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Help this new distiller Peach Must????

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  • John
    I know there are lots of very experienced distillers here and I have seen discussions lead to 10 or more comments on lots of posts. I have twice posted here
    Message 1 of 10 , Jul 30, 2006
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      I know there are lots of very experienced distillers here and I have
      seen discussions lead to 10 or more comments on lots of posts. I have
      twice posted here concering my peach must and twice I get one response
      and it dies. I am simply seeking advice. My friend has a still and
      we together have distilled sugar washes.

      We are seeking advice on our new venture, a peach brandy. To recap,
      we had around 140 to 160 pounds of peaches, 70 pounds of granulated
      sugar, and enough water to take all this up to about 45 gallons of
      must. We pitted and crushed all the peaches. We dissolved the sugar
      in the water by boiling. We used well water. To this once at 70
      degrees we added 6 pakets of champgne yeast. I have stirred this
      daily for 13 days. It has ceased fermentation and we have taste
      tested it. There remains no sugar in the must.

      This morning in preparation of some distilling this afternoon I
      started removing some of the fruit pulp. It is quite broken down from
      the fermentation. But it also has a very awful smell. It is not a
      rotten smell, but is definately not pleasent. This smell is also
      present in the wine/must we have taste tested. But it does not
      'taste' bad. My post is looking for a few answers. What is this
      smell? Is it going to transfer to our finished product? If this is
      bad, how can we prevent it next time?

      Thanks for any and all responses. I know there are many experienced
      folks here and I always come here for my answers. We are going to be
      using a pot still with a thumper by the way. Thanks!!
    • John
      Also any other advice would be greatly appreciated!!!! Thanks!! ... y answers. We are going to be
      Message 2 of 10 , Jul 30, 2006
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        Also any other advice would be greatly appreciated!!!! Thanks!!


        --- In new_distillers@yahoogroups.com, "John" <cls912@...> wrote:
        >
        > I know there are lots of very experienced distillers here and I have
        > seen discussions lead to 10 or more comments on lots of posts. I have
        > twice posted here concering my peach must and twice I get one response
        > and it dies. I am simply seeking advice. My friend has a still and
        > we together have distilled sugar washes.
        >
        > We are seeking advice on our new venture, a peach brandy. To recap,
        > we had around 140 to 160 pounds of peaches, 70 pounds of granulated
        > sugar, and enough water to take all this up to about 45 gallons of
        > must. We pitted and crushed all the peaches. We dissolved the sugar
        > in the water by boiling. We used well water. To this once at 70
        > degrees we added 6 pakets of champgne yeast. I have stirred this
        > daily for 13 days. It has ceased fermentation and we have taste
        > tested it. There remains no sugar in the must.
        >
        > This morning in preparation of some distilling this afternoon I
        > started removing some of the fruit pulp. It is quite broken down from
        > the fermentation. But it also has a very awful smell. It is not a
        > rotten smell, but is definately not pleasent. This smell is also
        > present in the wine/must we have taste tested. But it does not
        > 'taste' bad. My post is looking for a few answers. What is this
        > smell? Is it going to transfer to our finished product? If this is
        > bad, how can we prevent it next time?
        >
        > Thanks for any and all responses. I know there are many experienced
        > folks here and I always come here for m



        y answers. We are going to be
        > using a pot still with a thumper by the way. Thanks!!
        >
      • suitcase1499@aol.com
        Well I don t know if this will help or not but I just made some peach wine. I had about 25 lbs of peaches, I peeled & pitted them and then put them into a food
        Message 3 of 10 , Jul 30, 2006
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          Well I don't know if this will help or not but I just made some peach wine.
          I had about 25 lbs of peaches, I peeled & pitted them and then put them into
          a food processor with a little hot water in each round and ground them into
          a puree. When finished withall of them I added about 10 lbs of sugar that I
          had disolved in boiling water. I made it up to about 14 gallons topped up with
          water. When it cooled to around 100*F I added Pectic enzyme, Two packs of
          Wine Yeast that I had already reconstituted. I added a couple of spoonfuls of
          yeast energizer. MY SG was 1.100 5 days later the FG was 1.000 I added some
          sparkolloid waited a couple days and added ascorbic acid, Waited about 3 more
          ddays and most all the pulp and stuff had settled to the bottom I siphoned off
          about 10 gallons of decent wine and thew the rest out.

          Suitcase


          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        • John
          By the way, in the ingridents, we did add one pound of yeast nutrient. I forgot to add the pectin enzyme. I had it on hand, but forgot to add it prior to
          Message 4 of 10 , Jul 30, 2006
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            By the way, in the ingridents, we did add one pound of yeast nutrient.
            I forgot to add the pectin enzyme. I had it on hand, but forgot to
            add it prior to pitching the yeast.

