? Do your
        stillin' & separatin' right, by the book,
        http://www.homedistiller.org and you'll be fine.


        Slainte!
        regards Harry
      • Robert Thomas
        I agree entirely with Harry, but in addition: 1. since you are in a tropical paradise, papaya is full of papain, an excellent protein degrading enzyme that
        Message 3 of 9 , May 5 12:33 AM
        • 0 Attachment
          I agree entirely with Harry,
          but in addition:
          1. since you are in a tropical paradise, papaya is full of papain, an
          excellent protein degrading enzyme that will break down pectin (try
          making papaya jam/jelly and getting it to set!)
          2. it is not pectin that goes on to be converted into methanol, it is
          the break-down products of pectin after you add pectic enzymes. Since
          anything that contains pectins contains pectic enzymes (enzymes work in
          both directions) you always get some methanol, with or without
          additional enzymes.
          3. using additional enzymes (or papaya juice/pulp) has the additional
          advantage that you won't be fermenting a thick porridge!

          Have a look in "Artisanal Distilling" in harry's library.
          cheers
          Rob.

          --- Harry <gnikomson2000@...> wrote:

          > --- In new_distillers@yahoogroups.com, "Miroslava" <Mrin97@...>
          > wrote:
          > >
          > > Hello people!
          > >
          > > Ive got a worry about breaking down the pectin of fruit
          > (mangoes,
          > > pinapples). I live in tropical paradise, meaning, beach: no
          > roads,
          > > no big supermarkets, no fancy stores.
          > > I have settled for bakers yeast, but what to do with this enzyme?
          > I
          > > worry coz the site says the pectine, unbroken , will produce more
          > > methanol and -or other funky undesirable by-products.
          > > Bush is so thick, gotta make my own booze.
          > > help!
          > >
          >
          >
          >
          > There's not enough methanol produced in these small batches to do
          > you any real harm. Read the archives. But of course, you do use
          > best practice procedures & remove the heads, don't you? Do your
          > stillin' & separatin' right, by the book,
          > http://www.homedistiller.org and you'll be fine.
          >
          >
          > Slainte!
          > regards Harry
          >
          >


          Cheers,
          Rob.



          ____________________________________________________________________________________
          We won't tell. Get more on shows you hate to love
          (and love to hate): Yahoo! TV's Guilty Pleasures list.
          http://tv.yahoo.com/collections/265
        • mstehelin
          Rob, So you are saying that he should use papaya in the fermentation? Does a more liquid must give you more alchohol, or is it just nicer to distill? Maybe a
          Message 4 of 9 , May 7 3:23 PM
          • 0 Attachment
            Rob,
            So you are saying that he should use papaya in the fermentation? Does
            a more liquid must give you more alchohol, or is it just nicer to
            distill? Maybe a fella could use papaya in other fruit musts then.....?
            Cheers


