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Re: [new_distillers] NEW, and I would like some help with an Item I bought

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  • Gregory Bloom
    That looks like a sweet old potstill. I don t think you need coils or anything else. The main thing is to be able to control the heat going into it so you
    Message 1 of 11 , Mar 5, 2006
      That looks like a sweet old potstill. I don't think you need coils or anything else. The main thing is to be able to control the heat going into it so you can keep it at a low simmer. That'll guarantee that you are able to condense the output using just an air-cooled arm. (I don't recommend using the wood stove it is pictured on because it'd be hard to control the temp, and may also heat the arm). If you want to increase your proof and purity a bit (at the possible cost of some flavor), you could pack the "mushroom head" on the top with copper pot-scrubbers (being sure they're really copper, not copper-coated iron - i.e. a magnet won't attract them). It'd also be useful to add a thermometer right at the throat of the arm to monitor the vapor temp of what you're condensing so you know about where you are in the run. (Though the old-time way to make your cuts is just by smell and the inevitable taste or two, rather than a thermometer). Be sure to clean the inside with vinegar
      and salt or something to brighten the copper. This will help remove trace sulfur compounds and make a much-improved flavor. One thing that's hard to see in your photos is how many pieces it disassembles into. If it's all one piece that'll be a pain to clean.

      One other thing to pay close attention to is leaks. In a well-used still that old, it may not seal well at the joints. An old-time solution to this is to make a stiff flour and water dough and plug the leaks. After fooling with it a bit you can come to know where the leaks are and just plug them as part of your normal set-up.

      What you can make with this is any of the naturally flavorful spirits such as whiskey, rum, brandy, grappa, tequila, etc. What you can't make is perfect vodka (unless you're willing to redistill about 9 times to get pure vodka). I've come to prefer the artful challenge of using a potstill over the scientific precision of a reflux column. It certainly gives a more complex product.

      As far as where to start, I'd say have a look at the http://homedistiller.org site. I also recommend getting yourself a copy of Ian Smiley's "Making Pure Corn Whiskey" book.

      Looks like fun!


      sixgablesmobileunit <mantle@...> wrote: Hello;

      I purchased an item at a gun show, listed in the photos section. I
      wonder if it is a pot still?

      I am thinking it is. Ok so the next like 100 questions are:

      What can I make in this unit. It is all copper with the exception
      of the end with what I think is a brass coupling. The top has a
      small opening that has a screw in fitting, assuming this is for
      the "mixture" to go in once it has fermented.

      I do not have the coils or anything else. I looked at a hardware
      store and found a number of fittings that probably would interlock
      in the fitting on the end of the unit. So the next question is does
      this unit only need coils that are air cooled like 20 feet or so
      stretched open. I do not know how many turns of the "worm" there
      should be, especially if I am unable to run the coils in water to
      cool them down.

      One thing was mentioned that this unit was used often by the old
      timmer, but he was going into assisted living with his wife and got
      rid of it. It has been used up to possibly 20 years ago. The guy I
      bought it off of said it was painted with 4 different colors before
      he got down to the patena, and I scrubbed it up with bar keeper's
      friend. I need to scrub some more on it.

      Besides the coils, what else am I missing from this unit? I would
      like to give it a go and see what happens. I do not know about the
      receipe or anything to use to start it out or length of time. I
      understand there is a fermenting process to do first then the actual
      still use later.

      Anyone want to suggest help here?







      New Distillers group archives are at http://archive.nnytech.net/
      FAQ and other information available at http://homedistiller.org





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    • sixgablesmobileunit
      First things firs, Thanks for answering someting; Next, OK so agreed this is an old potstill. I am glad, and was quite taken when it was on the table at the
      Message 2 of 11 , Mar 5, 2006
        First things firs, Thanks for answering someting;

        Next,
        OK so agreed this is an old potstill. I am glad, and was quite
        taken when it was on the table at the gun show. One thing, yes it
        is a pain to clean, only one access point, the 1 inch brass plug you
        can see in the photos. Not much to get into/out of. I have cleaned
        inside and out as best I can, but I plan on scrubbing more. Side
        note, the stove is not wood, but a corn stove. I burn corn to heat
        my home and have not turned on the natural gas yet. The top surface
        of the stove will take a pan of water and make it simmer w/o causing
        burn to the hand. I generally keep an old refrigerator collection
        pan on top and full, almost a gallon of water will be gone in a
        day. All I have to do is put about 70 lbs of corn in the back
        hopper and walk away for say 18 hours. Since I am unable to unscrew
        the top, I would have thought it would have screw in but I am unable
        to unfasten it, any suggestions on how it would unscrew? I was
        considering using a charcoal filter and or thermometer at the base
        of the arm [small end] where the second brass connection is, and a
        worm coil. I saw a site that suggested using coils going up like 8
        turns then down 8 turns. At the hardware I found several different
        T's and 90 degree fittings and was planning on using something
        there. How hot does the vapor need to be to start the process
        through the worm , [ I have seen notes on 172/173 as well as 80/95
        degrees for the fermented wash to brew]; and how hot does the
        condensed vapor need to be when it falls from the tube? How long
        would a worm tube need to be to be air cooled. Is there a magic
        number of twists you generally need to get a better proof on your
        mixture? I think this unit could not hold much more than 1 or
        possibly 1-1/2 gallons max.