            --- In new_distillers@yahoogroups.com, suitcase1499@... wrote:
            >
            > Well I don't know if this will help or not but I just made some
            peach wine.
            > I had about 25 lbs of peaches, I peeled & pitted them and then put
            them into
            > a food processor with a little hot water in each round and ground
            them into
            > a puree. When finished withall of them I added about 10 lbs of sugar
            that I
            > had disolved in boiling water. I made it up to about 14 gallons
            topped up with
            > water. When it cooled to around 100*F I added Pectic enzyme, Two
            packs of
            > Wine Yeast that I had already reconstituted. I added a couple of
            spoonfuls of
            > yeast energizer. MY SG was 1.100 5 days later the FG was 1.000 I
            added some
            > sparkolloid waited a couple days and added ascorbic acid, Waited
            about 3 more
            > ddays and most all the pulp and stuff had settled to the bottom I
            siphoned off
            > about 10 gallons of decent wine and thew the rest out.
            >
            > Suitcase
            >
            >
            > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
            >
          • Harry
            ... John, At the risk of sounding like a cracked phonograph record (showin me age now), may I suggest you use Prof Kris Berglund s excellent book Artisan
            Message 5 of 10 , Jul 30, 2006
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              --- In new_distillers@yahoogroups.com, "John" <cls912@...> wrote:
              >
              > Also any other advice would be greatly appreciated!!!! Thanks!!
              >



              John,
              At the risk of sounding like a cracked phonograph record (showin' me
              age now), may I suggest you use Prof Kris Berglund's excellent
              book "Artisan Distilling"?

              The good Professor is leading the charge in the renaissance of
              boutique fruit distillation, and is considered to be a prominent
              authority on the subject, being as how he teaches and distils on a
              daily basis together with advising fruit growers and government in
              Michegan.

              You'll find the book (free to read) at my library...
              http://distillers.tastylime.net/library/


              Slainte!
              regards Harry
            • tim smith
              Hi John...I`ve made peach mash a few times.....the trick is ,do not leave the mash in the mix for more than 4 days... also you do not need pure peach juice
              Message 6 of 10 , Jul 30, 2006
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                Hi John...I`ve made peach mash a few times.....the trick is ,do not leave the mash in the mix for more than 4 days... also you do not need pure peach juice for a mix....dilute the mix to 25% juice to 75% water..add sugar to produce 1.095 on your hydrometer..now as for the cleaning up!!!... on a refux still, the bad should stay behind..strip the first run, then run the next run in a valved reflux mode if you can..good luck ... Tim

                John <cls912@...> wrote: I know there are lots of very experienced distillers here and I have
                seen discussions lead to 10 or more comments on lots of posts. I have
                twice posted here concering my peach must and twice I get one response
                and it dies. I am simply seeking advice. My friend has a still and
                we together have distilled sugar washes.

                We are seeking advice on our new venture, a peach brandy. To recap,
                we had around 140 to 160 pounds of peaches, 70 pounds of granulated
                sugar, and enough water to take all this up to about 45 gallons of
                must. We pitted and crushed all the peaches. We dissolved the sugar
                in the water by boiling. We used well water. To this once at 70
                degrees we added 6 pakets of champgne yeast. I have stirred this
                daily for 13 days. It has ceased fermentation and we have taste
                tested it. There remains no sugar in the must.

                This morning in preparation of some distilling this afternoon I
                started removing some of the fruit pulp. It is quite broken down from
                the fermentation. But it also has a very awful smell. It is not a
                rotten smell, but is definately not pleasent. This smell is also
                present in the wine/must we have taste tested. But it does not
                'taste' bad. My post is looking for a few answers. What is this
                smell? Is it going to transfer to our finished product? If this is
                bad, how can we prevent it next time?

                Thanks for any and all responses. I know there are many experienced
                folks here and I always come here for my answers. We are going to be
                using a pot still with a thumper by the way. Thanks!!






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                [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
              • donald holcombe
                Does it smell like air from a tire? That would be Hydrogen Sulfide.You might have tried removing the fruit after a week. If you want a peach smell , it leaves
                Message 7 of 10 , Jul 30, 2006
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                  Does it smell like air from a tire? That would be Hydrogen Sulfide.You might have tried removing the fruit after a week. If you want a peach smell , it leaves during ferment. What I get is a taste like you are holding you nose and eating a peach. No smell But a flavor on the back of the tongue.I always put flavor essence in to bring back the aroma.Be careful next time stirring . You should steralyze the stirrer each time it is used.If you have sulfur smell bubble air through the must before distilling.

