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Re: Peaches

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  • Harry
    Comments interspersed... ... ..................True (which also contain Cyanide) ..................Not true. Apricot pits, along with most stone fruits,
    Message 1 of 5 , Aug 4 1:46 AM
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      Comments interspersed...


      --- In new_distillers@yahoogroups.com, "Allan DeGroot"
      <adegroot@...> wrote:
      >
      > Now I'll disillusion you a bit, Amaretto? The italian
      > "Almond" liqueur? it isn't made from Almonds, it's made
      > from Apricot Pits

      ..................True

      (which also contain Cyanide)


      ..................Not true. Apricot pits, along with most stone
      fruits, contain amygdalin. This substance can be converted via
      hydrolysis into other compounds. One mole of amygdalin yields two
      moles of glucose, one mole of cyanide and one mole of benzaldehyde.
      Benzaldehyde is considered a positive aroma characteristic in stone
      fruit brandies. It is present in the late hearts and tails of the
      distillate due to the relatively high boiling point. The cyanide
      has a different aroma and taste (think bitter almonds).

      Addition of silver nitrate in the amount of 10 g per 100 litres
      distillate causes hydrogen cyanide to precipitate as insoluble
      silver cyanide. After filtration of the precipitation the
      distillate can be distilled again.




      >
      > The thing is that cyanide isn't all that concentrated in the pits
      > and doesn't distill out.

      .................Again not true. See previous comment about whether
      it's present as cyanide or not. As for not distilling out, not
      true. Cyanide is volatile. Volatility means that it WILL distill
      out, just like volatile ethanol. See previous comment on how to
      remove it before distillation.

      >
      > Cherry pits also have cyanide and many liqueur reciepes for Cherry
      > Liqueur call for cracking the pits....


      ................True for cracking. The usual amount is no greater
      than 5% of the stones.


      >
      > during the fermentation process Cyanide is simply another
      > source of Nitrogen to the yeast.



      ...............While this may be true for certain microbes...

      [source] Harris, R., Knowles, C.J. : Isolation and Growth of a
      Pseudomonas Species that UtilizesCyanide as a Source of Nitrogen,
      Journal of General Microbiology, 1983, 129, p. 1005-1011. ,

      ...I don't believe there are ANY strains of Saccharomyces Cerevisiae
      (brewers/distillers yeasts) that have that capability. However I am
      willing to stand corrected if you can cite a source of refute.


      >
      > And in making Liqueur Cyanide isn't sufficiently soluble
      > in ethanol to make the resulting beverage sufficiently poisonous.


      ................This I agree with.


      >
      > If you want to worry about cyanide carefully read the assay
      information
      > on your water softener salt... Most softener salt contains cyanide
      >
      > Me thinks you worry too much.


      ..............Again I concur. There's far too much panic about
      cyanide AND methanol. Probably (assuredly) promoted and condoned by
      those with a vested interest in spreading this crap (like the booze
      cartels, & revenoors).


      Slainte!
      regards Harry
      Moderator
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