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Small whiskey mash

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  • tyler_97355
    I finally broke down and bought some 6 row malted barley so i can make a true mash. However, all of the recipes that i am finding are for big 30 gallon
    Message 1 of 3 , Oct 10, 2006
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      I finally broke down and bought some 6 row malted barley so i can make
      a true mash. However, all of the recipes that i am finding are for big
      30 gallon batches. I'm looking to ferment on the grain to a final
      volume of 6-7 gallons, which i'm guessing would leave me with about 5
      gallons of liquid to distill. I was thinking (sorry for the english
      measurements) 10 cups of cracked corn, 3 cups of rye flour, and 4 cups
      of malted barley. Does that sound about right? I also wonder, when
      measuring the cracked corn, should i go by dried volume, or hydrated
      volume? I also don't have a scale, so i can't really go by weight. Help
      me please!

      -Tyler
    • Tony Turner
      Tyler, as a general rule three cups of cracked corn is equal to one pound (at least every time I ve measures it it was). If it is a tiny bit over or under it
      Message 2 of 3 , Oct 11, 2006
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        Tyler, as a general rule three cups of cracked corn is equal to one pound (at least every time I've measures it it was). If it is a tiny bit over or under it won't hurt. I measure with the cup and then weigh the total and I'm within an once or two on every mash I've made like that.

        As for the Rye flour ---- DON"T!!!!!! I've made two 5 gallon mashes with corn, rye flour and barley malt and they suck!!!!!!!! The rye flour will NEVER settle out. Now ever is a long time but I've waited a week with it in the frig and it NEVER cleared. It's the only mash that I have not been able to clear. You can use a clearing agent i guess but I don't just happen to have any around the house so I have not tried it. The cloudy mash has a "tails" taste coming out of the still and so far no amount of oaking has helped any. Use cracked rye or whole rye and run away from the rye flour.

        A mash that will work is 75-15-10 or for a 5 gallon total volume 7.5lb corn, 1.5lb of Rye and 1lb of barley malt. Top up to 5 gallons. Make sure you boil the cracked corn and rye for about an hour (it'll be a thick soup and the corn will be soft). Allow it to cool down to 150F and stir in the barley malt. Cover well to insulate (I use a igloo cooler as a mash tun) and allow to sit for at least 90 minutes but I let it sit for a few hours. That will convert the starch in the corn and rye to sugars. Top up to 5 gallons and pitch your yeast when the temp is 80F or below but not cold.

        This recipe will work and makes a nice whiskey. The SG is lower than I was use to seeing when I was adding sugar but the flavor is better. I guess if you have a bigger fermenter you can up the grains and get the SG up but all I have is 5 gallon buckets and 1 seven gallon fermenter so I use what I have.

        Good luck,
        Tony T

        tyler_97355 <kd7enm@...> wrote: I finally broke down and bought some 6 row malted barley so i can make
        a true mash. However, all of the recipes that i am finding are for big
        30 gallon batches. I'm looking to ferment on the grain to a final
        volume of 6-7 gallons, which i'm guessing would leave me with about 5
        gallons of liquid to distill. I was thinking (sorry for the english
        measurements) 10 cups of cracked corn, 3 cups of rye flour, and 4 cups
        of malted barley. Does that sound about right? I also wonder, when
        measuring the cracked corn, should i go by dried volume, or hydrated
        volume? I also don't have a scale, so i can't really go by weight. Help
        me please!

        -Tyler








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      • r_g_wilson2
        Hi Tyler, I always measure the grains by weight, but I agree with Tony that my measurement of flaked corn comes out to about 3cups per pound. I don t know
        Message 3 of 3 , Oct 11, 2006
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          Hi Tyler,

          I always measure the grains by weight, but I agree with Tony that my
          measurement of flaked corn comes out to about 3cups per pound. I
          don't know about the flour, but I am sure it will be much less than
          3 cups/pound. Listed below is a reference to a post I used when
          getting started and how I used it to make my bourbon. You might
          want to consider switching from using flour to a flaked grain. I
          think you will find it much easier.

          I'm on my eighth bourbon batch now, and I have modeled my recipes
          and process after this post from the Distiller's forum :

          http://groups.yahoo.com/group/Distillers/message/19249

          I'm on my second sack of 50# of Flaked corn from the feed store.
          But mine was just $4.80 per sack! I would also highly suggest the
          use of flaked (or Rolled) Rye or Wheat. By using these "flaked"
          products, which have already undergone gelatinization in their
          production, you DO NOT have to boil the grains. This saves a lot of
          time and hassle. The Flaked Rye and Flaked Wheat I purchase at a
          health food store here in the states (Vitamin Cottage). Cost :
          about $0.45 per pound. So compared to the Flaked Corn, this stuff
          is expensive!! :^)

          My adjustments to Paul's recipe/process:
          1. For my equipment/process, I upped the total pounds of grain from
          10 to 14. This allows me to achieve a starting gravity of 1.070.
          2. I use 20L of water with this 14# of grain. If I had a bigger
          mash kettle, I would up the water to 25L. The reason why is that
          this mash can get VERY thick and difficult to stir, especially with
          Rye (Flaked Wheat is not nearly as "gummy"). But I can still manage
          to stir it without breaking my wooden mash paddle :)
          3. I throw in the malted barley when the temperature is about 153F.
          After stirring in barley the mash settles out to about 148F. One
          note about the "crushed" barley : when I brew beer, I am very
          careful about how I "crush" the barley. But with a whiskey mash, I
          grind the malted barley fairly fine. As I stir the crushed malted
          barley in the mash, I am still amazed at how fast the enzymes start
          working to "loosen" up the mash. You will notice that the effort to
          stir rapidly gets much easier.
          4. I usually just let the mash set overnight at this temperature to
          get a full starch conversion. I do not stir again after adding the
          malted barley since I do not want the temperature to drop. Another
          note here : For years I have used an insulated box for mashing with
          my beer brewing. I built this box out of insulated material from a
          home-building supply store (Home Depot here in the states). Mine is
          a very dense styrofoam-like product that I simply cut to the size of
          my mash kettle, and then glued it together. I think I put it
          together probably 12 years ago and it hasn't fallen apart yet! But
          it does a great job of holding my mash a temperature for hours and
          hours! I would HIGHLY recommend building and using one. Sure was
          cheap.
          5. Paul's recipe above calls for 1/3 cup of either baker's yeast or
          distiller's yeast. I have been using a variety of beer yeasts, and
          my last two batches I have tried distiller's yeast. But 1/3 cup
          seems like way overkill to me. I used 3 Tablespoons of the
          distiller's yeast and it fermented quickly and vigorously.

          That's about it. Good luck,

          -rgw

          --- In new_distillers@yahoogroups.com, "tyler_97355" <kd7enm@...>
          wrote:
          >
          > I finally broke down and bought some 6 row malted barley so i can
          make
          > a true mash. However, all of the recipes that i am finding are for
          big
          > 30 gallon batches. I'm looking to ferment on the grain to a final
          > volume of 6-7 gallons, which i'm guessing would leave me with
          about 5
          > gallons of liquid to distill. I was thinking (sorry for the
          english
          > measurements) 10 cups of cracked corn, 3 cups of rye flour, and 4
          cups
          > of malted barley. Does that sound about right? I also wonder, when
          > measuring the cracked corn, should i go by dried volume, or
          hydrated
          > volume? I also don't have a scale, so i can't really go by weight.
          Help
          > me please!
          >
          > -Tyler
          >
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