            --- In new_distillers@yahoogroups.com, Robert Thomas <whosbrewing@...>
            wrote:
            >
            > I agree entirely with Harry,
            > but in addition:
            > 1. since you are in a tropical paradise, papaya is full of papain, an
            > excellent protein degrading enzyme that will break down pectin (try
            > making papaya jam/jelly and getting it to set!)
            > 2. it is not pectin that goes on to be converted into methanol, it is
            > the break-down products of pectin after you add pectic enzymes. Since
            > anything that contains pectins contains pectic enzymes (enzymes work in
            > both directions) you always get some methanol, with or without
            > additional enzymes.
            > 3. using additional enzymes (or papaya juice/pulp) has the additional
            > advantage that you won't be fermenting a thick porridge!
            >
            > Have a look in "Artisanal Distilling" in harry's library.
            > cheers
            > Rob.
            >
            > --- Harry <gnikomson2000@...> wrote:
            >
            > > --- In new_distillers@yahoogroups.com, "Miroslava" <Mrin97@>
            > > wrote:
            > > >
            > > > Hello people!
            > > >
            > > > Ive got a worry about breaking down the pectin of fruit
            > > (mangoes,
            > > > pinapples). I live in tropical paradise, meaning, beach: no
            > > roads,
            > > > no big supermarkets, no fancy stores.
            > > > I have settled for bakers yeast, but what to do with this enzyme?
            > > I
            > > > worry coz the site says the pectine, unbroken , will produce more
            > > > methanol and -or other funky undesirable by-products.
            > > > Bush is so thick, gotta make my own booze.
            > > > help!
            > > >
            > >
            > >
            > >
            > > There's not enough methanol produced in these small batches to do
            > > you any real harm. Read the archives. But of course, you do use
            > > best practice procedures & remove the heads, don't you? Do your
            > > stillin' & separatin' right, by the book,
            > > http://www.homedistiller.org and you'll be fine.
            > >
            > >
            > > Slainte!
            > > regards Harry
            > >
            > >
            >
            >
            > Cheers,
            > Rob.
            >
            >
            >
            >
            ____________________________________________________________________________________
            > We won't tell. Get more on shows you hate to love
            > (and love to hate): Yahoo! TV's Guilty Pleasures list.
            > http://tv.yahoo.com/collections/265
            >
          • Robert Thomas
            The papaya will thin the mash. there are any number of reasons why a thin mash/wash is good, but mainly less mess and quicker settling (leading to less burning
            Message 5 of 9 , May 7 11:49 PM
            • 0 Attachment
              The papaya will thin the mash. there are any number of reasons why a
              thin mash/wash is good, but mainly less mess and quicker settling
              (leading to less burning in the boiler).
              Papaya costs a fortune here, but if you have ready access to it, then
              go for it, add a papaya to every fermentation just for the hell of it!
              Cheers
              Rob.

              --- mstehelin <mstehelin@...> wrote:

              > Rob,
              > So you are saying that he should use papaya in the fermentation? Does
              > a more liquid must give you more alchohol, or is it just nicer to
              > distill? Maybe a fella could use papaya in other fruit musts
              > then.....?
              > Cheers
              >
              >
              > --- In new_distillers@yahoogroups.com, Robert Thomas
              > <whosbrewing@...>
              > wrote:
              > >
              > > I agree entirely with Harry,
              > > but in addition:
              > > 1. since you are in a tropical paradise, papaya is full of papain,
              > an
              > > excellent protein degrading enzyme that will break down pectin (try
              > > making papaya jam/jelly and getting it to set!)
              > > 2. it is not pectin that goes on to be converted into methanol, it
              > is
              > > the break-down products of pectin after you add pectic enzymes.
              > Since
              > > anything that contains pectins contains pectic enzymes (enzymes
              > work in
              > > both directions) you always get some methanol, with or without
              > > additional enzymes.
              > > 3. using additional enzymes (or papaya juice/pulp) has the
              > additional
              > > advantage that you won't be fermenting a thick porridge!
              > >
              > > Have a look in "Artisanal Distilling" in harry's library.
              > > cheers
              > > Rob.
              > >
              > > --- Harry <gnikomson2000@...> wrote:
              > >
              > > > --- In new_distillers@yahoogroups.com, "Miroslava" <Mrin97@>
              > > > wrote:
              > > > >
              > > > > Hello people!
              > > > >
              > > > > Ive got a worry about breaking down the pectin of fruit
              > > > (mangoes,
              > > > > pinapples). I live in tropical paradise, meaning, beach: no
              > > > roads,
              > > > > no big supermarkets, no fancy stores.
              > > > > I have settled for bakers yeast, but what to do with this
              > enzyme?
              > > > I
              > > > > worry coz the site says the pectine, unbroken , will produce
              > more
              > > > > methanol and -or other funky undesirable by-products.
              > > > > Bush is so thick, gotta make my own booze.
              > > > > help!
              > > > >
              > > >
              > > >
              > > >
              > > > There's not enough methanol produced in these small batches to do
              >
              > > > you any real harm. Read the archives. But of course, you do use
              >
              > > > best practice procedures & remove the heads, don't you? Do your
              > > > stillin' & separatin' right, by the book,
              > > > http://www.homedistiller.org and you'll be fine.
              > > >
              > > >
              > > > Slainte!
              > > > regards Harry
              > > >
              > > >
              > >
              > >
              > > Cheers,
              > > Rob.
              > >
              > >
              > >
              > >
              >
              ____________________________________________________________________________________
              > > We won't tell. Get more on shows you hate to love
              > > (and love to hate): Yahoo! TV's Guilty Pleasures list.
              > > http://tv.yahoo.com/collections/265
              > >
              >
              >
              >