        As for leaks, I do not think there are any. I can blow into the
        tube [small end] and hold the pressure for a moment and it all blows
        back at me, kind of like blowing up a baloon and letting it go.

        I have a stone 1 gallon crock thermos and was thinking of using this
        for the mash. As to the mixture; heavens knows, I do not. I have
        corn and more corn to start with, but I have also seen fruit
        mixtures and am not sure if I should start with wine and something
        and try to hop the mix up to a better brew, ie brandy? Again I am
        so new at this the plastic wrapper is still stuck on me!

        Well that is what 3 questions of the next 100 to go? You will be
        hearing from me often, and yes I hope this is fun.


        --- In new_distillers@yahoogroups.com, Gregory Bloom <gjbloom@...>
        wrote:
        >
        > That looks like a sweet old potstill. I don't think you need
        coils or anything else. The main thing is to be able to control the
        heat going into it so you can keep it at a low simmer. That'll
        guarantee that you are able to condense the output using just an air-
        cooled arm. (I don't recommend using the wood stove it is pictured
        on because it'd be hard to control the temp, and may also heat the
        arm). If you want to increase your proof and purity a bit (at the
        possible cost of some flavor), you could pack the "mushroom head" on
        the top with copper pot-scrubbers (being sure they're really copper,
        not copper-coated iron - i.e. a magnet won't attract them). It'd
        also be useful to add a thermometer right at the throat of the arm
        to monitor the vapor temp of what you're condensing so you know
        about where you are in the run. (Though the old-time way to make
        your cuts is just by smell and the inevitable taste or two, rather
        than a thermometer). Be sure to clean the inside with vinegar
        > and salt or something to brighten the copper. This will help
        remove trace sulfur compounds and make a much-improved flavor. One
        thing that's hard to see in your photos is how many pieces it
        disassembles into. If it's all one piece that'll be a pain to clean.
        >
        > One other thing to pay close attention to is leaks. In a well-
        used still that old, it may not seal well at the joints. An old-
        time solution to this is to make a stiff flour and water dough and
        plug the leaks. After fooling with it a bit you can come to know
        where the leaks are and just plug them as part of your normal set-up.
        >
        > What you can make with this is any of the naturally flavorful
        spirits such as whiskey, rum, brandy, grappa, tequila, etc. What
        you can't make is perfect vodka (unless you're willing to redistill
        about 9 times to get pure vodka). I've come to prefer the artful
        challenge of using a potstill over the scientific precision of a
        reflux column. It certainly gives a more complex product.
        >
        > As far as where to start, I'd say have a look at the
        http://homedistiller.org site. I also recommend getting yourself a
        copy of Ian Smiley's "Making Pure Corn Whiskey" book.
        >
        > Looks like fun!
        >
        >
        > sixgablesmobileunit <mantle@...> wrote: Hello;
        >
        > I purchased an item at a gun show, listed in the photos section.
        I
        > wonder if it is a pot still?
        >
        > I am thinking it is. Ok so the next like 100 questions are:
        >
        > What can I make in this unit. It is all copper with the
        exception
        > of the end with what I think is a brass coupling. The top has a
        > small opening that has a screw in fitting, assuming this is for
        > the "mixture" to go in once it has fermented.
        >
        > I do not have the coils or anything else. I looked at a hardware
        > store and found a number of fittings that probably would
        interlock
        > in the fitting on the end of the unit. So the next question is
        does
        > this unit only need coils that are air cooled like 20 feet or so
        > stretched open. I do not know how many turns of the "worm" there
        > should be, especially if I am unable to run the coils in water to
        > cool them down.
        >
        > One thing was mentioned that this unit was used often by the old
        > timmer, but he was going into assisted living with his wife and
        got
        > rid of it. It has been used up to possibly 20 years ago. The
        guy I
        > bought it off of said it was painted with 4 different colors
        before
        > he got down to the patena, and I scrubbed it up with bar keeper's
        > friend. I need to scrub some more on it.
        >
        > Besides the coils, what else am I missing from this unit? I
        would
        > like to give it a go and see what happens. I do not know about
        the
        > receipe or anything to use to start it out or length of time. I
        > understand there is a fermenting process to do first then the
        actual
        > still use later.
        >
        > Anyone want to suggest help here?
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
        > New Distillers group archives are at http://archive.nnytech.net/
        > FAQ and other information available at http://homedistiller.org
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
        > SPONSORED LINKS
        > Food and
        drink Home
        distilling
        Culture
        Culture club
        Organizational culture
        Distillers

