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RE: [new_distillers] Cutting the product

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  • Tim Lebsanft
    I live in a metro area in Oz and just use tap water... It gets carbon treated anyway... 8-)
    Message 1 of 14 , Dec 1, 2005
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      I live in a metro area in Oz and just use tap water... It gets carbon
      treated anyway... 8-)


      >From: Sam Thomas <bob_the_borg@...>
      >Reply-To: new_distillers@yahoogroups.com
      >To: new_distillers@yahoogroups.com
      >Subject: [new_distillers] Cutting the product
      >Date: Tue, 29 Nov 2005 06:43:33 -0800 (PST)
      >
      >I've read where people are producing 180 proof spirits and then cutting it
      >down to like 80 proof.
      >
      > My question is, what does one use to cut the spirit with? Distilled
      >water? Spring water? Deer urine? (j/k) I have no idea.
      >
      > A friend of mine suggested adding a box of red hots to the 180 proof and
      >let it sit for a week.
      >
      > I want it to be drinkable but not as strong as everclear.
      >
      >
      >---------------------------------
      > Yahoo! Personals
      > Single? There's someone we'd like you to meet.
      > Lots of someones, actually. Try Yahoo! Personals
      >
      >[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      >
    • Harry
      ... carbon ... Are you sure about that, Tim? Most areas of Oz, particularly Qld coast, still use sand filters, chlorine disinfectant & floc technology. Some
      Message 2 of 14 , Dec 1, 2005
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        --- In new_distillers@yahoogroups.com, "Tim Lebsanft"
        <bundy_rum98@h...> wrote:
        >
        > I live in a metro area in Oz and just use tap water... It gets
        carbon
        > treated anyway... 8-)



        Are you sure about that, Tim? Most areas of Oz, particularly Qld
        coast, still use sand filters, chlorine disinfectant & floc
        technology. Some (like where I live) have introduced
        microfiltration. But only in problem areas is carbon used, because
        of the costs...

        http://www.waterquality.crc.org.au/consumers/Consumersp9.htm

        <ext>
        Activated carbon is the most widely used adsorbent material in water
        treatment, because it is highly effective in removing taste and
        odour compounds and algal toxins. It can be used as a powder or in
        granular form.

        In Australia, there has only been limited use of granulated
        activated carbon. In this treatment process, the activated carbon is
        usually placed in a column or filter and the water percolated
        through the bed of carbon granules. After some time the activated
        carbon will become saturated with the adsorbing material and will
        need to be replaced or regenerated. Current technology to regenerate
        the carbon granules involves heating in a high temperature furnace.
        Because of the cost of this regeneration process, it has not been
        used in Australia.

        If water contamination occurs only occasionally, a better approach
        is to add powdered activated carbon to a conventional
        coagulation/flocculation process when the problem arises. The carbon
        is collected in the filters and then discarded with the normal water
        treatment plant sludge. Such intermittent dosing of activated carbon
        powder is used in Australia at numerous locations that have problems
        with blue-green algal blooms.

        The use of activated carbon is a very costly and can be justified
        only when there are particular problems with toxins or taste and
        odour compounds.
        </ext>



        Phone your local council and ask them what the setup is.


        Slainte!
        regards Harry
      • Tim
        Sorry Harry, I think I might have you confused, my bad mate. What I was trying to say is that *I* use carbon treatment, not the actual water out of the tap.
        Message 3 of 14 , Dec 3, 2005
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          Sorry Harry, I think I might have you confused, my bad mate. What I was trying to say is that *I* use carbon treatment, not the
          actual water out of the tap. Is that better...? 8-)



          _____

          From: new_distillers@yahoogroups.com [mailto:new_distillers@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of Harry
          Sent: Friday, 2 December 2005 10:58 AM
          To: new_distillers@yahoogroups.com
          Subject: [new_distillers] Re: Cutting the product


          --- In new_distillers@yahoogroups.com, "Tim Lebsanft"
          <bundy_rum98@h...> wrote:
          >
          > I live in a metro area in Oz and just use tap water... It gets
          carbon
          > treated anyway... 8-)



          Are you sure about that, Tim? Most areas of Oz, particularly Qld
          coast, still use sand filters, chlorine disinfectant & floc
          technology. Some (like where I live) have introduced
          microfiltration. But only in problem areas is carbon used, because
          of the costs...

          HYPERLINK "http://www.waterquality.crc.org.au/consumers/Consumersp9.htm"http://www.waterquality.crc.org.au/consumers/Consumersp9.htm

          <ext>
          Activated carbon is the most widely used adsorbent material in water
          treatment, because it is highly effective in removing taste and
          odour compounds and algal toxins. It can be used as a powder or in
          granular form.

          In Australia, there has only been limited use of granulated
          activated carbon. In this treatment process, the activated carbon is
          usually placed in a column or filter and the water percolated
          through the bed of carbon granules. After some time the activated
          carbon will become saturated with the adsorbing material and will
          need to be replaced or regenerated. Current technology to regenerate
          the carbon granules involves heating in a high temperature furnace.
          Because of the cost of this regeneration process, it has not been
          used in Australia.

          If water contamination occurs only occasionally, a better approach
          is to add powdered activated carbon to a conventional
          coagulation/flocculation process when the problem arises. The carbon
          is collected in the filters and then discarded with the normal water
          treatment plant sludge. Such intermittent dosing of activated carbon
          powder is used in Australia at numerous locations that have problems
          with blue-green algal blooms.

          The use of activated carbon is a very costly and can be justified
          only when there are particular problems with toxins or taste and
          odour compounds.
          </ext>



          Phone your local council and ask them what the setup is.


          Slainte!
          regards Harry





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          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        • Harry
          ... I was trying to say is that *I* use carbon treatment, not the ... Ah, ok. Well no matter, it s a good read anyway. Can t hurt to know about our friendly
          Message 4 of 14 , Dec 3, 2005
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            --- In new_distillers@yahoogroups.com, "Tim" <bundy_rum98@h...>
            wrote:
            >
            > Sorry Harry, I think I might have you confused, my bad mate. What
            I was trying to say is that *I* use carbon treatment, not the
            > actual water out of the tap. Is that better...? 8-)
            >
            >




            Ah, ok. Well no matter, it's a good read anyway. Can't hurt to
            know about our friendly council's water supply ideas. ;-)



            Slainte!
            regards Harry

            (Now I'm off to bed...again. Bloody barking dogs woke me)
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