              Cheers,
              Rob.

              __________________________________________________
              Do You Yahoo!?
              Tired of spam? Yahoo! Mail has the best spam protection around
              http://mail.yahoo.com
            • mstehelin
              When you say quicker settling what do you mean? Do you mean the liquid separates from the solids faster and then you distill the liquid only? On that
              Message 6 of 9 , May 9 9:27 AM
              • 0 Attachment
                When you say "quicker settling" what do you mean? Do you mean the
                liquid separates from the solids faster and then you distill the
                liquid only? On that subject, What is the official word on distilling
                the sludge left over from wine making? I know that grappa is distilled
                from the pomace left over from wine fermentation. That has to have a
                pile of yeast left over in it. What about other beverages?
                Cheers
                Mitt

                --- In new_distillers@yahoogroups.com, Robert Thomas <whosbrewing@...>
                wrote:
                >
                > The papaya will thin the mash. there are any number of reasons why a
                > thin mash/wash is good, but mainly less mess and quicker settling
                > (leading to less burning in the boiler).
                > Papaya costs a fortune here, but if you have ready access to it, then
                > go for it, add a papaya to every fermentation just for the hell of it!
                > Cheers
                > Rob.
                >
                > --- mstehelin <mstehelin@...> wrote:
                >
                > > Rob,
                > > So you are saying that he should use papaya in the fermentation? Does
                > > a more liquid must give you more alchohol, or is it just nicer to
                > > distill? Maybe a fella could use papaya in other fruit musts
                > > then.....?
                > > Cheers
                > >
                > >
                > > --- In new_distillers@yahoogroups.com, Robert Thomas
                > > <whosbrewing@>
                > > wrote:
                > > >
                > > > I agree entirely with Harry,
                > > > but in addition:
                > > > 1. since you are in a tropical paradise, papaya is full of papain,
                > > an
                > > > excellent protein degrading enzyme that will break down pectin (try
                > > > making papaya jam/jelly and getting it to set!)
                > > > 2. it is not pectin that goes on to be converted into methanol, it
                > > is
                > > > the break-down products of pectin after you add pectic enzymes.
                > > Since
                > > > anything that contains pectins contains pectic enzymes (enzymes
                > > work in
                > > > both directions) you always get some methanol, with or without
                > > > additional enzymes.
                > > > 3. using additional enzymes (or papaya juice/pulp) has the
                > > additional
                > > > advantage that you won't be fermenting a thick porridge!
                > > >
                > > > Have a look in "Artisanal Distilling" in harry's library.
                > > > cheers
                > > > Rob.
                > > >
                > > > --- Harry <gnikomson2000@> wrote:
                > > >
                > > > > --- In new_distillers@yahoogroups.com, "Miroslava" <Mrin97@>
                > > > > wrote:
                > > > > >
                > > > > > Hello people!
                > > > > >
                > > > > > Ive got a worry about breaking down the pectin of fruit
                > > > > (mangoes,
                > > > > > pinapples). I live in tropical paradise, meaning, beach: no
                > > > > roads,
                > > > > > no big supermarkets, no fancy stores.
                > > > > > I have settled for bakers yeast, but what to do with this
                > > enzyme?
                > > > > I
                > > > > > worry coz the site says the pectine, unbroken , will produce
                > > more
                > > > > > methanol and -or other funky undesirable by-products.
                > > > > > Bush is so thick, gotta make my own booze.
                > > > > > help!
                > > > > >
                > > > >
                > > > >
                > > > >
                > > > > There's not enough methanol produced in these small batches to do
                > >
                > > > > you any real harm. Read the archives. But of course, you do use
                > >
                > > > > best practice procedures & remove the heads, don't you? Do your
                > > > > stillin' & separatin' right, by the book,
                > > > > http://www.homedistiller.org and you'll be fine.
                > > > >
                > > > >
                > > > > Slainte!
                > > > > regards Harry
                > > > >
                > > > >
                > > >
                > > >
                > > > Cheers,
                > > > Rob.
                > > >
                > > >
                > > >
                > > >
                > >
                >
                ____________________________________________________________________________________
                > > > We won't tell. Get more on shows you hate to love
                > > > (and love to hate): Yahoo! TV's Guilty Pleasures list.
                > > > http://tv.yahoo.com/collections/265
                > > >
                > >
                > >
                > >
                >
                >
                > Cheers,
                > Rob.
                >
                > __________________________________________________
                > Do You Yahoo!?
                > Tired of spam? Yahoo! Mail has the best spam protection around
                > http://mail.yahoo.com
                >
              • Robert Thomas
                ... that s exactly what I mean ... Good question, but i have no answer. ... Cheers, Rob. __________________________________________________ Do You Yahoo!?
                Message 7 of 9 , May 9 11:28 AM
                • 0 Attachment
                  --- mstehelin <mstehelin@...> wrote:

