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Re: An all glass still?

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  • Gary
    Hi all, I am building a small (lab sized)pot-still with a thumper to learn the ropes while assembling the parts and knowlege for something bigger. I already
    Message 1 of 6 , Feb 23, 2007
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      Hi all,

      I am building a small (lab sized)pot-still with a thumper to "learn
      the ropes" while assembling the parts and knowlege for something
      bigger. I already have fermented a small batch of sugar/fruit juice
      champagne yeast mash to what my first experience with a hydrometer
      tells me is 14% Not too shabby! It is clear (well not cloudy anyway)
      and actually tastes alright.

      I would like to use lab glassware for the boiler and thumper and have
      already fabricated the connecting tubing and condenser coil from
      copper. (best of all worlds?)

      My question is what do I use for stoppers? Can I use black lab
      stoppers? I have read that I must NOT use any plastic which will
      contact hot high proof product. So what can I use? How about real
      cork?

      Thanks in advance,

      Gary.




      --- In new_distillers@yahoogroups.com, "Dean Thomas" <deanlil@...>
      wrote:
      >
      > Hi grslp,
      > It is possible but I imagine it would very fragile,expensive and
      inefficient
      > (no insulation).
      > Most people use stainless steel copper and brass as the main
      materials for
      > thier stills both new and recycled to save money, with most
      isulating the
      > boiler and the fractionating/reflux column.
      >
      > Dean.
      >
      > ----- Original Message -----
      > From: "grslp" <grslp223@...>
      > To: <new_distillers@yahoogroups.com>
      > Sent: Saturday, September 24, 2005 4:18 PM
      > Subject: [new_distillers] An all glass still?
      >
      >
      > > Hi everybody. My first post here. I'm currently a pre-pharmacy
      > > student and will be entering pharmacy school next Fall. I'm
      > > currently taking Organic Chemistry I. Last week we did a lab that
      > > was designed to introduce us to various distilling methods. One
      > > method was using a "simple still" which had a short "top" tube in
      > > front of the condensor, the second method was using a fractioning
      > > type still, and finally Steam distillation. The stills we set up
      in
      > > lab were made out of glass. The "boiling pot" was a glass globe
      > > (about 250 mL) attached to a long glass tube (for the fractioning
      > > method) that was filled with glass beads. The condensor was a
      glass
      > > tube that angled downward from the fractioning tube. It was
      a "tube
      > > within a tube" design with water running through the outside tube.
      > > For heat, we set the boiling globe on a heating pad of sorts. A
      > > thermometer was held in place with the tip in the fractioning tube
      > > just below the condensing tube. I thought this was really cool.
      We
      > > were separating a 50-50 mix of acetone and water. Ever since last
      > > week I've been reading several sites about how to do this to make
      > > ethanol at home.
      > >
      > > Would it be possible to make one of these on a large scale (Normal
      > > still size - larger than a college lab still) at home using all
      glass
      > > products? Use marbles in the fractioning tube?
      > >
      > >
      > >
      > >
      > >
      > >
      > >
      > > New Distillers group archives are at http://archive.nnytech.net/
      > > FAQ and other information available at http://homedistiller.org
      > >
      > >
      > > Yahoo! Groups Links
      > >
      > >
      > >
      > >
      > >
      > >
      > >
      > >
      >
    • Link D'Antoni
      Gary, I have a mini glass still picture loaded in the Photo section of Distillers Group. Look for Link s Stuff. When running distillation (D-86) in a lab my
      Message 2 of 6 , Feb 23, 2007
      • 0 Attachment
        Gary,

        I have a mini glass still picture loaded in the Photo
        section of Distillers Group. Look for Link's Stuff.

        When running distillation (D-86) in a lab my group had
        used cork stoppers with the therometer hole punched
        out through the cork which sat on top of the glass
        flask.

        My Mini Glass has a rubber cork. There are various
        size white rubber stoppers and corks available on the
        web. Black lab stopper, as you know, will give an
        asphalt smell. YUCK

        Link
        ***
        WARNING: The consumtion of alcohol can make you
        forg...for...for....what was I saying?