        >
        > ---------------------------------
        > YAHOO! GROUPS LINKS
        >
        >
        > Visit your group "new_distillers" on the web.
        >
        > To unsubscribe from this group, send an email to:
        > new_distillers-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com
        >
        > Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to the Yahoo! Terms of
        Service.
        >
        >
        > ---------------------------------
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
        > ---------------------------------
        > Yahoo! Mail
        > Bring photos to life! New PhotoMail makes sharing a breeze.
        >
        > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        >
      • Gregory Bloom
        A corn stove, huh? That d be kinda cool - burning corn to boil your corn mash. If it s a steady source of heat, then the only question is how you might make
        Message 3 of 11 , Mar 6, 2006
          A corn stove, huh? That'd be kinda cool - burning corn to boil your corn mash. If it's a steady source of heat, then the only question is how you might make it a bit warmer or cooler as needed. Since cleaning is a problem, you'll mant to be sure it doesn't get hot enough to scorch a layer on the bottom, which could become more-or-less permanent. Maybe placing it in the simmering pan of water would be a good idea.

          Also, I don't think you need a worm if your arm is sticking out away from the heat of your stove. Just a few degrees temperature difference between the start and finish of the arm should be enough to condense your vapors. But adding a worm won't hurt anything, and it might help deliver the product to a more convenient collection spot and make your product a bit cooler before it goes into your collection jar. As for how many turns, it's purely a matter of how much heat you need to dissapate. The advantage of having more cooling is that you can drive your still with more heat and shorten your run times (but also make the divisions between 'heads', 'hearts' and 'tails' less distinct). If it were my still, I'd try a run without adding anything and decide what it needs from there. A thermometer at the output of the arm isn't going to tell you much. The meaningful temperature is of the vapor as it enters the arm. If it's a single-piece unit then it doesn't sound like leaks are any
          concern. Since it sound's like you're up to your ears in corn (sorry) you'd probably be most interested in doing a pure corn mash. You can malt some (or perhaps all) of the corn you'll use, to get the amalyse converting the starch into fermentable sugars, then mash it up with some yeast. You'll be doing yourself a favor to get a copy of Ian Smiley's book. It's only 182 pages, but loaded with good info.


          sixgablesmobileunit <mantle@...> wrote:

          First things firs, Thanks for answering someting;

          Next,
          OK so agreed this is an old potstill. I am glad, and was quite
          taken when it was on the table at the gun show. One thing, yes it
          is a pain to clean, only one access point, the 1 inch brass plug you
          can see in the photos. Not much to get into/out of. I have cleaned
          inside and out as best I can, but I plan on scrubbing more. Side
          note, the stove is not wood, but a corn stove. I burn corn to heat
          my home and have not turned on the natural gas yet. The top surface
          of the stove will take a pan of water and make it simmer w/o causing
          burn to the hand. I generally keep an old refrigerator collection
          pan on top and full, almost a gallon of water will be gone in a
          day. All I have to do is put about 70 lbs of corn in the back
          hopper and walk away for say 18 hours. Since I am unable to unscrew
          the top, I would have thought it would have screw in but I am unable
          to unfasten it, any suggestions on how it would unscrew? I was
          considering using a charcoal filter and or thermometer at the base
          of the arm [small end] where the second brass connection is, and a
          worm coil. I saw a site that suggested using coils going up like 8
          turns then down 8 turns. At the hardware I found several different
          T's and 90 degree fittings and was planning on using something
          there. How hot does the vapor need to be to start the process
          through the worm , [ I have seen notes on 172/173 as well as 80/95
          degrees for the fermented wash to brew]; and how hot does the
          condensed vapor need to be when it falls from the tube? How long
          would a worm tube need to be to be air cooled. Is there a magic
          number of twists you generally need to get a better proof on your
          mixture? I think this unit could not hold much more than 1 or
          possibly 1-1/2 gallons max.

          As for leaks, I do not think there are any. I can blow into the
          tube [small end] and hold the pressure for a moment and it all blows
          back at me, kind of like blowing up a baloon and letting it go.

          I have a stone 1 gallon crock thermos and was thinking of using this
          for the mash. As to the mixture; heavens knows, I do not. I have
          corn and more corn to start with, but I have also seen fruit
          mixtures and am not sure if I should start with wine and something
          and try to hop the mix up to a better brew, ie brandy? Again I am
          so new at this the plastic wrapper is still stuck on me!

