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Re: [new_distillers] Re: my project

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  • John Vandermeulen
    But, getting your friend to do the machining also allows him into the secret. An acquaintance of mine, living in the Valley , had to stop distilling because
    Message 1 of 17 , Dec 29, 2001
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      But, getting your friend to do the machining also allows him into the secret.
      An acquaintance of mine, living in "the Valley", had to stop distilling because
      the community was beginning to 'buzz' over his hobby. As it is, I am very leery
      about using this list, but even leerier about getting friends to do some work on
      the apparatus. Choose someone totally strange!
      John V

      jared wrote:

      > > The big
      > > advantage of getting a pro to help is thet they will have better and
      > bigger
      > > equipment than you, which will turn a difficult job at home, into a few
      > > minuites for a skilled tradesman, and the results will be much more
      > > satisfactory as well.
      > > John
      >
      > That's my thoughts as well - if I have a friend that's a machinist & does
      > this kind of stuff for a living, he can make my life waaaaay easier. plus it
      > looks more professional & stands a better chance of lasting...
      >
      > jared
      >
      > _________________________________________________________
      >
      > Do You Yahoo!?
      >
      > Get your free @... address at http://mail.yahoo.com
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      >
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      > new_distillers-unsubscribe@onelist.com
      >
      >
      >
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    • John Jackson
      The hand tool you are referring to is not really designed for expanding exhaust tubing, rather it is to straighten out collapsed sections of tube that had
      Message 2 of 17 , Dec 29, 2001
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        The hand tool you are referring to is not really designed for expanding
        exhaust tubing, rather it is to straighten out collapsed sections of tube
        that had previously been expanded in a hydraulic tube bender used by muffler
        shops, While it may just do the job on exhaust tube it certainly won't touch
        stainless or hardened copper. The grade of mild steel tube used in automotive
        exhaust systems has lead in it to make it easier to bend and be expanded. The
        band clamps you refer to are not used with expanded joints, they are used for
        straight butt joints and are far from water tight.
        The subject of joining various bits of tube together is a fairly common one
        on this list, and if I may make a few suggestions on this common problem:
        there is a point when the oft used phrase "don't try this at home kids"
        really is applicable here. I know that part of the fun in home distilling is
        to be able to say you "made it yourself", but there are times when
        professional help is the way to go. I think you would be surprised to find
        that small welding jobs can be done for remarkably little money and even more
        likely, a quantity of alcoholic beverages will work as currency. More often
        than not, a small welding shop will not care what you are making, as you are
        simply going to ask for some bits of metal to be joined together. When I
        started on my still project, any time I had a question I would simply say
        "I'm making a still". Universally, everyone had helpful suggestions and
        usually added stories of someone they knew that had a still... The big
        advantage of getting a pro to help is thet they will have better and bigger
        equipment than you, which will turn a difficult job at home, into a few
        minuites for a skilled tradesman, and the results will be much more
        satisfactory as well.
        John

        cornfed62 wrote:

        > For another idea on a still column that breaks down in sections: Try
        > going to a automotive parts supply house and find a exhaust tubing
        > expander. It is a specialty hand tool that has a series of tapered
        > sections arranged around two wedge pieces that are threaded for a
        > through bolt. The tool is placed inside of the tubing. As you tighten
        > the bolt, the wedges expand the tapered sections and the tubing to
        > the size that you need. You can go too far and split the sidewall
        > out. You could expand one side of each connection and then you
        > would have a simple slip joint at each section end. You could use
        > the flour water solution to seal each joint or you could use wrap
        > around exhaust clamps that are solid stainless steel sheeting and
        > come in widths from 1 inch to 6 inches. These are used for large
        > diesel engine exhaust connections.
      • jared
        ... _________________________________________________________ Do You Yahoo!? Get your free @yahoo.com address at http://mail.yahoo.com
        Message 3 of 17 , Dec 29, 2001
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          > The big
          > advantage of getting a pro to help is thet they will have better and
          bigger
          > equipment than you, which will turn a difficult job at home, into a few
          > minuites for a skilled tradesman, and the results will be much more
          > satisfactory as well.
          > John


          That's my thoughts as well - if I have a friend that's a machinist & does
          this kind of stuff for a living, he can make my life waaaaay easier. plus it
          looks more professional & stands a better chance of lasting...

