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Re: Yeast

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  • CJackson_98
    ... Brendon, I am using a reflux still, and I didn t think that once you cooked the wash all you can do is throw away what s left. My wash is real brown after
    Message 1 of 58 , Jun 2, 2006
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      --- In new_distillers@yahoogroups.com, "abbababbaccc"
      <abbababbaccc@...> wrote:
      >
      > Alternatively it could be that the yeast ran out of nutrients.
      > Adding more yeast and nutrients could also work.
      >
      > - Riku
      > Thanks for the info

      > --- In new_distillers@yahoogroups.com, "Brendan Keith" <bkeith@>
      > wrote:
      > > Or you could just distill what you have, even with the extra
      > wasted sugar
      > > still in the wash and use less next time.
      > > Brendan Keith
      > > bkeith@

      Brendon, I am using a reflux still, and I didn't think that once you cooked
      the wash all you can do is throw away what's left. My wash is real brown
      after cooking. I usally get about 4 liters at 93 % when I was in New
      Zealand using the turbo yeast in 25 liter batches. The last batch with the
      bakers yeast (can't read the writing on the label) I wound up with ~3
      liters. The wash normally stayed at around 30c for the 2 weeks ferminting.
    • Becool Stayslinky
      Robert, There are a lot of variables, and in the end it comes down to experimentation and personal preference. Take a look at this yeast reference chart for
      Message 58 of 58 , Feb 5, 2013
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        Robert, 

        There are a lot of variables, and in the end it comes down to experimentation and personal preference.  Take a look at this yeast reference chart for some basic information, and note the differences in the characteristics of the different strains.


        I mentioned EC1118 and DV10 for vodka because of the characteristics listed on the chart, fast ferment, temp and alcohol tolerant, neutral, etc.  I only make vodka, so these are the yeasts I use.  If you want to make whiskey or rum or whatever, I'm sure there are better choices.  I have also used bread yeast in the past, both regular and instant start, and they fermented Just fine.  I plan to try them both again in the future.  

        Just remember that if you push the limits of any yeast you can end up with undesirable flavors.  Choose a yeast and work with it for a while to figure out how to make it happy.  Control your variables and refine your process around the yeast's best interests and it will be your friend.

        Almost forgot, have used superstart with sugar before - didn't like it, made bad flavors that I couldn't get rid of after multiple reflux distillations.

        BC


        --- In new_distillers@yahoogroups.com, "last2blast" wrote:
        >
        > We have mentioned Lalvin EC-1118, DV 10, Red Star, Brewer's, and Baker's yeast so far, but the most important issue: What is the best yeast for conversion of sugar into alcohol and under what types of mash, wort, or wash?
        >
        > So far I have tried baking yeast for less than stellar results: Averaging less than 1 qt. per 2 gal stripping run. My stripping run for 2 gal of EC-1118 was 2 full qts. 3 cups of sugar was used per gal in both cases. Cut off was at 204 F because stripping at a higher temp was unreasonable for me. Yes baker's yeast is only alcohol tolerant up to 4% abv and EC-1118 is tolerant up to 16% abv, so yeast is very important for us beginners. Finding the right yeast for what we are trying to do will be one of our greatest challenges.
        >
        > Basically, I obtained more alcohol by using EC-1118 than my first experiments with the same amount of sugar which was expected, but 3 times more alcohol was a surprise. As another future experiment, a turbo like yeast was purchased that was made by a company named: Winemakeri Inc. it claims 20% abv in 5 to 7 days, but the question will be taste. I have read in a number of places that all turbo yeasts need to be run through a charcoal filter because all turbo yeasts have an undesirable taste and smell.
        >
        > Robert
        >
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