                  John <cls912@...> wrote: I know there are lots of very experienced distillers here and I have
                  seen discussions lead to 10 or more comments on lots of posts. I have
                  twice posted here concering my peach must and twice I get one response
                  and it dies. I am simply seeking advice. My friend has a still and
                  we together have distilled sugar washes.

                  We are seeking advice on our new venture, a peach brandy. To recap,
                  we had around 140 to 160 pounds of peaches, 70 pounds of granulated
                  sugar, and enough water to take all this up to about 45 gallons of
                  must. We pitted and crushed all the peaches. We dissolved the sugar
                  in the water by boiling. We used well water. To this once at 70
                  degrees we added 6 pakets of champgne yeast. I have stirred this
                  daily for 13 days. It has ceased fermentation and we have taste
                  tested it. There remains no sugar in the must.

                  This morning in preparation of some distilling this afternoon I
                  started removing some of the fruit pulp. It is quite broken down from
                  the fermentation. But it also has a very awful smell. It is not a
                  rotten smell, but is definately not pleasent. This smell is also
                  present in the wine/must we have taste tested. But it does not
                  'taste' bad. My post is looking for a few answers. What is this
                  smell? Is it going to transfer to our finished product? If this is
                  bad, how can we prevent it next time?

                  Thanks for any and all responses. I know there are many experienced
                  folks here and I always come here for my answers. We are going to be
                  using a pot still with a thumper by the way. Thanks!!






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                  [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                • John
                  I am almost 99% sure it is sulfur. We cooked some tonight. It does not have the smell and it is good stuff. We are using a pot still with a thumper. THe
                  Message 8 of 10 , Jul 30, 2006
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                    I am almost 99% sure it is sulfur. We cooked some tonight. It does
                    not have the smell and it is good stuff. We are using a pot still
                    with a thumper. THe only problem we have with the deal is the time.
                    Maybe it is normal but here it goes.

                    We are using a pot still similiar to many I have seen on here. It is
                    made with a 4 gallon stock pot and lid held on with clips. The take
                    off is 1 inch that goes almost straight up for 2 feet and then makes a
                    90 and goes about six inches to the thumper which then goes about 6
                    inches to a 45 that leads to a 2 inch dia. condenser.

                    We brought the temp up to about 170 before we started getting
                    anything. We took the first half pint and considered it heads since
                    the temp went up to around 182 and 183 for the next quart and a half.
                    Then the temp jumped to 200 and we collected another pint there. The
                    temp then started coming down. We let the rig cool enough that we
                    could take the lid off and off 2 gallons of must we started with a
                    little over a gallon of it was left. Is that correct?

                    Also, the time. To collect the total of almost 2 quarts of alcohol,
                    which by the way I am guessing just by tasting and smelling to be
                    around 85 %ABV, it took almost 2 1/2 hours.

                    We heat with propane which is on very very low heat.

                    Also on the smell issue. I am getting all the must off the fruit
                    tomorrow. Then I am going to arerate it all to try and get all the
                    sulfur I can off of it. While no smelll transferred to the
                    distillate, I still don;t like it being there.

                    Let me know on all this guys. I am open and listening!!! Thanks!!