          Well that is what 3 questions of the next 100 to go? You will be
          hearing from me often, and yes I hope this is fun.


          --- In new_distillers@yahoogroups.com, Gregory Bloom <gjbloom@...>
          wrote:
          >
          > That looks like a sweet old potstill. I don't think you need
          coils or anything else. The main thing is to be able to control the
          heat going into it so you can keep it at a low simmer. That'll
          guarantee that you are able to condense the output using just an air-
          cooled arm. (I don't recommend using the wood stove it is pictured
          on because it'd be hard to control the temp, and may also heat the
          arm). If you want to increase your proof and purity a bit (at the
          possible cost of some flavor), you could pack the "mushroom head" on
          the top with copper pot-scrubbers (being sure they're really copper,
          not copper-coated iron - i.e. a magnet won't attract them). It'd
          also be useful to add a thermometer right at the throat of the arm
          to monitor the vapor temp of what you're condensing so you know
          about where you are in the run. (Though the old-time way to make
          your cuts is just by smell and the inevitable taste or two, rather
          than a thermometer). Be sure to clean the inside with vinegar
          > and salt or something to brighten the copper. This will help
          remove trace sulfur compounds and make a much-improved flavor. One
          thing that's hard to see in your photos is how many pieces it
          disassembles into. If it's all one piece that'll be a pain to clean.
          >
          > One other thing to pay close attention to is leaks. In a well-
          used still that old, it may not seal well at the joints. An old-
          time solution to this is to make a stiff flour and water dough and
          plug the leaks. After fooling with it a bit you can come to know
          where the leaks are and just plug them as part of your normal set-up.
          >
          > What you can make with this is any of the naturally flavorful
          spirits such as whiskey, rum, brandy, grappa, tequila, etc. What
          you can't make is perfect vodka (unless you're willing to redistill
          about 9 times to get pure vodka). I've come to prefer the artful
          challenge of using a potstill over the scientific precision of a
          reflux column. It certainly gives a more complex product.
          >
          > As far as where to start, I'd say have a look at the
          http://homedistiller.org site. I also recommend getting yourself a
          copy of Ian Smiley's "Making Pure Corn Whiskey" book.
          >
          > Looks like fun!
          >
          >
          > sixgablesmobileunit <mantle@...> wrote: Hello;
          >
          > I purchased an item at a gun show, listed in the photos section.
          I
          > wonder if it is a pot still?
          >
          > I am thinking it is. Ok so the next like 100 questions are:
          >
          > What can I make in this unit. It is all copper with the
          exception
          > of the end with what I think is a brass coupling. The top has a
          > small opening that has a screw in fitting, assuming this is for
          > the "mixture" to go in once it has fermented.
          >
          > I do not have the coils or anything else. I looked at a hardware
          > store and found a number of fittings that probably would
          interlock
          > in the fitting on the end of the unit. So the next question is
          does
          > this unit only need coils that are air cooled like 20 feet or so
          > stretched open. I do not know how many turns of the "worm" there
          > should be, especially if I am unable to run the coils in water to
          > cool them down.
          >
          > One thing was mentioned that this unit was used often by the old
          > timmer, but he was going into assisted living with his wife and
          got
          > rid of it. It has been used up to possibly 20 years ago. The
          guy I
          > bought it off of said it was painted with 4 different colors
          before
          > he got down to the patena, and I scrubbed it up with bar keeper's
          > friend. I need to scrub some more on it.
          >
          > Besides the coils, what else am I missing from this unit? I
          would
          > like to give it a go and see what happens. I do not know about
          the
          > receipe or anything to use to start it out or length of time. I
          > understand there is a fermenting process to do first then the
          actual
          > still use later.
          >
          > Anyone want to suggest help here?
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >
          > New Distillers group archives are at http://archive.nnytech.net/
          > FAQ and other information available at http://homedistiller.org
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >
          > SPONSORED LINKS
          > Food and
          drink Home
          distilling
          Culture
          Culture club
          Organizational culture
          Distillers

          >
          > ---------------------------------
          > YAHOO! GROUPS LINKS
          >
          >
          > Visit your group "new_distillers" on the web.
          >
          > To unsubscribe from this group, send an email to:
          > new_distillers-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com
          >
          > Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to the Yahoo! Terms of
          Service.
          >
          >
          > ---------------------------------
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >
          > ---------------------------------
          > Yahoo! Mail
          > Bring photos to life! New PhotoMail makes sharing a breeze.
          >
          > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
          >






          New Distillers group archives are at http://archive.nnytech.net/
          FAQ and other information available at http://homedistiller.org





          SPONSORED LINKS
          Food and drink Home distilling Culture Culture club Organizational culture Distillers

          ---------------------------------
          YAHOO! GROUPS LINKS


          Visit your group "new_distillers" on the web.

