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Re: [new_distillers] Re: Baker's Yeast, Whiskey yeast, Distiller's yeast, Brewery yeast?

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  • Robert Thomas
    ... it certainly can. ymmv. It really depends on the amount of yeast, and the delicacy (or not) of your distillate s flavour. ... Marketing speak would
    Message 1 of 7 , Aug 30, 2006
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      --- r_g_wilson2 <rolson2@...> wrote:

      > Hi MA, Rob,
      >
      > Thanks for your insights to a distilling newbie :)
      >
      > Rob, you mention using a fining agent to settle out the Baker's
      > yeast. I know doing this clarification step makes sense for making
      > beer (although I have never used it myself in brewing). Why do this
      > step for distilling? Does boiling the yeast in the still cause off-
      > flavours to come across in the distilate?

      it certainly can. ymmv. It really depends on the amount of yeast, and
      the delicacy (or not) of your distillate's flavour.

      <snip>

      >
      > What is the distinction between a distiller's yeast and a "Whiskey"
      > yeast? Is a distiller's yeast targeted primarly for sugar washes?
      > I couldn't find the answer to these questions digging through the
      > archives, the Internet, or the homedistllation.org site.

      Marketing speak would be my guess. Although some distillers yeast sold
      to amateurs like us is specialised for (say) cleanness, so potstillers
      can get purities nearer to column stillers. Always check the labels,
      horse for courses.

      >
      > So what I am trying to achieve is somthing in the ballpark of a
      > commerical bourbon, like Maker's Mark or Austin's Wild Turkey. So
      > my quesiton is does anyone know what category(s) of yeast these
      > commerical bourbon distiller's use? By category, I mean is it a
      > distiller's yeast, whiskey yeast, brewery yeast, baker's yeast, wine
      > yeast, mead yeast, etc. WIth so many categories to choose from, I
      > just want to get close on the first go and then experiment with
      > different brands/types within that category of yeast. For example,
      > Harry's description of using a combination of baker's yeast/brewing
      > yeast for the scotch clone was very helpful, without having to give
      > a specific strain of brewing yeast. I'm looking for something
      > similar for a bourbon.

      I'm no bourbon specialist (drinking or distilling) so I'll pass that
      on, with just a question thrown in: "sour mash?".

      cheers,
      rob.

      Cheers,
      Rob.

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    • abbababbaccc
      ... making ... this ... off- ... and ... Actually the problem is yeast cells getting burned/scorched during distillation. Whether this happens or not depends
      Message 2 of 7 , Aug 31, 2006
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        --- In new_distillers@yahoogroups.com, Robert Thomas
        <whosbrewing@...> wrote:
        >
        >
        >
        > --- r_g_wilson2 <rolson2@...> wrote:
        >
        > > Hi MA, Rob,
        > >
        > > Thanks for your insights to a distilling newbie :)
        > >
        > > Rob, you mention using a fining agent to settle out the Baker's
        > > yeast. I know doing this clarification step makes sense for
        making
        > > beer (although I have never used it myself in brewing). Why do
        this
        > > step for distilling? Does boiling the yeast in the still cause
        off-
        > > flavours to come across in the distilate?
        >
        > it certainly can. ymmv. It really depends on the amount of yeast,
        and
        > the delicacy (or not) of your distillate's flavour.
        >

        Actually the problem is yeast cells getting burned/scorched during
        distillation. Whether this happens or not depends on the speed of
        distillation and the amount of yeast cells circulating in the mash.
        Thus clarifying the mash and/or doing a quick stripping run are
        beneficial to the flavor of your distillate.

        Cheers, Riku
      • r_g_wilson2
        ... that ... Hi Rob, I m certainly no bourbon expert either, but I do love to sip a fine bourbon on my porch at the end of a summer day! Sour Mash? ? Well,
        Message 3 of 7 , Aug 31, 2006
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          --- In new_distillers@yahoogroups.com, Robert Thomas
          <whosbrewing@...> wrote:
          >
          > <snipety do-dah>
          >
          > I'm no bourbon specialist (drinking or distilling) so I'll pass
          that
          > on, with just a question thrown in: "sour mash?".
          >
          > Cheers,
          > Rob.
          >

          Hi Rob,

          I'm certainly no bourbon expert either, but I do love to sip a fine
          bourbon on my porch at the end of a summer day!

          "Sour Mash?" ? Well, yes and no. This is the normal procedure used
          for all american straight bourbon. As you probably know, all this
          means is adding the "backset" (or "setback") from the end of a
          distillation, which is acidic, to the mash of the next batch to
          adjust the PH into the desired range. So in a commercial continuous
          operation, it is quite convienent and economical. That's about it.
          ANy other benefits, in my opinion, are negligible and are the
          imagination of the marketing departments :) But "Sour Mash" sure is
          a great advertising term, isn't it !?

          So from my hobbyist standpoint, I don't have a continous operation
          going on (no available "backset") and it is more convient for me to
          adjust the mash PH in a different way. From my brewing background,
          I have to sometimes adjust the mash PH down due to my water supply.
          So for a bourbon cereal mash, I can empoly that same technique to
          achieve the proper PH, which is all the "sour mash" does.

          --rgw
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