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First true mash

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  • tyler_97355
    I ve been making whisky for a while by just making a sugar wash and adding cracked corn for flavor. Well i finally broke down and travelled all the way to the
    Message 1 of 8 , Sep 29, 2006
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      I've been making whisky for a while by just making a sugar wash and
      adding cracked corn for flavor. Well i finally broke down and travelled
      all the way to the homebrew store to pick up some malted barley. I'm
      going to try to make a mash with 60% cracked corn, 20% rye flour, and
      20% 6 row malted barley. Still trying to figure out how much grains i
      need for a 6-7 gallon mash. I was wondering, why do you have to "mash
      off"? What is the point of raising the temperature and killing the
      enzymes after an hour? Why not just let it cool and ferment on the
      grain?

      -Tyler
    • sonum norbu
      Good question, tyler. I eagerly await answers. I m distilling my first attempt at all grain as we speak, and am quite sure it will finish up in the Evil
      Message 2 of 8 , Sep 29, 2006
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        Good question, tyler. I eagerly await answers. I'm distilling my first
        attempt at all grain as we speak, and am quite sure it will finish up in
        the 'Evil Spirits' bottle. I'll let you know what it's like Don. thanks
        for your help :) blanikdog



        ----- Original Message -----
        From: "tyler_97355"
        To: new_distillers@yahoogroups.com
        Subject: [new_distillers] First true mash
        Date: Fri, 29 Sep 2006 18:43:36 -0000

        I've been making whisky for a while by just making a sugar wash and
        adding cracked corn for flavor. Well i finally broke down and
        travelled
        all the way to the homebrew store to pick up some malted barley. I'm
        going to try to make a mash with 60% cracked corn, 20% rye flour, and
        20% 6 row malted barley. Still trying to figure out how much grains i
        need for a 6-7 gallon mash. I was wondering, why do you have to "mash
        off"? What is the point of raising the temperature and killing the
        enzymes after an hour? Why not just let it cool and ferment on the
        grain?

        -Tyler





        NORMALITY IS NOTHING TO ASPIRE TOWARDS!!!

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      • donald holcombe
        Rule of Thumb is 1.5-2 quarts of 170 F water per pound of grain. 24 Qts = 12-16Lbs of grain. The grain with malt is raised to 150F to let the enzymes work at
        Message 3 of 8 , Sep 29, 2006
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          Rule of Thumb is 1.5-2 quarts of 170 F water per pound of grain. 24 Qts = 12-16Lbs of grain. The grain with malt is raised to 150F to let the enzymes work at there best speed. Lower temp and the speed of mashing is slower. Above 170F and you leach too much tannins from the grain and kill the enzymes. I heat my mash to 150F and wrap a towel around it and let it set overnight.When it cools below 85F I pitch the yeast and let the yeast do there thing.Grain and all. 2 row barley may be better. Less protien to cause foam. I use 1.5 Qts per lb of grain. when the mash is finish I drop the cooled water from 3-4 feet high into the mash to put some O2 in the mashTo come up to 2Qts per lb. Later

          tyler_97355 <kd7enm@...> wrote: I've been making whisky for a while by just making a sugar wash and
          adding cracked corn for flavor. Well i finally broke down and travelled
          all the way to the homebrew store to pick up some malted barley. I'm
          going to try to make a mash with 60% cracked corn, 20% rye flour, and
          20% 6 row malted barley. Still trying to figure out how much grains i
          need for a 6-7 gallon mash. I was wondering, why do you have to "mash
          off"? What is the point of raising the temperature and killing the
          enzymes after an hour? Why not just let it cool and ferment on the
          grain?

          -Tyler






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        • donald holcombe
          Let the grains sour a few days then throw more sugar and water in it.Watch it GO! sonum norbu wrote: Good question, tyler. I
          Message 4 of 8 , Sep 29, 2006
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            Let the grains sour a few days then throw more sugar and water in it.Watch it GO!

            sonum norbu <blanik@...> wrote: Good question, tyler. I eagerly await answers. I'm distilling my first
            attempt at all grain as we speak, and am quite sure it will finish up in
            the 'Evil Spirits' bottle. I'll let you know what it's like Don. thanks
            for your help :) blanikdog

            ----- Original Message -----
            From: "tyler_97355"
            To: new_distillers@yahoogroups.com
            Subject: [new_distillers] First true mash
            Date: Fri, 29 Sep 2006 18:43:36 -0000

            I've been making whisky for a while by just making a sugar wash and
            adding cracked corn for flavor. Well i finally broke down and
            travelled
            all the way to the homebrew store to pick up some malted barley. I'm
            going to try to make a mash with 60% cracked corn, 20% rye flour, and
            20% 6 row malted barley. Still trying to figure out how much grains i
            need for a 6-7 gallon mash. I was wondering, why do you have to "mash
            off"? What is the point of raising the temperature and killing the
            enzymes after an hour? Why not just let it cool and ferment on the
            grain?

            -Tyler

            NORMALITY IS NOTHING TO ASPIRE TOWARDS!!!