          To unsubscribe from this group, send an email to:
          new_distillers-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com

          Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to the Yahoo! Terms of Service.


          ---------------------------------





          ---------------------------------
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          Use Photomail to share photos without annoying attachments.

          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        • pugs2510
          cool still ,,all you really need is 1 gallon water one pound corn meal and 1 pound suger add some yeast . let it sit till she stops bubbling ( keep 70 and 80
          Message 4 of 11 , Mar 6, 2006
            cool still ,,all you really need is 1 gallon water one pound corn meal
            and 1 pound suger add some yeast . let it sit till she stops bubbling (
            keep 70 and 80 degrees). . strain liquid pore into your little still .
            heat with vary low heat . stop collecting when a spoon full does not
            burn (somewhere not near still ) go slow you have and old school still
            on your hands . way cool just like grand dad usta have .
            --- In new_distillers@yahoogroups.com, "sixgablesmobileunit"
            <mantle@...> wrote:
            >
            > Hello;
            >
            > I purchased an item at a gun show, listed in the photos section. I
            > wonder if it is a pot still?
            >
            > I am thinking it is. Ok so the next like 100 questions are:
            >
            > What can I make in this unit. It is all copper with the exception
            > of the end with what I think is a brass coupling. The top has a
            > small opening that has a screw in fitting, assuming this is for
            > the "mixture" to go in once it has fermented.
            >
            > I do not have the coils or anything else. I looked at a hardware
            > store and found a number of fittings that probably would interlock
            > in the fitting on the end of the unit. So the next question is does
            > this unit only need coils that are air cooled like 20 feet or so
            > stretched open. I do not know how many turns of the "worm" there
            > should be, especially if I am unable to run the coils in water to
            > cool them down.
            >
            > One thing was mentioned that this unit was used often by the old
            > timmer, but he was going into assisted living with his wife and got
            > rid of it. It has been used up to possibly 20 years ago. The guy I
            > bought it off of said it was painted with 4 different colors before
            > he got down to the patena, and I scrubbed it up with bar keeper's
            > friend. I need to scrub some more on it.
            >
            > Besides the coils, what else am I missing from this unit? I would
            > like to give it a go and see what happens. I do not know about the
            > receipe or anything to use to start it out or length of time. I
            > understand there is a fermenting process to do first then the actual
            > still use later.
            >
            > Anyone want to suggest help here?
            >
          • donald holcombe
            What about malt or enzymes or mashing ? This is just wasting cornmeal. pugs2510 wrote: cool still ,,all you really need is 1 gallon
            Message 5 of 11 , Mar 7, 2006
              What about malt or enzymes or mashing ? This is just wasting cornmeal.

              pugs2510 <pugs2510@...> wrote: cool still ,,all you really need is 1 gallon water one pound corn meal
              and 1 pound suger add some yeast . let it sit till she stops bubbling (
              keep 70 and 80 degrees). . strain liquid pore into your little still .
              heat with vary low heat . stop collecting when a spoon full does not
              burn (somewhere not near still ) go slow you have and old school still
              on your hands . way cool just like grand dad usta have .
              --- In new_distillers@yahoogroups.com, "sixgablesmobileunit"
              <mantle@...> wrote:
              >
              > Hello;
              >
              > I purchased an item at a gun show, listed in the photos section. I
              > wonder if it is a pot still?
              >
              > I am thinking it is. Ok so the next like 100 questions are:
              >
              > What can I make in this unit. It is all copper with the exception
              > of the end with what I think is a brass coupling. The top has a
              > small opening that has a screw in fitting, assuming this is for
              > the "mixture" to go in once it has fermented.
              >
              > I do not have the coils or anything else. I looked at a hardware
              > store and found a number of fittings that probably would interlock
              > in the fitting on the end of the unit. So the next question is does
              > this unit only need coils that are air cooled like 20 feet or so
              > stretched open. I do not know how many turns of the "worm" there
              > should be, especially if I am unable to run the coils in water to
              > cool them down.
              >
              > One thing was mentioned that this unit was used often by the old
              > timmer, but he was going into assisted living with his wife and got
              > rid of it. It has been used up to possibly 20 years ago. The guy I
              > bought it off of said it was painted with 4 different colors before
              > he got down to the patena, and I scrubbed it up with bar keeper's
              > friend. I need to scrub some more on it.
              >
              > Besides the coils, what else am I missing from this unit? I would
              > like to give it a go and see what happens. I do not know about the
              > receipe or anything to use to start it out or length of time. I
              > understand there is a fermenting process to do first then the actual
              > still use later.
              >
              > Anyone want to suggest help here?
              >







              New Distillers group archives are at http://archive.nnytech.net/
              FAQ and other information available at http://homedistiller.org





              SPONSORED LINKS
              Food and drink Home distilling Culture Culture club Organizational culture Distillers

              ---------------------------------
              YAHOO! GROUPS LINKS


              Visit your group "new_distillers" on the web.