                  > When you say "quicker settling" what do you mean? Do you mean the
                  > liquid separates from the solids faster and then you distill the

                  that's exactly what I mean

                  > liquid only? On that subject, What is the official word on
                  > distilling
                  > the sludge left over from wine making? I know that grappa is
                  > distilled
                  > from the pomace left over from wine fermentation. That has to have a
                  > pile of yeast left over in it. What about other beverages?

                  Good question, but i have no answer.


                  > Cheers
                  > Mitt
                  >
                  > --- In new_distillers@yahoogroups.com, Robert Thomas
                  > <whosbrewing@...>
                  > wrote:
                  > >
                  > > The papaya will thin the mash. there are any number of reasons why
                  > a
                  > > thin mash/wash is good, but mainly less mess and quicker settling
                  > > (leading to less burning in the boiler).
                  > > Papaya costs a fortune here, but if you have ready access to it,
                  > then
                  > > go for it, add a papaya to every fermentation just for the hell of
                  > it!
                  > > Cheers
                  > > Rob.
                  > >
                  > > --- mstehelin <mstehelin@...> wrote:
                  > >
                  > > > Rob,
                  > > > So you are saying that he should use papaya in the fermentation?
                  > Does
                  > > > a more liquid must give you more alchohol, or is it just nicer to
                  > > > distill? Maybe a fella could use papaya in other fruit musts
                  > > > then.....?
                  > > > Cheers
                  > > >
                  > > >
                  > > > --- In new_distillers@yahoogroups.com, Robert Thomas
                  > > > <whosbrewing@>
                  > > > wrote:
                  > > > >
                  > > > > I agree entirely with Harry,
                  > > > > but in addition:
                  > > > > 1. since you are in a tropical paradise, papaya is full of
                  > papain,
                  > > > an
                  > > > > excellent protein degrading enzyme that will break down pectin
                  > (try
                  > > > > making papaya jam/jelly and getting it to set!)
                  > > > > 2. it is not pectin that goes on to be converted into methanol,
                  > it
                  > > > is
                  > > > > the break-down products of pectin after you add pectic enzymes.
                  > > > Since
                  > > > > anything that contains pectins contains pectic enzymes (enzymes
                  > > > work in
                  > > > > both directions) you always get some methanol, with or without
                  > > > > additional enzymes.
                  > > > > 3. using additional enzymes (or papaya juice/pulp) has the
                  > > > additional
                  > > > > advantage that you won't be fermenting a thick porridge!
                  > > > >
                  > > > > Have a look in "Artisanal Distilling" in harry's library.
                  > > > > cheers
                  > > > > Rob.
                  > > > >
                  > > > > --- Harry <gnikomson2000@> wrote:
                  > > > >
                  > > > > > --- In new_distillers@yahoogroups.com, "Miroslava" <Mrin97@>
                  > > > > > wrote:
                  > > > > > >
                  > > > > > > Hello people!
                  > > > > > >
                  > > > > > > Ive got a worry about breaking down the pectin of fruit
                  > > > > > (mangoes,
                  > > > > > > pinapples). I live in tropical paradise, meaning, beach:
                  > no
                  > > > > > roads,
                  > > > > > > no big supermarkets, no fancy stores.
                  > > > > > > I have settled for bakers yeast, but what to do with this
                  > > > enzyme?
                  > > > > > I
                  > > > > > > worry coz the site says the pectine, unbroken , will
                  > produce
                  > > > more
                  > > > > > > methanol and -or other funky undesirable by-products.
                  > > > > > > Bush is so thick, gotta make my own booze.
                  > > > > > > help!
                  > > > > > >
                  > > > > >
                  > > > > >
                  > > > > >
                  > > > > > There's not enough methanol produced in these small batches
                  > to do
                  > > >
                  > > > > > you any real harm. Read the archives. But of course, you do
                  > use
                  > > >
                  > > > > > best practice procedures & remove the heads, don't you? Do
                  > your
                  > > > > > stillin' & separatin' right, by the book,
                  > > > > > http://www.homedistiller.org and you'll be fine.
                  > > > > >
                  > > > > >
                  > > > > > Slainte!
                  > > > > > regards Harry
                  > > > > >
                  > > > > >
                  > > > >
                  > > > >
                  > > > > Cheers,
                  > > > > Rob.
                  > > > >
                  > > > >
                  > > > >
                  > > > >
                  > > >
                  > >
                  >
                  ____________________________________________________________________________________
                  > > > > We won't tell. Get more on shows you hate to love
                  > > > > (and love to hate): Yahoo! TV's Guilty Pleasures list.
                  > > > > http://tv.yahoo.com/collections/265
                  > > > >
                  > > >
                  > > >
                  > > >
                  > >
                  > >
                  > > Cheers,
                  > > Rob.
                  > >
                  > > __________________________________________________
                  > > Do You Yahoo!?
                  > > Tired of spam? Yahoo! Mail has the best spam protection around
                  > > http://mail.yahoo.com
                  > >
                  >
                  >
                  >


                  Cheers,
                  Rob.

                  __________________________________________________
                  Do You Yahoo!?
                  Tired of spam? Yahoo! Mail has the best spam protection around
                  http://mail.yahoo.com
                • gff_stwrt
                  ... What is the official word on distilling ... I know that grappa is distilled from the pomace left over from wine fermentation. snip Cheers, Mitt Hi, Robert,
                  Message 8 of 9 , May 10 2:51 AM
                  • 0 Attachment
                    --- In new_distillers@yahoogroups.com,
                    Robert Thomas <whosbrewing@...> wrote:
                    >
                    > --- mstehelin <mstehelin@...> wrote:

                    > snip

                    What is the official word on distilling
                    > > the sludge left over from wine making?
                    I know that grappa is distilled from the
                    pomace left over from wine fermentation.

                    snip

                    Cheers, Mitt

                    Hi, Robert, Mitt; hi folks,

                    My brother works for a company that gets
                    in truckloads of stuff left over from
                    winemaking. I think their main product is
                    tartaric acid, and they recover alcohol
                    too, I guess by distillation.

