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Re: Feints/Solenoids

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  • Harry
    ... spring. DC ... a plunger or ... of the ... ubiquitous 555 ... The patent in question that Riku posted the link to shows all the drawings & documentation
    Message 1 of 3 , Apr 1, 2007
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      --- In new_distillers@yahoogroups.com, "Anthony Athawes"
      <Anthony.Athawes@...> wrote:
      >
      > The normal solenoid is a coil with a moveable core and a return
      spring. DC
      > are more effective than AC. We need to know whether there is
      a "plunger" or
      > just the generation of eddy currents. This exhausts my knowledge
      of the
      > subject, but, if I were experimenting, I'd start with the
      ubiquitous 555
      > timer chip to vary the frquency of vibration.
      >
      > Back to Rum.
      >
      > Tony A
      >



      The patent in question that Riku posted the link to shows all the
      drawings & documentation necessary.

      Slainte!
      regards Harry
    • abbababbaccc
      Yep, solenoid typically means a magnetic device with moving plunger. However, in this case the term solenoid was used to describe a doughnut shaped coil. By
      Message 2 of 3 , Apr 1, 2007
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        Yep, solenoid typically means a magnetic device with moving plunger.
        However, in this case the term solenoid was used to describe
        a "doughnut" shaped coil. By using sinuswave shaped AC you create a
        pulsing magnetic field around the solenoid. Where my knowledge ends is
        how to create such AC and how to size that solenoid in order to create
        desired effect.

        Cheers, Riku

        --- In new_distillers@yahoogroups.com, "Anthony Athawes"
        <Anthony.Athawes@...> wrote:
        >
        > The normal solenoid is a coil with a moveable core and a return
        spring. DC
        > are more effective than AC. We need to know whether there is
        a "plunger" or
        > just the generation of eddy currents. This exhausts my knowledge of
        the
        > subject, but, if I were experimenting, I'd start with the ubiquitous
        555
        > timer chip to vary the frquency of vibration.
        >
        > Back to Rum.
        >
        > Tony A
        >
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