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            • sixgablesmobileunit
              OK in addition to the last few comments that have beens said about the pot still I have. TODAY, I just found out that it does come appart, when I took a
              Message 6 of 11 , Mar 7, 2006
                OK in addition to the last few comments that have beens said about
                the pot still I have. TODAY, I just found out that it does come
                appart, when I took a rubber mallet and knocked against the top.
                The entire thing was very tightly sealed and did not screw on or off
                but friction fit. OK now we have a definate winner! This opens up
                several things;

                1. The pot still is coated on the inside, and all of the joints
                have been sweated/soldered. Over the joint manufacture, a coating
                has been placed kind of like nickel and has some crust on it that I
                have cleaned off. Surprise? Has anyone else ever seen anything
                like this before? Seamed joints on the outside and sweated/soldered
                on the inside and coated? This is not a home job, but a
                professional built unit. I can now pack the mushroom head with the
                copper pads. What is the benefit of this process?

                2. The valve on top now comes into play. I have been told to look
                at putting a thermometer in the unit. well I can see what this 1
                inch threaded hole was used.

                3a. Since I can now get inside the unit and clean it, the next
                question is:
                The small batch receipe given to me; when the mixture is
                fermented first, and seperated out, I was instructed to use a low
                temp to distill with the wash. So what is a low temp? Are we
                talking 80 degrees or 180 or what? As for malting, when is this
                added and is this sprouted grain dryed first or is it green when
                added to the fermentation pot? I will not be using corn meal as I
                burn corn and have access to shelled corn.

                3b. Also I never got a real answer to the number of twists of the
                coil or direction. There is a brass screw type connection at the end
                of the arm and I assume it went for a traditional water bath type of
                coil placement system below the height of still. I can see a band
                mark on the bottom of the still where someone used a round frame to
                hold it probably over a fire. I plan on trying to keep the coils
                above the unit since I have no access to a water bath. I seem to
                recall on a couple to TV shows something about if the coil twists
                were tight then the brew was better-is this true? I want to run the
                coils straight up from a 90 degree angle connection toward the
                ceiling about 9 twists of a Spaumante bottle then angle it downward
                slightly for probably 10 inches and add about 6 additional twists of
                the same diameter to the floor but never going really past where the
                end of the arm is; now is that acceptable?

                4. A really big question, considering this whole thing might just
                blow up, What do I "drip" the coil into? An open container or
                something closed? I am assuming I should use stoneware or glass,
                but again I have no idea.


                Thanks for the response already. I am very happy I picked this up
                at the gun show. I think it was the jewl in the rough so to speak.
                I want to thank those who have answered already!