            My SOARING, SAILING AND SKYDIVING web page
            http://www.angelfire.com/fl2/cloudbase/
            #american-pie on Starchat

            --
            _______________________________________________
            Surf the Web in a faster, safer and easier way:
            Download Opera 9 at http://www.opera.com

            Powered by Outblaze

            [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]






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          • sonum norbu
            Hi Don, You were right. My all grain mash was a total disaster!!! When distilling I got a constant flow of product which was a disgusting milky green,
            Message 5 of 8 , Sep 29, 2006
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              Hi Don, You were right. My all grain mash was a total disaster!!! When
              distilling I got a constant flow of product which was a disgusting milky
              green, cloudy, copper tasting, .....words fail me....mess. It seems that
              I managed to produce five gallons of very poor quality vinegar. I guess
              that the still needed a good clean out anyway. lol

              Ah well, back to the drawing board. Meanwhile I'll get a molasses wash
              going :) Blanikdog

              ----- Original Message -----
              From: "sonum norbu"
              To: new_distillers@yahoogroups.com
              Subject: Re: [new_distillers] First true mash
              Date: Sat, 30 Sep 2006 00:07:03 +0000

              Good question, tyler. I eagerly await answers. I'm distilling my
              first
              attempt at all grain as we speak, and am quite sure it will finish up
              in
              the 'Evil Spirits' bottle. I'll let you know what it's like Don.
              thanks
              for your help :) blanikdog

              ----- Original Message -----
              From: "tyler_97355"
              To: new_distillers@yahoogroups.com
              Subject: [new_distillers] First true mash
              Date: Fri, 29 Sep 2006 18:43:36 -0000

              I've been making whisky for a while by just making a sugar wash and
              adding cracked corn for flavor. Well i finally broke down and
              travelled
              all the way to the homebrew store to pick up some malted barley. I'm
              going to try to make a mash with 60% cracked corn, 20% rye flour, and
              20% 6 row malted barley. Still trying to figure out how much grains i
              need for a 6-7 gallon mash. I was wondering, why do you have to "mash
              off"? What is the point of raising the temperature and killing the
              enzymes after an hour? Why not just let it cool and ferment on the
              grain?

              -Tyler

              NORMALITY IS NOTHING TO ASPIRE TOWARDS!!!

              My SOARING, SAILING AND SKYDIVING web page
              http://www.angelfire.com/fl2/cloudbase/
              #american-pie on Starchat

              --
              _______________________________________________
              Surf the Web in a faster, safer and easier way:
              Download Opera 9 at http://www.opera.com

              Powered by Outblaze

              [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]





              NORMALITY IS NOTHING TO ASPIRE TOWARDS!!!

              My SOARING, SAILING AND SKYDIVING web page
              http://www.angelfire.com/fl2/cloudbase/
              #american-pie on Starchat

              --
              _______________________________________________
              Surf the Web in a faster, safer and easier way:
              Download Opera 9 at http://www.opera.com

              Powered by Outblaze


              [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
            • tyler_97355
              I m still waiting for an answer on the whole mash off question. If the enzymes stop working once the temperature drops, why do i need to heat up the mash again
              Message 6 of 8 , Oct 1, 2006
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                I'm still waiting for an answer on the whole mash off question. If the
                enzymes stop working once the temperature drops, why do i need to heat
                up the mash again to kill the enzymes? If i don't kill the enzymes,
                there may be a snowballs chance in hell that the enzymes might still
                convert a little bit more starch while it is fermenting. But i could be
                wrong.

                -Tyler
              • Harry
                ... the ... heat ... To thin the mash and allow easier sparging. Not an essential step in distilling, but crucial in beer making as enzymes can impart
                Message 7 of 8 , Oct 1, 2006
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                  --- In new_distillers@yahoogroups.com, "tyler_97355" <kd7enm@...>
                  wrote:
                  >
                  > I'm still waiting for an answer on the whole mash off question. If
                  the
                  > enzymes stop working once the temperature drops, why do i need to
                  heat
                  > up the mash again to kill the enzymes?




                  To thin the mash and allow easier sparging.

                  Not an essential step in distilling, but crucial in beer making as
                  enzymes can impart undesirable flavours during the fermentation. Beer
                  for 'beer' and beer for 'spirits' are two different animals in some
                  respects.

                  Good site with pics...
                  http://www.beerdude.com/howto_brew_allgrain.shtml

                  Other useful sites...

                  http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mashing

                  http://hypertextbook.com/facts/2005/OrinZahra.shtml

                  http://www.howtobrew.com/section3/



                  Slainte!
                  regards Harry
                • donald holcombe
                  Some enzymes work at lower temps, some at higher. 150 F is a compromise . Killing the enzymes with high temps is for BEER , not spirits. tyler_97355
                  Message 8 of 8 , Oct 1, 2006
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                    Some enzymes work at lower temps, some at higher. 150 F is a compromise . Killing the enzymes with high temps is for BEER , not spirits.

                    tyler_97355 <kd7enm@...> wrote: I'm still waiting for an answer on the whole mash off question. If the
                    enzymes stop working once the temperature drops, why do i need to heat
                    up the mash again to kill the enzymes? If i don't kill the enzymes,
                    there may be a snowballs chance in hell that the enzymes might still
                    convert a little bit more starch while it is fermenting. But i could be
                    wrong.

                    -Tyler






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