          jared


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        • jared
          It s only people I can trust to keep their mouths shut that I ve let in to my plans. and they only know because I need them for their talents in welding /
          Message 4 of 17 , Dec 29, 2001
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            It's only people I can trust to keep their mouths shut that I've let in to
            my plans. and they only know because I need them for their talents in
            welding / machining / part sourcing. As it is I'm State/Province hopping for
            parts, so all should be well.

            and yep - somewhat leery of a public list as well, but there's too much
            knowledge here not to...

            jared


            ----- Original Message -----
            From: "John Vandermeulen" <vandermeulen@...>
            To: <new_distillers@yahoogroups.com>
            Sent: Saturday, December 29, 2001 10:22 AM
            Subject: Re: [new_distillers] Re: my project


            > But, getting your friend to do the machining also allows him into the
            secret.
            > An acquaintance of mine, living in "the Valley", had to stop distilling
            because
            > the community was beginning to 'buzz' over his hobby. As it is, I am very
            leery
            > about using this list, but even leerier about getting friends to do some
            work on
            > the apparatus. Choose someone totally strange!
            > John V
            >
            > jared wrote:
            >
            > > > The big
            > > > advantage of getting a pro to help is thet they will have better and
            > > bigger
            > > > equipment than you, which will turn a difficult job at home, into a
            few
            > > > minuites for a skilled tradesman, and the results will be much more
            > > > satisfactory as well.
            > > > John
            > >
            > > That's my thoughts as well - if I have a friend that's a machinist &
            does
            > > this kind of stuff for a living, he can make my life waaaaay easier.
            plus it
            > > looks more professional & stands a better chance of lasting...
            > >
            > > jared
            > >
            > > _________________________________________________________
            > >
            > > Do You Yahoo!?
            > >
            > > Get your free @... address at http://mail.yahoo.com
            > >
            > >
            > > To unsubscribe from this group, send an email to:
            > > new_distillers-unsubscribe@onelist.com
            > >
            > >
            > >
            > > Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to
            http://docs.yahoo.com/info/terms/
            >
            >
            >
            >
            >
            > To unsubscribe from this group, send an email to:
            > new_distillers-unsubscribe@onelist.com
            >
            >
            >
            > Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to http://docs.yahoo.com/info/terms/
            >


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          • John Vandermeulen
            Hello Robert, when it comes to stainless, you might want to talk to Jackson in Winnipeg (?), Canada. He is in the stainless pipe etc. business. You can
            Message 5 of 17 , Dec 30, 2001
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              Hello Robert,
              when it comes to stainless, you might want to talk to "Jackson" in Winnipeg (?),
              Canada. He is in the stainless pipe etc. business. You can find him in the
              archives.
              John V

              Robert N wrote:

              > Hi folks, just want to add my 2 cents worth to this topic, if I may?
              > I too am about to construct the modified N/S still. At present I have a
              > Still Spirits, "super reflux model". I will be using the 50Lt beer keg etc
              > and a stainless 50mm pipe system. What I have seen used by others is
              > stainless coupling's that have a male/female thread like a nut and bolt,
              > just hollow, the nut actually slips over the pipe. These are purpose built,
              > to be welded onto the stainless pipe and are close to the same internal size
              > as the pipe. They probably end up with a 1mm gap inside when the nut is
              > tightened. As the nut section is hexagonal it can be tightened with a
              > wrench. They also make the male threaded sections to take neoprene seals on
              > the bearing surface to stop leaks. I visited a fellow distiller who used a
              > 50Lt keg and he makes a 100mm diameter still for sale, what he did was use a
              > 100mm fitting at the keg end, which was welded into place on the top of the
              > keg. This stopped the leaks and made it easy to get his hand inside to fit
              > the elements and clean out the keg etc. He used a 100mm SS pipe, although
              > mine will be 50mm, I'll just make a reducing section above this 100mm SS
              > fitting, may just use another coupling here just depends on the cost of
              > fittings. At the other end of my column, I intend to have another 50mm
              > coupling that will join the N/S head onto the column. Similar to the way
              > Matt has shown in his photos.
              >
              > Carbon filter
              > Now with the "column" from above, I am also going to join another coupling
              > with a piece of 100mm pipe approximately 300mm in length. This will screw
              > onto the bottom end of this "column", which I will now upturn to use as my
              > carbon filter. Onto the now bottom other end, I will screw another female
              > coupling nut that has a ball tap welded in place. This column I can then
              > fill with activated carbon and use the 100mm x 300mm pipe section as a
              > reservoir for the unfiltered spirit. This is hung on the wall and allowed to
              > drip into a large collection container. This way I use the 50mmSS pipe for
              > both the refractionating column and carbon filter.
              >
              > I agree with John below about the small welding shop. If you are going down
              > the Stainless steel road, then get it welded by a pro, you won't be sorry. I
              > used to work in machine shops, (Career change) My neighbour works as a
              > maintaince fitter in a margarine factory and they use 50mm stainless steel
              > pipe and these couplings everywhere in the factory:) just an idea on where
              > to start looking! I went over and saw Matt's copper N/S Still (as seen in
              > photos on Tony's web site) last weekend and it is a beauty, (Matt's on
              > holiday's at the moment) I was picking his brains about where he sourced the
              > pipe and fittings. Matt said that he went to a large plumbing supply shop
              > that allowed customers to wander around looking at the fittings and
              > couplings.
              >
              > There are several elements that determine where exactly you will site the
              > still when in use!
              > 1. Heating source, eg electricity or gas? Availability of a power outlet or
              > extension cord!
              > 2. The final assembled height of the still, will it be able to stand upright
              > inside your house/garage/flat, or will you have to use the man hole in the
              > ceiling to run the still or can you use it outside?
              > 3. The cooling water, a supply of cool water and the used coolant, a lot of
              > folks use the used cooling water to fill the pool or water the plants. I
              > personally have it connected to an irrigation system in the yard to water
              > the plants.
              > 4. How isolated your property, inside/outside! Or how paranoid you are about
              > a visit from the law!
              >
              > I now step down off my soapbox! Or was it a still I was standing on? :)
              >
              > Robert
              > +_+_+_+_+_+_+_+_+_+_+_+_+_+_+_+_+_+_+_+_+_+_+_
              > >The subject of joining various bits of tube together is a fairly common one
              > on this list, and if I may make a few >suggestions on this common problem:
              > there is a point when the oft used phrase "don't try this at home kids"
              > really is >applicable here. I know that part of the fun in home distilling
              > is to be able to say you "made it yourself", but there >are times when
              > professional help is the way to go. I think you would be surprised to find
              > that small welding jobs can be done for remarkably little money and even
              > more likely, a quantity of alcoholic beverages will work as currency. More
              > often
              > >than not, a small welding shop will not care what you are making, as you
              > are simply going to ask for some bits of metal >to be joined together. When
              > I started on my still project, any time I had a question I would simply say
              > "I'm making a >still". Universally, everyone had helpful suggestions and
              > usually added stories of someone they knew that had a still... >The big
              > advantage of getting a pro to help is that they will have better and bigger
              > equipment than you, which will turn a >difficult job at home, into a few
              > minutes for a skilled tradesman, and the results will be much more
              > satisfactory as >well.
              > >John
              > +_+_+_+_+_+_+_+_+_+_+_+_+_+_+_+_+_+_+_+_+_+_+_
              >
              > Have a great day!
              >
              > Robert
              >
              > _________________________________________________________
              >
              > Do You Yahoo!?
              >
              > Get your free @... address at http://mail.yahoo.com
              >
              >
              > To unsubscribe from this group, send an email to:
              > new_distillers-unsubscribe@onelist.com
              >
              >
              >
              > Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to http://docs.yahoo.com/info/terms/
            • John Vandermeulen
              Hello Robert, On reading thoroughly thru your posting, ignore my advice re Jackson. You don t need any. Happy New Year, John V
              Message 6 of 17 , Dec 30, 2001
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                Hello Robert,
                On reading thoroughly thru your posting, ignore my advice re Jackson. You don't
                need any. Happy New Year,
                John V

                Robert N wrote:

                > Hi folks, just want to add my 2 cents worth to this topic, if I may?
                > I too am about to construct the modified N/S still. At present I have a
                > Still Spirits, "super reflux model". I will be using the 50Lt beer keg etc
                > and a stainless 50mm pipe system. What I have seen used by others is
                > stainless coupling's that have a male/female thread like a nut and bolt,
                > just hollow, the nut actually slips over the pipe. These are purpose built,
                > to be welded onto the stainless pipe and are close to the same internal size
                > as the pipe. They probably end up with a 1mm gap inside when the nut is
                > tightened. As the nut section is hexagonal it can be tightened with a
                > wrench. They also make the male threaded sections to take neoprene seals on
                > the bearing surface to stop leaks. I visited a fellow distiller who used a
                > 50Lt keg and he makes a 100mm diameter still for sale, what he did was use a
                > 100mm fitting at the keg end, which was welded into place on the top of the
                > keg. This stopped the leaks and made it easy to get his hand inside to fit
                > the elements and clean out the keg etc. He used a 100mm SS pipe, although
                > mine will be 50mm, I'll just make a reducing section above this 100mm SS
                > fitting, may just use another coupling here just depends on the cost of
                > fittings. At the other end of my column, I intend to have another 50mm
                > coupling that will join the N/S head onto the column. Similar to the way
                > Matt has shown in his photos.
                >
                > Carbon filter
                > Now with the "column" from above, I am also going to join another coupling
                > with a piece of 100mm pipe approximately 300mm in length. This will screw
                > onto the bottom end of this "column", which I will now upturn to use as my
                > carbon filter. Onto the now bottom other end, I will screw another female
                > coupling nut that has a ball tap welded in place. This column I can then
                > fill with activated carbon and use the 100mm x 300mm pipe section as a
                > reservoir for the unfiltered spirit. This is hung on the wall and allowed to
                > drip into a large collection container. This way I use the 50mmSS pipe for
                > both the refractionating column and carbon filter.
                >
                > I agree with John below about the small welding shop. If you are going down
                > the Stainless steel road, then get it welded by a pro, you won't be sorry. I
                > used to work in machine shops, (Career change) My neighbour works as a
                > maintaince fitter in a margarine factory and they use 50mm stainless steel
                > pipe and these couplings everywhere in the factory:) just an idea on where
                > to start looking! I went over and saw Matt's copper N/S Still (as seen in
                > photos on Tony's web site) last weekend and it is a beauty, (Matt's on
                > holiday's at the moment) I was picking his brains about where he sourced the
                > pipe and fittings. Matt said that he went to a large plumbing supply shop
                > that allowed customers to wander around looking at the fittings and
                > couplings.
                >
                > There are several elements that determine where exactly you will site the
                > still when in use!
                > 1. Heating source, eg electricity or gas? Availability of a power outlet or
                > extension cord!
                > 2. The final assembled height of the still, will it be able to stand upright
                > inside your house/garage/flat, or will you have to use the man hole in the
                > ceiling to run the still or can you use it outside?
                > 3. The cooling water, a supply of cool water and the used coolant, a lot of
                > folks use the used cooling water to fill the pool or water the plants. I
                > personally have it connected to an irrigation system in the yard to water
                > the plants.
                > 4. How isolated your property, inside/outside! Or how paranoid you are about
                > a visit from the law!
                >
                > I now step down off my soapbox! Or was it a still I was standing on? :)
                >
                > Robert
                > +_+_+_+_+_+_+_+_+_+_+_+_+_+_+_+_+_+_+_+_+_+_+_
                > >The subject of joining various bits of tube together is a fairly common one
                > on this list, and if I may make a few >suggestions on this common problem:
                > there is a point when the oft used phrase "don't try this at home kids"
                > really is >applicable here. I know that part of the fun in home distilling
                > is to be able to say you "made it yourself", but there >are times when
                > professional help is the way to go. I think you would be surprised to find
                > that small welding jobs can be done for remarkably little money and even
                > more likely, a quantity of alcoholic beverages will work as currency. More
                > often
                > >than not, a small welding shop will not care what you are making, as you
                > are simply going to ask for some bits of metal >to be joined together. When
                > I started on my still project, any time I had a question I would simply say
                > "I'm making a >still". Universally, everyone had helpful suggestions and
                > usually added stories of someone they knew that had a still... >The big
                > advantage of getting a pro to help is that they will have better and bigger
                > equipment than you, which will turn a >difficult job at home, into a few
                > minutes for a skilled tradesman, and the results will be much more
                > satisfactory as >well.
                > >John
                > +_+_+_+_+_+_+_+_+_+_+_+_+_+_+_+_+_+_+_+_+_+_+_
                >
                > Have a great day!
                >
                > Robert
                >
                > _________________________________________________________
                >
                > Do You Yahoo!?
                >
                > Get your free @... address at http://mail.yahoo.com
                >
                >
                > To unsubscribe from this group, send an email to:
                > new_distillers-unsubscribe@onelist.com
                >
                >
                >
                > Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to http://docs.yahoo.com/info/terms/
              • Robert N
                Hi folks, just want to add my 2 cents worth to this topic, if I may? I too am about to construct the modified N/S still. At present I have a Still Spirits,
                Message 7 of 17 , Dec 30, 2001
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                  Hi folks, just want to add my 2 cents worth to this topic, if I may?
                  I too am about to construct the modified N/S still. At present I have a
                  Still Spirits, "super reflux model". I will be using the 50Lt beer keg etc
                  and a stainless 50mm pipe system. What I have seen used by others is
                  stainless coupling's that have a male/female thread like a nut and bolt,
                  just hollow, the nut actually slips over the pipe. These are purpose built,
                  to be welded onto the stainless pipe and are close to the same internal size
                  as the pipe. They probably end up with a 1mm gap inside when the nut is
                  tightened. As the nut section is hexagonal it can be tightened with a
                  wrench. They also make the male threaded sections to take neoprene seals on
                  the bearing surface to stop leaks. I visited a fellow distiller who used a
                  50Lt keg and he makes a 100mm diameter still for sale, what he did was use a
                  100mm fitting at the keg end, which was welded into place on the top of the
                  keg. This stopped the leaks and made it easy to get his hand inside to fit
                  the elements and clean out the keg etc. He used a 100mm SS pipe, although
                  mine will be 50mm, I'll just make a reducing section above this 100mm SS
                  fitting, may just use another coupling here just depends on the cost of
                  fittings. At the other end of my column, I intend to have another 50mm
                  coupling that will join the N/S head onto the column. Similar to the way
                  Matt has shown in his photos.

