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Re: [new_distillers] Oaking for color and flavor...

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  • Trid
    ... For Bourbon, charred oak is the key to the rich red color and deep flavor. Take some unused, un-toaste, or ligtly toasted oak fingers and set them aflame
    Message 1 of 3 , Jul 24, 2006
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      > 3. Oaking for color and flavor...
      > Posted by: "Michael Eyre" meyre@... drdoom74
      > Date: Mon Jul 24, 2006 5:57 am (PDT)
      >
      > So, in about ¼ gallon of 42% product, I’m putting about 6 finger length
      > sticks of white oak toasted at 450 degrees for 4.5 hours. The color,
      > after two months, isn’t very dark, and although the flavor isn’t bad,
      > it’s not the deep, big Bourbon flavor that I was hoping for. I was
      > thinking about using a mixture of the toasted oak I’d already used, some
      > plain oak, untoasted, and some darker, charcoaled oak, sort of a cross
      > section of the wood that the whiskey might encounter in a real barrel…
      > do you think I’m on to something, or am I grasping at straws? I’m just
      > mostly looking for some more complexity in the stuff, and a really deep
      > color and big flavor.

      For Bourbon, charred oak is the key to the rich red color and deep flavor.
      Take some unused, un-toaste, or ligtly toasted oak fingers and set them aflame
      with a torch and let them go for about one minute. Toss them into some
      drinking quality water to extinguish the flames. Light them up once more (more
      torch work to drive the water out...the steam action should act in a similar
      fashion as steam is used in 'activated' charcoal, too) and quench them once
      more almost immediately. You can either oven dry them or let them air dry, and
      replace 2 or 3 of the fingers you're already using.

      The goal is to get a partial char. The boundary layer between the blackened
      carbon layer and the unaffected wood is where the red is formed by the
      caramelization of the sugars in the wood (among other reactions). You should
      notice the difference with the added charred oak.

      Trid
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