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Re: Advantage of tall column

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  • tyler_97355
    ok, so a 2 column flooding around 3kw is like my 1/2 liebig choking at 1.5kw when i tried to us it as a verticle reflux condenser, right? Too much liquid
    Message 1 of 13 , Oct 31, 2006
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      ok, so a 2" column "flooding" around 3kw is like my 1/2"
      liebig "choking" at 1.5kw when i tried to us it as a verticle reflux
      condenser, right? Too much liquid being condensed and staying in the
      packing, which would impeed the vapor flow, and preasurize the still,
      if i understand correctly. Which brings up another question. If your
      info is correct, that a 2" column will flood if given a heat input
      over 2-3kw, why is it that the PDA-2 will handle a max power input of
      5.5kw? If i remember correctly, it is constucted with 2" pipe.

      Once again, to make sure that i get the entirely clear definition of
      HETP, the HETP is the height of packing that it takes to equal one
      theoretical plate for the given tamperature, for that type of
      packing? So, lets say, if the HETP for my still and its packing was 8
      inches for each plate, if i increased my heat input, it might require
      12 inches for each plate. I know that the measurements are not
      correct, i am just wondering if i have the general idea down.

      I do wonder, how does one aquire this knowledge? Does it take years
      of engineering school, or is it just a matter of knowing the right
      equations? I'm sorry if i am really slow with catching on to some of
      the theory here, but thats why i'm in the "new distillers" forum, and
      i really appreciate all of your help. Someday, i want you all to be
      able to look back at me and say, "my god, what have we done!"

      -Tyler
    • Harry
      ... reflux ... the ... still, ... your ... of ... ...........It s not 2 pipe. I can t remember which it is, either it s 3 or 4 , but definitely not 2 . ...
      Message 2 of 13 , Nov 1, 2006
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        --- In new_distillers@yahoogroups.com, "tyler_97355" <kd7enm@...>
        wrote:
        >
        > ok, so a 2" column "flooding" around 3kw is like my 1/2"
        > liebig "choking" at 1.5kw when i tried to us it as a verticle
        reflux
        > condenser, right? Too much liquid being condensed and staying in
        the
        > packing, which would impeed the vapor flow, and preasurize the
        still,
        > if i understand correctly. Which brings up another question. If
        your
        > info is correct, that a 2" column will flood if given a heat input
        > over 2-3kw, why is it that the PDA-2 will handle a max power input
        of
        > 5.5kw? If i remember correctly, it is constucted with 2" pipe.





        ...........It's not 2" pipe. I can't remember which it is, either
        it's 3" or 4", but definitely not 2".



        >
        > Once again, to make sure that i get the entirely clear definition
        of
        > HETP, the HETP is the height of packing that it takes to equal one
        > theoretical plate for the given tamperature, for that type of
        > packing?




        .............AND that particular heat input.


        So, lets say, if the HETP for my still and its packing was 8
        > inches for each plate, if i increased my heat input, it might
        require
        > 12 inches for each plate.


        .......Yes.


        I know that the measurements are not
        > correct, i am just wondering if i have the general idea down.


        ..Yes.



        >
        > I do wonder, how does one aquire this knowledge? Does it take
        years
        > of engineering school,





        ......The discipline is known as "Chemical Engineering" ChE for
        short.


        or is it just a matter of knowing the right
        > equations?



        ........ You can be 'self-taught' if you have a capacity to learn.
        The information is available in any library and in many places on
        the internet. I am self taught when it comes to physics,
        electrical, mechanical & chemical engineering. My degrees are in
        computing and Information Technology. But that doesn't stop me from
        acquiring the knowledge I need to assist me in my chosen hobby.
        Bottom line is, if you have a desire to learn, and a capable brain,
        then the sky's the limit. Age is no barrier.

        Side note for Riku: There are formulae for working out HETP.
        They're called McCabe-Theile Diagrams, phase diagrams, and for the
        lazy ones, computer simulations such as HYSIS . But you need to get
        a lot more theory & prac under your belt (distillation-wise) before
        you tackle that level. The 'net is your fingertip library. ;-)


        I'm sorry if i am really slow with catching on to some of
        > the theory here, but thats why i'm in the "new distillers" forum,
        and
        > i really appreciate all of your help.


        .......Look on Tony's homedistiller.org homesite (homepage of this
        group). That will give you a jump-start to the theory.



        Someday, i want you all to be
        > able to look back at me and say, "my god, what have we done!"
        >
        > -Tyler
        >


        Slainte!
        regards Harry
      • gff_stwrt
        ... snip ... snip ... Hi, tyler, One of the best ways of learning is to ask the right questions of the right people. This is really interesting stuff, and
        Message 3 of 13 , Nov 1, 2006
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          --- In new_distillers@yahoogroups.com, "tyler_97355" <kd7enm@...> wrote:
          >
          > ok, so a 2" column "flooding" around 3kw is like my 1/2"
          > liebig "choking" at 1.5kw when i tried to us it as a verticle reflux

          snip
          >
          > I do wonder, how does one aquire this knowledge? >
          snip
          > -Tyler
          >

          Hi, tyler,
          One of the best ways of learning is to ask the right questions of the
          right people.

          This is really interesting stuff, and thanks to you and the people who
          have replied to your questions we are getting a different perspective
          on theory and that's really good, too.
          Thanks

          The Baker
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