                    >
                    > >
                    > > --- In new_distillers@yahoogroups.com,
                    Robert Thomas <whosbrewing@> wrote:

                    > > > The papaya will thin the mash. there
                    are any number of reasons why a thin
                    mash/wash is good, but mainly less mess and
                    quicker settling(leading to less burning
                    in the boiler).

                    snip

                    I had around a hundred litres of cheap
                    cask wine, and the supermarket owner gave
                    me another hundred and a bit that was out
                    of date. I have frozen it all several
                    times(and removed a lot of the water ice)
                    and I now
                    have around seventyfive litres
                    that won't form any more ice. I'll
                    distill it when the still is finally going.
                    It was really amazing the amount of fine
                    powdery sludge that sank to the bottom of the
                    buckets, I'm guessing that a lot of it was
                    bentonite used in fining the wine. But there
                    was also quite a bit of a sort of fairly
                    stiff jelly there
                    when the liquid was icy-cold ( it seemed to
                    disappear as the wine came back to ambient
                    temperature)and I suppose that was formed
                    due to the pectin in the grapes.

                    Regards,
                    The baker
                  • waljaco
                    A certain amount of lees (wine sediment) is also allowed along with grape pomace for grappa in the EU. Most fruit spirits are obtained by distilling the whole
                    Message 9 of 9 , May 10 3:57 AM
                    • 0 Attachment
                      A certain amount of lees (wine sediment) is also allowed along with
                      grape pomace for grappa in the EU.
                      Most fruit spirits are obtained by distilling the whole mash to get a
                      decent yield. In the Balkans they have a paddle in the pot which stirs
                      the pulp to prevent scorching.
                      wal
                      --- In new_distillers@yahoogroups.com, "gff_stwrt" <gff_stwrt@...> wrote:
                      >
                      > --- In new_distillers@yahoogroups.com,
                      > Robert Thomas <whosbrewing@> wrote:
                      > >
                      > > --- mstehelin <mstehelin@> wrote:
                      >
                      > > snip
                      >
                      > What is the official word on distilling
                      > > > the sludge left over from wine making?
                      > I know that grappa is distilled from the
                      > pomace left over from wine fermentation.
                      >
                      > snip
                      >
                      > Cheers, Mitt
                      >
                      > Hi, Robert, Mitt; hi folks,
                      >
                      > My brother works for a company that gets
                      > in truckloads of stuff left over from
                      > winemaking. I think their main product is
                      > tartaric acid, and they recover alcohol
                      > too, I guess by distillation.
                      >
                      > >
                      > > >
                      > > > --- In new_distillers@yahoogroups.com,
                      > Robert Thomas <whosbrewing@> wrote:
                      >
                      > > > > The papaya will thin the mash. there
                      > are any number of reasons why a thin
                      > mash/wash is good, but mainly less mess and
                      > quicker settling(leading to less burning
                      > in the boiler).
                      >
                      > snip
                      >
                      > I had around a hundred litres of cheap
                      > cask wine, and the supermarket owner gave
                      > me another hundred and a bit that was out
                      > of date. I have frozen it all several
                      > times(and removed a lot of the water ice)
                      > and I now
                      > have around seventyfive litres
                      > that won't form any more ice. I'll
                      > distill it when the still is finally going.
                      > It was really amazing the amount of fine
                      > powdery sludge that sank to the bottom of the
                      > buckets, I'm guessing that a lot of it was
                      > bentonite used in fining the wine. But there
                      > was also quite a bit of a sort of fairly
                      > stiff jelly there
                      > when the liquid was icy-cold ( it seemed to
                      > disappear as the wine came back to ambient
                      > temperature)and I suppose that was formed
                      > due to the pectin in the grapes.
                      >
                      > Regards,
                      > The baker
                      >
                    Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.