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reflux still equalibrium

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  • okie_firewater
    Can someone explain to me why if my still with a 2 X3 column on it reaches equalibrium at say 171f to 176f (depending on the run and variouse other
    Message 1 of 3 , Jan 4 7:11 PM
      Can someone explain to me why if my still with a 2"X3' column on it
      reaches equalibrium at say 171f to 176f (depending on the run and
      variouse other conditions)why the foreshots and heads wouldn't contain
      a large amount of good ethanol.
      if the lesser alcohols boil off at a lower temp and i stay in total
      reflux for 30 min. wouldn't the the lesser alcohols vaporize and
      condense just as the good alcohol does? If this is so doesn't that
      mean its one big mix when i turn on the collection valve.
      and if this is also true wouldn't it be possible that there is still
      a large amount of these lesser alcohols still codensing through the
      still along with the good stuff?
      OR could i just be over thinking the math becaUSE MY HEAD IS STARTING
      TO HURT!!
    • tyler_97355
      The Compleat Distiller has a good expaination of this. Here is a breif description. The column condenser is set to run at 100% reflux, returning all rising
      Message 2 of 3 , Jan 5 1:47 PM
        The Compleat Distiller has a good expaination of this. Here is a breif
        description.

        The column condenser is set to run at 100% reflux, returning all
        rising vapors. Over time, the most volatile component will find its
        way to the top of the column, and the less volatile components will
        work their way downward, establishing a state of equilibrium. The top
        zone of the column will have a constant temperature, equal to the
        boiling point of the most volatile component concentrated there, and
        it will become a constant composition "reservoir zone".

        Its like oil and water layered. If you pour it out slowly, you can
        remove all the oil without losing any water. The idea is to remove it
        SLOWLY, so that you only remove the top layer of vapor.

        -Tyler




        --- In new_distillers@yahoogroups.com, "okie_firewater"
        <okie_firewater@...> wrote:
        >
        > Can someone explain to me why if my still with a 2"X3' column on it
        > reaches equalibrium at say 171f to 176f (depending on the run and
        > variouse other conditions)why the foreshots and heads wouldn't contain
        > a large amount of good ethanol.
        > if the lesser alcohols boil off at a lower temp and i stay in total
        > reflux for 30 min. wouldn't the the lesser alcohols vaporize and
        > condense just as the good alcohol does? If this is so doesn't that
        > mean its one big mix when i turn on the collection valve.
        > and if this is also true wouldn't it be possible that there is still
        > a large amount of these lesser alcohols still codensing through the
        > still along with the good stuff?
        > OR could i just be over thinking the math becaUSE MY HEAD IS STARTING
        > TO HURT!!
        >
      • okie_firewater
        ... breif ... top ... and ... it ... on it ... and ... contain ... total ... and ... that ... still ... the ... STARTING ... thanks tyler, My fellow
        Message 3 of 3 , Jan 5 3:31 PM
          --- In new_distillers@yahoogroups.com, "tyler_97355" <kd7enm@...>
          wrote:
          >
          > The Compleat Distiller has a good expaination of this. Here is a
          breif
          > description.
          >
          > The column condenser is set to run at 100% reflux, returning all
          > rising vapors. Over time, the most volatile component will find its
          > way to the top of the column, and the less volatile components will
          > work their way downward, establishing a state of equilibrium. The
          top
          > zone of the column will have a constant temperature, equal to the
          > boiling point of the most volatile component concentrated there,
          and
          > it will become a constant composition "reservoir zone".
          >
          > Its like oil and water layered. If you pour it out slowly, you can
          > remove all the oil without losing any water. The idea is to remove
          it
          > SLOWLY, so that you only remove the top layer of vapor.
          >
          > -Tyler
          >
          >
          >
          >
          > --- In new_distillers@yahoogroups.com, "okie_firewater"
          > <okie_firewater@> wrote:
          > >
          > > Can someone explain to me why if my still with a 2"X3' column
          on it
          > > reaches equalibrium at say 171f to 176f (depending on the run
          and
          > > variouse other conditions)why the foreshots and heads wouldn't
          contain
          > > a large amount of good ethanol.
          > > if the lesser alcohols boil off at a lower temp and i stay in
          total
          > > reflux for 30 min. wouldn't the the lesser alcohols vaporize
          and
          > > condense just as the good alcohol does? If this is so doesn't
          that
          > > mean its one big mix when i turn on the collection valve.
          > > and if this is also true wouldn't it be possible that there is
          still
          > > a large amount of these lesser alcohols still codensing through
          the
          > > still along with the good stuff?
          > > OR could i just be over thinking the math becaUSE MY HEAD IS
          STARTING
          > > TO HURT!!
          > >
          thanks tyler,
          My fellow underground distilling club members will appreciate that
          simple explanation, since we're all new to this.
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