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Re: Brainteaser answer

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  • Harry
    ... Heh, I thought that would get your attention. The thing is, it also works in reverse, in that for the alcohol to be cooled down, it must give up that heat.
    Message 1 of 4 , May 1, 2006
      --- In new_distillers@yahoogroups.com, "sonum norbu" <blanik@...>
      wrote:
      >
      > Shit Harry, I hope I remember that for a future life. :))
      > ......blanikdog



      Heh, I thought that would get your attention.
      The thing is, it also works in reverse, in that for the alcohol to be
      cooled down, it must give up that heat. This means it's easy to
      calculate how much heat needs to be removed per hour from a known
      quantity of vapour produced per hour. (however you need to make calcs
      using the latent heat of vaporization for that). What can you do with
      the info? Design and build a condenser to remove that amount of heat,
      of course. No guesswork, no 'overkill'. Job done.

      If you want 2 condensers in a VM still, 1 for reflux & 1 for product
      condensing & cooling, you can use calcs to design for both. If you
      want 1 reflux/product condenser in a LM still, just match your heat
      source's output (BTU, or Watts) to the calcs for removing that heat
      Then you can predict accurately how much juice you collect per hour
      for any given reflux ratio and power input. How do you judge the
      size/amount of the heat input? By calculating the amount of vapour
      that input will produce, then calculating the speed of that vapour
      volume in your proposed column diameter. Too fast? Either reduce the
      heat input, or get a bigger diameter column. This is what I mean when
      I say that designing stills is all a matter of balance. Done
      correctly, power controllers, lots of coils/metal, big pumps etc
      aren't necessary. Thus costs of building and operation are reduced
      considerably.

      If you're building a 'one-off' it doesn't matter so much, just follow
      a known configuration that works. But if you're building as a
      business, or building one from scratch by your own design, then cost
      and/or rebuild to fix mistakes are real issues.


      Slainte!
      regards Harry
    • sonum norbu
      I knew that!!!!.....blanikdog :) ... From: Harry To: new_distillers@yahoogroups.com Subject: [new_distillers] Re: Brainteaser answer Date: Tue, 02 May 2006
      Message 2 of 4 , May 1, 2006
        I knew that!!!!.....blanikdog :)

        ----- Original Message -----
        From: Harry
        To: new_distillers@yahoogroups.com
        Subject: [new_distillers] Re: Brainteaser answer
        Date: Tue, 02 May 2006 01:38:43 -0000

        --- In new_distillers@yahoogroups.com, "sonum norbu" <blanik@...>
        wrote:
        >
        > Shit Harry, I hope I remember that for a future life. :))
        > ......blanikdog



        Heh, I thought that would get your attention.
        The thing is, it also works in reverse, in that for the alcohol to be
        cooled down, it must give up that heat. This means it's easy to
        calculate how much heat needs to be removed per hour from a known
        quantity of vapour produced per hour. (however you need to make
        calcs
        using the latent heat of vaporization for that). What can you do
        with
        the info? Design and build a condenser to remove that amount of
        heat,
        of course. No guesswork, no 'overkill'. Job done.

        If you want 2 condensers in a VM still, 1 for reflux & 1 for product
        condensing & cooling, you can use calcs to design for both. If you
        want 1 reflux/product condenser in a LM still, just match your heat
        source's output (BTU, or Watts) to the calcs for removing that heat
        Then you can predict accurately how much juice you collect per hour
        for any given reflux ratio and power input. How do you judge the
        size/amount of the heat input? By calculating the amount of vapour
        that input will produce, then calculating the speed of that vapour
        volume in your proposed column diameter. Too fast? Either reduce
        the
        heat input, or get a bigger diameter column. This is what I mean
        when
        I say that designing stills is all a matter of balance. Done
        correctly, power controllers, lots of coils/metal, big pumps etc
        aren't necessary. Thus costs of building and operation are reduced
        considerably.

        If you're building a 'one-off' it doesn't matter so much, just follow
        a known configuration that works. But if you're building as a
        business, or building one from scratch by your own design, then cost
        and/or rebuild to fix mistakes are real issues.


        Slainte!
        regards Harry





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