        --- Gary <fly_boy_bc@...> wrote:

        > Hi all,
        >
        > I am building a small (lab sized)pot-still with a
        > thumper to "learn
        > the ropes" while assembling the parts and knowlege
        > for something
        > bigger. I already have fermented a small batch of
        > sugar/fruit juice
        > champagne yeast mash to what my first experience
        > with a hydrometer
        > tells me is 14% Not too shabby! It is clear (well
        > not cloudy anyway)
        > and actually tastes alright.
        >
        > I would like to use lab glassware for the boiler and
        > thumper and have
        > already fabricated the connecting tubing and
        > condenser coil from
        > copper. (best of all worlds?)
        >
        > My question is what do I use for stoppers? Can I use
        > black lab
        > stoppers? I have read that I must NOT use any
        > plastic which will
        > contact hot high proof product. So what can I use?
        > How about real
        > cork?
        >
        > Thanks in advance,
        >
        > Gary.
        >
        >
        >
        >
        > --- In new_distillers@yahoogroups.com, "Dean Thomas"
        > <deanlil@...>
        > wrote:
        > >
        > > Hi grslp,
        > > It is possible but I imagine it would very
        > fragile,expensive and
        > inefficient
        > > (no insulation).
        > > Most people use stainless steel copper and brass
        > as the main
        > materials for
        > > thier stills both new and recycled to save money,
        > with most
        > isulating the
        > > boiler and the fractionating/reflux column.
        > >
        > > Dean.
        > >
        > > ----- Original Message -----
        > > From: "grslp" <grslp223@...>
        > > To: <new_distillers@yahoogroups.com>
        > > Sent: Saturday, September 24, 2005 4:18 PM
        > > Subject: [new_distillers] An all glass still?
        > >
        > >
        > > > Hi everybody. My first post here. I'm
        > currently a pre-pharmacy
        > > > student and will be entering pharmacy school
        > next Fall. I'm
        > > > currently taking Organic Chemistry I. Last week
        > we did a lab that
        > > > was designed to introduce us to various
        > distilling methods. One
        > > > method was using a "simple still" which had a
        > short "top" tube in
        > > > front of the condensor, the second method was
        > using a fractioning
        > > > type still, and finally Steam distillation. The
        > stills we set up
        > in
        > > > lab were made out of glass. The "boiling pot"
        > was a glass globe
        > > > (about 250 mL) attached to a long glass tube
        > (for the fractioning
        > > > method) that was filled with glass beads. The
        > condensor was a
        > glass
        > > > tube that angled downward from the fractioning
        > tube. It was
        > a "tube
        > > > within a tube" design with water running through
        > the outside tube.
        > > > For heat, we set the boiling globe on a heating
        > pad of sorts. A
        > > > thermometer was held in place with the tip in
        > the fractioning tube
        > > > just below the condensing tube. I thought this
        > was really cool.
        > We
        > > > were separating a 50-50 mix of acetone and
        > water. Ever since last
        > > > week I've been reading several sites about how
        > to do this to make
        > > > ethanol at home.
        > > >
        > > > Would it be possible to make one of these on a
        > large scale (Normal
        > > > still size - larger than a college lab still) at
        > home using all
        > glass
        > > > products? Use marbles in the fractioning tube?
        > > >
        > > >
        > > >
        > > >
        > > >
        > > >
        > > >
        > > > New Distillers group archives are at
        > http://archive.nnytech.net/
        > > > FAQ and other information available at
        > http://homedistiller.org
        > > >
        > > >
        > > > Yahoo! Groups Links
        > > >
        > > >
        > > >
        > > >
        > > >
        > > >
        > > >
        > > >
        > >
        >
        >
        >