                    --- In new_distillers@yahoogroups.com, donald holcombe
                    <blackledge_02@...> wrote:
                    >
                    > Does it smell like air from a tire? That would be Hydrogen
                    Sulfide.You might have tried removing the fruit after a week. If you
                    want a peach smell , it leaves during ferment. What I get is a taste
                    like you are holding you nose and eating a peach. No smell But a
                    flavor on the back of the tongue.I always put flavor essence in to
                    bring back the aroma.Be careful next time stirring . You should
                    steralyze the stirrer each time it is used.If you have sulfur smell
                    bubble air through the must before distilling.
                    >
                    > John <cls912@...> wrote: I know there are lots of very
                    experienced distillers here and I have
                    > seen discussions lead to 10 or more comments on lots of posts. I have
                    > twice posted here concering my peach must and twice I get one response
                    > and it dies. I am simply seeking advice. My friend has a still and
                    > we together have distilled sugar washes.
                    >
                    > We are seeking advice on our new venture, a peach brandy. To recap,
                    > we had around 140 to 160 pounds of peaches, 70 pounds of granulated
                    > sugar, and enough water to take all this up to about 45 gallons of
                    > must. We pitted and crushed all the peaches. We dissolved the sugar
                    > in the water by boiling. We used well water. To this once at 70
                    > degrees we added 6 pakets of champgne yeast. I have stirred this
                    > daily for 13 days. It has ceased fermentation and we have taste
                    > tested it. There remains no sugar in the must.
                    >
                    > This morning in preparation of some distilling this afternoon I
                    > started removing some of the fruit pulp. It is quite broken down from
                    > the fermentation. But it also has a very awful smell. It is not a
                    > rotten smell, but is definately not pleasent. This smell is also
                    > present in the wine/must we have taste tested. But it does not
                    > 'taste' bad. My post is looking for a few answers. What is this
                    > smell? Is it going to transfer to our finished product? If this is
                    > bad, how can we prevent it next time?
                    >
                    > Thanks for any and all responses. I know there are many experienced
                    > folks here and I always come here for my answers. We are going to be
                    > using a pot still with a thumper by the way. Thanks!!
                    >
                    >
                    >
                    >
                    >
                    >
                    > ---------------------------------
                    > Yahoo! Music Unlimited - Access over 1 million songs.Try it free.
                    >
                    > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                    >
                  • donald holcombe
                    Dont assume about the ABV. Get a P&T hydrometer. It also sounds like you might have a leak.I wouldnt use a thumperfor brandy. It strips too much essence from
                    Message 9 of 10 , Jul 31, 2006
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                      Dont assume about the ABV. Get a P&T hydrometer. It also sounds like you might have a leak.I wouldnt use a thumperfor brandy. It strips too much essence from the likker. You need a thermometer in the thumper or you can sample the output till the thumper is finished.the temp in the pot wont be a good gage because the likker is in the thumper and you need boiling water from the pot to chase the likker out of thethumper. Flash test it or use your thumbnail if you dont have a hydrometer to make the final cut.Did you put must in the thumper? Got to Go . Be back later.

                      John <cls912@...> wrote: Also any other advice would be greatly appreciated!!!! Thanks!!

                      --- In new_distillers@yahoogroups.com, "John" <cls912@...> wrote:
                      >
                      > I know there are lots of very experienced distillers here and I have
                      > seen discussions lead to 10 or more comments on lots of posts. I have
                      > twice posted here concering my peach must and twice I get one response
                      > and it dies. I am simply seeking advice. My friend has a still and
                      > we together have distilled sugar washes.
                      >
                      > We are seeking advice on our new venture, a peach brandy. To recap,
                      > we had around 140 to 160 pounds of peaches, 70 pounds of granulated
                      > sugar, and enough water to take all this up to about 45 gallons of
                      > must. We pitted and crushed all the peaches. We dissolved the sugar
                      > in the water by boiling. We used well water. To this once at 70
                      > degrees we added 6 pakets of champgne yeast. I have stirred this
                      > daily for 13 days. It has ceased fermentation and we have taste
                      > tested it. There remains no sugar in the must.
                      >
                      > This morning in preparation of some distilling this afternoon I
                      > started removing some of the fruit pulp. It is quite broken down from
                      > the fermentation. But it also has a very awful smell. It is not a
                      > rotten smell, but is definately not pleasent. This smell is also
                      > present in the wine/must we have taste tested. But it does not
                      > 'taste' bad. My post is looking for a few answers. What is this
                      > smell? Is it going to transfer to our finished product? If this is
                      > bad, how can we prevent it next time?
                      >
                      > Thanks for any and all responses. I know there are many experienced
                      > folks here and I always come here for m

                      y answers. We are going to be
                      > using a pot still with a thumper by the way. Thanks!!
                      >






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                    • Allan DeGroot
                      You are better off without the pectin enzyme anyway. Inderstand that pectin is a methyl Ester and breaking it down invariably produces methanol (not a lot,
                      Message 10 of 10 , Aug 3, 2006
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                        You are better off without the pectin enzyme anyway.

                        Inderstand that pectin is a methyl Ester and breaking it down
                        invariably produces methanol (not a lot, but...)

                        If you've gone WEEKS you should have already cooked it.

                        The "awful" smell is probably Hydrogen sulfide and you can
                        get rid of it, but it's usually easier to simply distill the "wash"
                        of a fruit fermentation on the pulp at the end of 4-7days

                        Any longer and it just gets "messy"

                        AllanD


                        --- In new_distillers@yahoogroups.com, "John" <cls912@...> wrote:
                        >
                        > By the way, in the ingridents, we did add one pound of yeast nutrient.
                        > I forgot to add the pectin enzyme. I had it on hand, but forgot to
                        > add it prior to pitching the yeast.
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