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RE: [new_distillers] Corn

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  • Brendan Keith
    Gelatinizing the starch molecules causes them to unravel, from their initial compact form, to a bunch of outstretched strands which the malt enzymes
    Message 1 of 3 , Mar 1, 2006
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      Gelatinizing the starch molecules causes them to unravel, from their initial
      compact form, to a bunch of outstretched strands which the malt enzymes
      (amyloglucosidases) can act upon and break down into simpler sugars
      (conversion), which is then consumed by the yeast to produce alcohol
      (fermentation).

      Ungelatinized starches won't convert or ferment.

      Your long hold at ~150F likely performs the gelatinization and conversion
      simultaneously.

      The Links are only visible from the Yahoo groups web page, not the digest or
      individual emails.

      A corn mash will have a far lower proportion of barley husks than an all
      barley mash, hence less tannin. Perhaps that's why they are sparged and
      corn is not.

      A fermenting all grain corn mash (in my experience) starts to smell like
      pretty rotten feet, although it distills out OK. Simply "turning on the
      tap" to sparge a thin mash might not extract all of the sugars. Lautering
      will help extract more, and yield a clearer wash. A final lauter with fresh
      water will push the last bit of sweet wort out. Depends on how much effort
      you want to exert. Google "No sparge" for more info.

      --
      Brendan Keith
      bkeith@...


      -----Original Message-----
      From: new_distillers@yahoogroups.com
      [mailto:new_distillers@yahoogroups.com]On Behalf Of Michael Eyre
      Sent: Tuesday, February 28, 2006 3:50 PM
      To: new_distillers@yahoogroups.com
      Subject: [new_distillers] Corn

      ...
      While we're at it, I've searched the site and found a lot of the word
      "gelatinize" when working with corn, but I'm not sure what this process
      actually *means*. What is the corn doing when it's gelatizing that makes
      it more suitable than not gelatinizing it?

      As an aside, for my current sessions, I'm actually heating and mashing
      everything I do in a large crock pot. If you haven't thought about it,
      it's a fantastic way to heat and maintain the heat on 3-4 lbs of grain
      for whatever amount of time you need. I use it mostly for making gallon
      sized yeast starters for beer. The pot holds temps fairly well itself
      when up to temp, and my particular "low" crock pot setting holds at a
      146-152 degree window for me.


      BTW, I'm getting the digest form of this, so I never see the "Links"
      thing at all on my screen. I'll try and find it online later...


      Morgan also mentions fermenting "on the grain", which is something I did
      not do. After a little web research, I found that single malt wash is
      usually sparged off the grains and fermented clear with no grains, while
      corn whisky style stuff is sometimes (not all?!) fermented on the grain.
      ...
    • morganfield1
      Hi Mike, That s what I ment by light grain wash . I mash about 4 lbs. of corn (with powdered enzyme) in 3 gal. of water, then, when the mash is done, put that
      Message 2 of 3 , Mar 1, 2006
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        Hi Mike,
        That's what I ment by "light grain wash". I mash about 4 lbs. of
        corn (with powdered enzyme) in 3 gal. of water, then, when the mash
        is done, put that in my fermenter, and add enough water to bring the
        entire volume up to 6 gal. When the corn is gelitanized, it's about
        the consistancy of oatmeal. After a successful mash, it's somewhat
        thinner, but still thick. After fermentation, most of the liquid has
        seperated from the spent corn, which sinks to the bottom. As with
        any on the grain ferment, you have to swirl it up every couple of
        days.
        Now, I think corn only has just over 50% fermentable sugars in it,
        so if your going for an all grain mash, your going to need alot of
        corn. You can also add more barley, or rye, something with more
        available sugars. There are others on this forum more knowledgable
        about all grain brewing than I who can help you out here.
        Tip one, Morgan

        --- In new_distillers@yahoogroups.com, "Michael Eyre" <meyre@...>
        wrote:
        >
        > Morgan also mentions fermenting "on the grain", which is something
        I did
        > not do. After a little web research, I found that single malt wash
        is
        > usually sparged off the grains and fermented clear with no grains,
        while
        > corn whisky style stuff is sometimes (not all?!) fermented on the
        grain.
        > My only question with this is, I assume you have to mash your
        grains (as
        > I wish to stay all grain, with no processed sugar used) like you
        > normally would at 150 degrees or so for a while. Then, you dilute
        the
        > whole mess with several gallons of water of whatever would be the
        > appropriate amount for your particular recipe... and then pitch
        your
        > yeast into this now diluted amount? In my case, this would have
        been 2
        > gallons of finished wort/wash by using 3lbs of grains... or, do you
        > pitch the yeast into your very thick mash that has only (in my
        case) 3
        > quarts of water per pound of grain (3lbs, in my case)?
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