        ____________________________________________________________________________________
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      • morganfield1
        Hi Gary, I use cork on my boiler, but it s a small cork (wine bottle) that the thermometer sticks through ( the cork will blow out if there s a pressure
        Message 3 of 6 , Feb 24, 2007
        • 0 Attachment
          Hi Gary,
          I use cork on my boiler, but it's a small cork (wine bottle) that the
          thermometer sticks through ( the cork will blow out if there's a
          pressure problem, Hopefully). I have to replace it now and then, it
          turns nasty where in contact with the steam. HTH
          Tip one, Morgan

          --- In new_distillers@yahoogroups.com, "Gary" <fly_boy_bc@...> wrote:
          >
          > Hi all,
          >
          > I am building a small (lab sized)pot-still with a thumper to "learn
          > the ropes" while assembling the parts and knowlege for something
          > bigger. I already have fermented a small batch of sugar/fruit
          juice
          > champagne yeast mash to what my first experience with a hydrometer
          > tells me is 14% Not too shabby! It is clear (well not cloudy
          anyway)
          > and actually tastes alright.
          >
          > I would like to use lab glassware for the boiler and thumper and
          have
          > already fabricated the connecting tubing and condenser coil from
          > copper. (best of all worlds?)
          >
          > My question is what do I use for stoppers? Can I use black lab
          > stoppers? I have read that I must NOT use any plastic which will
          > contact hot high proof product. So what can I use? How about real
          > cork?
          >
          > Thanks in advance,
          >
          > Gary.
          >
          >
          >
          >
          > --- In new_distillers@yahoogroups.com, "Dean Thomas" <deanlil@>
          > wrote:
          > >
          > > Hi grslp,
          > > It is possible but I imagine it would very fragile,expensive and
          > inefficient
          > > (no insulation).
          > > Most people use stainless steel copper and brass as the main
          > materials for
          > > thier stills both new and recycled to save money, with most
          > isulating the
          > > boiler and the fractionating/reflux column.
          > >
          > > Dean.
          > >
          > > ----- Original Message -----
          > > From: "grslp" <grslp223@>
          > > To: <new_distillers@yahoogroups.com>
          > > Sent: Saturday, September 24, 2005 4:18 PM
          > > Subject: [new_distillers] An all glass still?
          > >
          > >
          > > > Hi everybody. My first post here. I'm currently a pre-pharmacy
          > > > student and will be entering pharmacy school next Fall. I'm
          > > > currently taking Organic Chemistry I. Last week we did a lab
          that
          > > > was designed to introduce us to various distilling methods. One
          > > > method was using a "simple still" which had a short "top" tube
          in
          > > > front of the condensor, the second method was using a
          fractioning
          > > > type still, and finally Steam distillation. The stills we set
          up
          > in
          > > > lab were made out of glass. The "boiling pot" was a glass globe
          > > > (about 250 mL) attached to a long glass tube (for the
          fractioning
          > > > method) that was filled with glass beads. The condensor was a
          > glass
          > > > tube that angled downward from the fractioning tube. It was
          > a "tube
          > > > within a tube" design with water running through the outside
          tube.
          > > > For heat, we set the boiling globe on a heating pad of sorts. A
          > > > thermometer was held in place with the tip in the fractioning
          tube
          > > > just below the condensing tube. I thought this was really
          cool.
          > We
          > > > were separating a 50-50 mix of acetone and water. Ever since
          last
          > > > week I've been reading several sites about how to do this to
          make
          > > > ethanol at home.
          > > >
          > > > Would it be possible to make one of these on a large scale
          (Normal
          > > > still size - larger than a college lab still) at home using all
          > glass
          > > > products? Use marbles in the fractioning tube?
          > > >
          > > >
          > > >
          > > >
          > > >
          > > >
          > > >
          > > > New Distillers group archives are at
          http://archive.nnytech.net/
          > > > FAQ and other information available at http://homedistiller.org
          > > >
          > > >
          > > > Yahoo! Groups Links
          > > >
          > > >
          > > >
          > > >
          > > >
          > > >
          > > >
          > > >
          > >
          >
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