                --- In new_distillers@yahoogroups.com, Gregory Bloom <gjbloom@...>
                wrote:
                >
                > That looks like a sweet old potstill. I don't think you need
                coils or anything else. The main thing is to be able to control the
                heat going into it so you can keep it at a low simmer. That'll
                guarantee that you are able to condense the output using just an air-
                cooled arm. (I don't recommend using the wood stove it is pictured
                on because it'd be hard to control the temp, and may also heat the
                arm). If you want to increase your proof and purity a bit (at the
                possible cost of some flavor), you could pack the "mushroom head" on
                the top with copper pot-scrubbers (being sure they're really copper,
                not copper-coated iron - i.e. a magnet won't attract them). It'd
                also be useful to add a thermometer right at the throat of the arm
                to monitor the vapor temp of what you're condensing so you know
                about where you are in the run. (Though the old-time way to make
                your cuts is just by smell and the inevitable taste or two, rather
                than a thermometer). Be sure to clean the inside with vinegar
                > and salt or something to brighten the copper. This will help
                remove trace sulfur compounds and make a much-improved flavor. One
                thing that's hard to see in your photos is how many pieces it
                disassembles into. If it's all one piece that'll be a pain to clean.
                >
                > One other thing to pay close attention to is leaks. In a well-
                used still that old, it may not seal well at the joints. An old-
                time solution to this is to make a stiff flour and water dough and
                plug the leaks. After fooling with it a bit you can come to know
                where the leaks are and just plug them as part of your normal set-up.
                >
                > What you can make with this is any of the naturally flavorful
                spirits such as whiskey, rum, brandy, grappa, tequila, etc. What
                you can't make is perfect vodka (unless you're willing to redistill
                about 9 times to get pure vodka). I've come to prefer the artful
                challenge of using a potstill over the scientific precision of a
                reflux column. It certainly gives a more complex product.
                >
                > As far as where to start, I'd say have a look at the
                http://homedistiller.org site. I also recommend getting yourself a
                copy of Ian Smiley's "Making Pure Corn Whiskey" book.
                >
                > Looks like fun!
                >
                >
                > sixgablesmobileunit <mantle@...> wrote: Hello;
                >
                > I purchased an item at a gun show, listed in the photos section.
                I
                > wonder if it is a pot still?
                >
                > I am thinking it is. Ok so the next like 100 questions are:
                >
                > What can I make in this unit. It is all copper with the
                exception
                > of the end with what I think is a brass coupling. The top has a
                > small opening that has a screw in fitting, assuming this is for
                > the "mixture" to go in once it has fermented.
                >
                > I do not have the coils or anything else. I looked at a hardware
                > store and found a number of fittings that probably would
                interlock
                > in the fitting on the end of the unit. So the next question is
                does
                > this unit only need coils that are air cooled like 20 feet or so
                > stretched open. I do not know how many turns of the "worm" there
                > should be, especially if I am unable to run the coils in water to
                > cool them down.
                >
                > One thing was mentioned that this unit was used often by the old
                > timmer, but he was going into assisted living with his wife and
                got
                > rid of it. It has been used up to possibly 20 years ago. The
                guy I
                > bought it off of said it was painted with 4 different colors
                before
                > he got down to the patena, and I scrubbed it up with bar keeper's
                > friend. I need to scrub some more on it.
                >
                > Besides the coils, what else am I missing from this unit? I
                would
                > like to give it a go and see what happens. I do not know about
                the
                > receipe or anything to use to start it out or length of time. I
                > understand there is a fermenting process to do first then the
                actual
                > still use later.
                >
                > Anyone want to suggest help here?
                >
                >
                >
                >
                >
                >
                >
                > New Distillers group archives are at http://archive.nnytech.net/
                > FAQ and other information available at http://homedistiller.org
                >
                >
                >
                >
                >
                > SPONSORED LINKS
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                > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
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              • sixgablesmobileunit
                Thanks for responding! I have a couple of questions and a comment or two. There seems to be some idea that I should be using malted corn. Ok so your take on
                Message 7 of 11 , Mar 7, 2006
                  Thanks for responding! I have a couple of questions and a comment
                  or two. There seems to be some idea that I should be using malted
                  corn. Ok so your take on this? Also, I found out the top of the
                  still does open but is very tite. I guess I just pour your mixture
                  into it and go. Do I need a thermometer? As I have indicated in my
                  last note, what is very low heat? I burn a corn stove, and as in
                  the photos, can I just put it on there. The surface is hot to the
                  touch but when I place a pan of water on top and after it warms up
                  you can touch the water with out burning, but it will simmer till it
                  is all gone in about a day. I need to say here, the top will not
                  really get hot enough to cook on but you can not place your hand on
                  it for very long.

                  The receipe, is that your grandfather's, or were you just making a
                  remark like "grandfather" meaning any old timmer's?

                  Another thing, what is your take on cooling coils, the worm? The
                  end of the arm has a brass connector for some type of cooling unit.
                  I would have assumed water bath because there is a banding around
                  the bottom of the unit that indicates it sat in some sort of a
                  frame, and the cooling unit was probably below the unit its self.

                  Thanks for responding!