                  Carbon filter
                  Now with the "column" from above, I am also going to join another coupling
                  with a piece of 100mm pipe approximately 300mm in length. This will screw
                  onto the bottom end of this "column", which I will now upturn to use as my
                  carbon filter. Onto the now bottom other end, I will screw another female
                  coupling nut that has a ball tap welded in place. This column I can then
                  fill with activated carbon and use the 100mm x 300mm pipe section as a
                  reservoir for the unfiltered spirit. This is hung on the wall and allowed to
                  drip into a large collection container. This way I use the 50mmSS pipe for
                  both the refractionating column and carbon filter.

                  I agree with John below about the small welding shop. If you are going down
                  the Stainless steel road, then get it welded by a pro, you won't be sorry. I
                  used to work in machine shops, (Career change) My neighbour works as a
                  maintaince fitter in a margarine factory and they use 50mm stainless steel
                  pipe and these couplings everywhere in the factory:) just an idea on where
                  to start looking! I went over and saw Matt's copper N/S Still (as seen in
                  photos on Tony's web site) last weekend and it is a beauty, (Matt's on
                  holiday's at the moment) I was picking his brains about where he sourced the
                  pipe and fittings. Matt said that he went to a large plumbing supply shop
                  that allowed customers to wander around looking at the fittings and
                  couplings.

                  There are several elements that determine where exactly you will site the
                  still when in use!
                  1. Heating source, eg electricity or gas? Availability of a power outlet or
                  extension cord!
                  2. The final assembled height of the still, will it be able to stand upright
                  inside your house/garage/flat, or will you have to use the man hole in the
                  ceiling to run the still or can you use it outside?
                  3. The cooling water, a supply of cool water and the used coolant, a lot of
                  folks use the used cooling water to fill the pool or water the plants. I
                  personally have it connected to an irrigation system in the yard to water
                  the plants.
                  4. How isolated your property, inside/outside! Or how paranoid you are about
                  a visit from the law!


                  I now step down off my soapbox! Or was it a still I was standing on? :)

                  Robert
                  +_+_+_+_+_+_+_+_+_+_+_+_+_+_+_+_+_+_+_+_+_+_+_
                  >The subject of joining various bits of tube together is a fairly common one
                  on this list, and if I may make a few >suggestions on this common problem:
                  there is a point when the oft used phrase "don't try this at home kids"
                  really is >applicable here. I know that part of the fun in home distilling
                  is to be able to say you "made it yourself", but there >are times when
                  professional help is the way to go. I think you would be surprised to find
                  that small welding jobs can be done for remarkably little money and even
                  more likely, a quantity of alcoholic beverages will work as currency. More
                  often
                  >than not, a small welding shop will not care what you are making, as you
                  are simply going to ask for some bits of metal >to be joined together. When
                  I started on my still project, any time I had a question I would simply say
                  "I'm making a >still". Universally, everyone had helpful suggestions and
                  usually added stories of someone they knew that had a still... >The big
                  advantage of getting a pro to help is that they will have better and bigger
                  equipment than you, which will turn a >difficult job at home, into a few
                  minutes for a skilled tradesman, and the results will be much more
                  satisfactory as >well.
                  >John
                  +_+_+_+_+_+_+_+_+_+_+_+_+_+_+_+_+_+_+_+_+_+_+_


                  Have a great day!

                  Robert



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