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Boiling Point vs Altitude Correction Table

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  • Harry
    To calculate the boiling point of water at a location on any specific day use the following equation: Boiling point of water = Boiling point at specified
    Message 1 of 3 , Dec 29, 2006
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      To calculate the boiling point of water at a location on any specific day use the following equation:
       
      Boiling point of water = Boiling point at specified altitude (Table 1) ± boiling point barometric correction (Table 2).

      In the tables, the following equations have been used:

      Pressure (in. Hg) = 29.921* (1-6.8753*0.000001 * altitude, ft.)^5.2559
      Boiling point = 49.161 * Ln (in. Hg) + 44.932
       
       
       TABLE  1
       Changes in Standard Temperature and Pressure (in Hg) as a Function of Altitude
       
       (Ref. 1)
       TABLE  2
       
      Boiling Point as a Function of 
      Barometric Pressure
       
       (Ref. 2)
      Altitude (ft.)
      Pressure
      (in. Hg)
      Boiling pt.
      (° F)
       
      Pressure
      (in. Hg)
      Boiling pt. 
      (° F)
      Boiling pt.
      [added or reduced]
      (° F)
      -500
      30.466
      212.9
       
      27.6
      208.04
      -3.96
      0
      29.921
      212.0
       
      27.8
      208.39
      -3.61
      500
      29.384
      211.1
       
      28.0
      208.75
      -3.25
      1000
      28.855
      210.2
       
      28.2
      209.10
      -2.90
      2000
      27.821
      208.4
       
      28.4
      209.44
      -2.56
      2500
      27.315
      207.5
       
      28.6
      209.79
      -2.21
      3000
      26.817
      206.6
       
      28.8
      210.13
      -1.87
      3500
      26.326
      205.7
       
      29.0
      210.47
      -1.53
      4000
      25.842
      204.8
       
      29.2
      210.81
      -1.19
      4500
      25.365
      203.9
       
      29.4
      211.15
      -0.85
      5000
      24.896
      203.0
       
      29.6
      211.48
      -0.52
      5500
      24.434
      202.0
       
      29.8
      211.81
      -0.19
      6000
      23.978
      201.1
       
      29.921
      212.00
      0.00
      6500
      23.530
      200.2
       
      30.0
      212.14
      0.14
      7000
      23.088
      199.3
       
      30.2
      212.46
      0.46
      7500
      22.653
      198.3
       
      30.4
      212.79
      0.79
      8000
      22.225
      197.4
       
      30.6
      213.11
      1.11
      8500
      21.803
      196.4
       
      30.8
      213.43
      1.43
      9000
      21.388
      195.5
       
      31.0
      213.75
      1.75
      9500
      20.979
      194.6
       
      31.2
      214.07
      2.07
      10000
      20.577
      193.6
       
      31.4
      214.38
      2.38
       

       

      [ Source: http://www.hi-tm.com/Documents/Calib-boil.html ]

       

      Slainte!

      regards Harry

    • Robert Thomas
      Harry, that is really nice, but is it perhaps a little distracting? I mean in the sense that we really ought to be concentrating on column stability not
      Message 2 of 3 , Jan 2, 2007
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        Harry,
        that is really nice, but is it perhaps a little distracting? I mean in
        the sense that we really ought to be concentrating on column stability
        not accurate measurement. Ah, but then to answer my own question, is
        this for pot-stills?
        Then a further question, I bet most peops are using electronic
        thermometers. These say resolution X, accuracy Y (where X > Y usually).
        Is there an idiots guide (for peops like me) as to what my reading
        compares to the real temp?
        I think it is confusing.
        cheers
        Rob.

        --- Harry <gnikomson2000@...> wrote:

        >
        > To calculate the boiling point of water at a location on any
        > specific
        > day use the following equation: Boiling point of water = Boiling
        > point
        > at specified altitude (Table 1) ± boiling point barometric correction
        > (Table 2).
        > In the tables, the following equations have been used: Pressure (in.
        > Hg) = 29.921* (1-6.8753*0.000001 * altitude, ft.)^5.2559 Boiling
        > point =
        > 49.161 * Ln (in. Hg) + 44.932 TABLE 1 Changes in
        > Standard
        > Temperature and Pressure (in Hg) as a Function of Altitude (Ref.
        > 1)
        > TABLE 2 Boiling Point as a Function of Barometric Pressure
        > (Ref. 2) Altitude (ft.) Pressure (in. Hg) Boiling pt. (° F)
        > Pressure (in. Hg) Boiling pt. (° F) Boiling pt. [added or reduced]
        > (° F) -500 30.466 212.9 27.6 208.04 -3.96 0 29.921
        > 212.0 27.8 208.39 -3.61 500 29.384 211.1 28.0 208.75
        > -3.25 1000 28.855 210.2 28.2 209.10 -2.90 2000 27.821
        > 208.4 28.4 209.44 -2.56 2500 27.315 207.5 28.6 209.79
        > -2.21 3000 26.817 206.6 28.8 210.13 -1.87 3500 26.326
        > 205.7 29.0 210.47 -1.53 4000 25.842 204.8 29.2 210.81
        > -1.19 4500 25.365 203.9 29.4 211.15 -0.85 5000 24.896
        > 203.0 29.6 211.48 -0.52 5500 24.434 202.0 29.8 211.81
        > -0.19 6000 23.978 201.1 29.921 212.00 0.00 6500 23.530
        > 200.2 30.0 212.14 0.14 7000 23.088 199.3 30.2 212.46
        > 0.46 7500 22.653 198.3 30.4 212.79 0.79 8000 22.225
        > 197.4
        > 30.6 213.11 1.11 8500 21.803 196.4 30.8 213.43 1.43
        > 9000
        > 21.388 195.5 31.0 213.75 1.75 9500 20.979 194.6 31.2
        > 214.07 2.07 10000 20.577 193.6 31.4 214.38 2.38
        >
        >
        > [ Source: http://www.hi-tm.com/Documents/Calib-boil.html
        > <http://www.hi-tm.com/Documents/Calib-boil.html> ]
        >
        >
        >
        > Slainte!
        >
        > regards Harry
        >
        >


        Cheers,
        Rob.

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      • Harry
        ... mean in ... stability ... & Happy New Year to you also, and everyone. You re right of course, Rob. I posted it in response to an earlier poster who was
        Message 3 of 3 , Jan 2, 2007
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          --- In new_distillers@yahoogroups.com, Robert Thomas
          <whosbrewing@...> wrote:
          >
          > Harry,
          > that is really nice, but is it perhaps a little distracting? I
          mean in
          > the sense that we really ought to be concentrating on column
          stability
          > not accurate measurement.



          & Happy New Year to you also, and everyone.
          You're right of course, Rob. I posted it in response to an earlier
          poster who was trying to calculate the BP. He's 6000 ft up.

          In truth, the BP will be whatever it is for that altitude, that
          barometric pressure, that instrument accuracy, and above all...that
          particular mixture of water, solvents, & congeners. As long as the
          reading is steady. Another good reason for keeping meticulous run
          records, at least while one is figuring out their particular still &
          location.


          Slainte!
          regards Harry
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