                  --- In new_distillers@yahoogroups.com, "pugs2510" <pugs2510@...>
                  wrote:
                  >
                  > cool still ,,all you really need is 1 gallon water one pound corn
                  meal
                  > and 1 pound suger add some yeast . let it sit till she stops
                  bubbling (
                  > keep 70 and 80 degrees). . strain liquid pore into your little
                  still .
                  > heat with vary low heat . stop collecting when a spoon full does
                  not
                  > burn (somewhere not near still ) go slow you have and old school
                  still
                  > on your hands . way cool just like grand dad usta have .
                  > --- In new_distillers@yahoogroups.com, "sixgablesmobileunit"
                  > <mantle@> wrote:
                  > >
                  > > Hello;
                  > >
                  > > I purchased an item at a gun show, listed in the photos section.
                  I
                  > > wonder if it is a pot still?
                  > >
                  > > I am thinking it is. Ok so the next like 100 questions are:
                  > >
                  > > What can I make in this unit. It is all copper with the exception
                  > > of the end with what I think is a brass coupling. The top has a
                  > > small opening that has a screw in fitting, assuming this is for
                  > > the "mixture" to go in once it has fermented.
                  > >
                  > > I do not have the coils or anything else. I looked at a hardware
                  > > store and found a number of fittings that probably would
                  interlock
                  > > in the fitting on the end of the unit. So the next question is
                  does
                  > > this unit only need coils that are air cooled like 20 feet or so
                  > > stretched open. I do not know how many turns of the "worm" there
                  > > should be, especially if I am unable to run the coils in water to
                  > > cool them down.
                  > >
                  > > One thing was mentioned that this unit was used often by the old
                  > > timmer, but he was going into assisted living with his wife and
                  got
                  > > rid of it. It has been used up to possibly 20 years ago. The guy
                  I
                  > > bought it off of said it was painted with 4 different colors
                  before
                  > > he got down to the patena, and I scrubbed it up with bar keeper's
                  > > friend. I need to scrub some more on it.
                  > >
                  > > Besides the coils, what else am I missing from this unit? I would
                  > > like to give it a go and see what happens. I do not know about
                  the
                  > > receipe or anything to use to start it out or length of time. I
                  > > understand there is a fermenting process to do first then the
                  actual
                  > > still use later.
                  > >
                  > > Anyone want to suggest help here?
                  > >
                  >
                • pugs2510
                  just a simple recipe ive played around with mashing. quit messy and using only corn idont see much return for the trouble . again just a simple moonshine
                  Message 8 of 11 , Mar 8, 2006
                    just a simple recipe ive played around with mashing. quit messy and
                    using only corn idont see much return for the trouble . again just a
                    simple moonshine recipe.
                    --- In new_distillers@yahoogroups.com, donald holcombe
                    <blackledge_02@...> wrote:
                    >
                    > What about malt or enzymes or mashing ? This is just wasting cornmeal.
                    >
                    > pugs2510 pugs2510@... wrote: cool still ,,all you really need is 1
                    gallon water one pound corn meal
                    > and 1 pound suger add some yeast . let it sit till she stops bubbling
                    (
                    > keep 70 and 80 degrees). . strain liquid pore into your little still .
                    > heat with vary low heat . stop collecting when a spoon full does not
                    > burn (somewhere not near still ) go slow you have and old school still
                    > on your hands . way cool just like grand dad usta have .
                    > --- In new_distillers@yahoogroups.com, "sixgablesmobileunit"
                    > mantle@ wrote:
                    > >
                    > > Hello;
                    > >
                    > > I purchased an item at a gun show, listed in the photos section. I
                    > > wonder if it is a pot still?
                    > >
                    > > I am thinking it is. Ok so the next like 100 questions are:
                    > >
                    > > What can I make in this unit. It is all copper with the exception
                    > > of the end with what I think is a brass coupling. The top has a
                    > > small opening that has a screw in fitting, assuming this is for
                    > > the "mixture" to go in once it has fermented.
                    > >
                    > > I do not have the coils or anything else. I looked at a hardware
                    > > store and found a number of fittings that probably would interlock
                    > > in the fitting on the end of the unit. So the next question is does
                    > > this unit only need coils that are air cooled like 20 feet or so
                    > > stretched open. I do not know how many turns of the "worm" there
                    > > should be, especially if I am unable to run the coils in water to
                    > > cool them down.
                    > >
                    > > One thing was mentioned that this unit was used often by the old
                    > > timmer, but he was going into assisted living with his wife and got
                    > > rid of it. It has been used up to possibly 20 years ago. The guy I
                    > > bought it off of said it was painted with 4 different colors before
                    > > he got down to the patena, and I scrubbed it up with bar keeper's
                    > > friend. I need to scrub some more on it.
                    > >
                    > > Besides the coils, what else am I missing from this unit? I would
                    > > like to give it a go and see what happens. I do not know about the
                    > > receipe or anything to use to start it out or length of time. I
                    > > understand there is a fermenting process to do first then the actual
                    > > still use later.
                    > >
                    > > Anyone want to suggest help here?
                    > >
                    >
                    >
                    >
                    >
                    >
                    >
                    >
                    > New Distillers group archives are at http://archive.nnytech.net/
                    > FAQ and other information available at http://homedistiller.org
                    >
                    >
                    >
                    >
                    >
                    > SPONSORED LINKS
                    > Food and drink Home distilling Culture Culture club Organizational
                    culture Distillers
                    >
                    > ---------------------------------
                    > YAHOO! GROUPS LINKS
                    >
                    >
                    > Visit your group "new_distillers" on the web.
                    >
                    > To unsubscribe from this group, send an email to:
                    > new_distillers-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com
                    >
                    > Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to the Yahoo! Terms of Service.
                    >
                    >
                    > ---------------------------------
                    >
                    >
                    >
                    >
                    >
                    > ---------------------------------
                    > Yahoo! Mail
                    > Bring photos to life! New PhotoMail makes sharing a breeze.
                    >
                    > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                    >
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